South County Art Association has something for everyone with its newest exhibit | Art & life

0

SOUTH KINGSTOWN, RI – Although a typical exhibition at the South County Art Association includes about 80 works, the current exhibition includes over 100 – and that’s thanks to a juror who was more involved in the arranging process than usual.

Jason Fong, SCAA’s exhibit manager, typically limits exhibits to “about 60 pieces for the walls plus 3D work,” he said. However, Robert Pillsbury, who judged the show currently on show, cut in half the roughly 200 submissions he received before hitting a breakpoint.

“He got to a point where he just took me aside and said, ‘I’m starting to take things out that I really don’t want to take out,'” Fong said.

Since Fong’s limit depends on how much artwork can fit in the gallery, he and Pillsbury set about arranging the exhibition so that more works can be shown.

The result? An open, juried All Media II exhibition with around 100 pieces, around 20 more than usual.

“There’s a lot to see on the show, there’s a lot of work to do,” said Fong. “And I would say that the quality is very high.”

In a cross-media exhibition, “pretty much anything is possible,” said Fong. This exhibition is no exception as it features works from painting to photography to ceramics and collage.

In fact, the first place winner Paula Imbergamo used more than one medium to create a “Combine Painting” from collage, found objects and color. When creating her piece entitled “Long Time Coming, Long Time Gone”, Imbergamo was inspired by people and current events.

Pillsbury described Imbergamo’s work in his testimony as “a beautiful construction”.

“The choice of imagery and content make an impressive combination,” Pillsbury wrote. “The remarkable craftsmanship with which the objects and images are placed and brought together attracts the viewer for a closer look.”

Artist Eric Hovermale also created an award-winning mixed media piece called “Shadow Figure”.

Hovermale used Adobe Photoshop to combine an image with text from Omar Khayyam’s Rubaiyat – a collection of stanzas originally translated from Persian to English in 1859 – and received an Honorable Mention for his work.

“I’ve always enjoyed images combined with text – it adds another dimension,” said Hovermale. “I chose a translucent material for printing so that light falls through the picture from behind and is reflected off the surface. That felt appropriate to the text. “

Second place went to Judy Salvadore for “A Murder of One,” a still life centered around a crow that died in her garden.

Salvadore keeps natural materials – flowers, grass, branches, shells, bees, dragonflies – in her home and arranges collages from them. Describing her workplace as “organized chaos,” she said that it usually takes around 3-4 hours to create and photograph a collage portrait.

“As soon as the portrait is finished, the animal will be honored with a ceremony and given back to nature. It is very important for me to thank the animal for letting me work with it, ”said Salvadore. “Some people may think it’s all so morbid, but I have the feeling that my portraits respect the beauty of all living things, even after death.”

The artist Deb Costello, who received an Honorable Mention for her ceramics fired from pits entitled “Approaching Fog”, was one of several artists who brought their pits-fired works to the exhibition immediately after their creation.

“One of our instructors made a pit fire last weekend and they got such great results that they took their pots out of the fire and took them straight to the gallery and submitted them to the show,” said Fong. “There is some really notable pit fire work on the show from this burn.”

The color effects in Approaching Fog were derived from the burning process, Costello said. To create it, she wrapped her piece with pine needles and seaweed and placed it in a pit with sawdust and wood.

The fire transformed the surface of the clay, creating a variety of patterns and colors, she said.

“I am fascinated by the unpredictability of this method, which creates dramatic effects in soft areas of color,” said Costello.

The award winners were all delighted with the placement in the exhibition and also praised the South County Art Association.

“The SCAA staff are the friendliest and most supportive of any art association in the state,” said Hovermale. “I am happy to just walk through the door.”

Anyone can visit the exhibition from now until November 13th during normal gallery hours (Wednesday to Sunday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.).

“He got to a point where he just took me aside and said, ‘I’m starting to take things out that I really don’t want to take out,'” Fong said.

Since Fong’s limit depends on how much artwork can fit in the gallery, he and Pillsbury set about arranging the exhibition so that more works can be shown.

The result? An open, juried All Media II exhibition with around 100 pieces, around 20 more than usual.

“There’s a lot to see on the show, there’s a lot of work to do,” said Fong. “And I would say that the quality is very high.”

In a cross-media exhibition, “pretty much anything is possible,” said Fong. This exhibition is no exception as it features works from painting to photography to ceramics and collage.

In fact, the first place winner Paula Imbergamo used more than one medium to create a “Combine Painting” from collage, found objects and color. When creating her piece entitled “Long Time Coming, Long Time Gone”, Imbergamo was inspired by people and current events.

Pillsbury described Imbergamo’s work in his testimony as “a beautiful construction”.

“The choice of imagery and content make an impressive combination,” Pillsbury wrote. “The remarkable craftsmanship with which the objects and images are placed and brought together attracts the viewer for a closer look.”


Source link

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.