Unique, multi-sensory art exhibition returning to Dayton in October

“We want everyone to know what we’re doing so we can make it big,” she added.

DiscoverRead more about Molly Brockman

Brockman has lost most of her sight due to diabetic retinopathy for the past three years. An operation to restore some aspects of her vision took away much of her vision. Brockman has light-dark vision in her right eye and is completely blind in her left eye.

“It was really, really tough,” she previously said. “Having to relearn everything is not easy.”

One thing she had to relearn was to experience museums and art galleries, which inspired her to create a multi-sensory art exhibition for the visually impaired.

Beyond Vision: A Tactile Art Experience took place at the end of April. The multi-sensory art exhibition for the visually impaired highlighted all five senses to engage them. People could touch the art (post photo).

Credit: Submitted Photo

Credit: Submitted Photo

Beyond Vision: A Tactile Art Experience took place at the end of April. The multi-sensory art exhibition for the visually impaired highlighted all five senses to engage them. People could touch the art (post photo).

Credit: Submitted Photo

Credit: Submitted Photo

Her first exhibition entitled Beyond Vision: A Tactile Art Experience took place at the end of April.

“[The previous show]did really, really well,” Brockman said. “We had around 200 people come. Everyone loved it. It was a bigger success than I expected.”

The exhibits appeal to all five senses: touch, hearing, taste, smell and sight. In the previous exhibit, guests could touch and see the pieces, hear music, and smell and taste chicken wings from Vee’s Premium Rubs.

DiscoverBest of Dayton 2022: Nominate your favorite here

“When you’re blind, especially when you’re completely blind, it’s dark,” Brockman said. “I live in the dark all the time and this is a way of getting the art out because now we have a way to experience art that we didn’t have before.”

If you are interested in participating in the exhibition as an artist, send your work to submit@beyondvisionart.com or call 937-999-1375. Brockman said they are looking for artists who can create multi-sensory art, including tactile, reading, music, as well as art that people can smell or taste.

Beyond Vision is also looking for volunteers and donations for the event.

For more information visit, www.beyondvisionart.com or that of the organization Facebook (@beyondvisionart) or Instagram (@beyondvisionart) pages.

Beyond Vision: A Tactile Art Experience took place at the end of April. The multi-sensory art exhibition for the visually impaired highlighted all five senses to engage them. People could touch the art (post photo).

Credit: Submitted Photo

"Beyond Vision: A Tactile Art Experience” took place at the end of April.  The multi-sensory art exhibition for the visually impaired highlighted all five senses as inclusive.  People could touch the art (POST PHOTO).

Credit: Submitted Photo

Beyond Vision: A Tactile Art Experience took place at the end of April. The multi-sensory art exhibition for the visually impaired highlighted all five senses to engage them. People could touch the art (post photo).

Credit: Submitted Photo

Credit: Submitted Photo

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