European Art – Maori Art http://maoriart.net/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 23:40:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://maoriart.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png European Art – Maori Art http://maoriart.net/ 32 32 Yves Klein, Anna Weyant take Christie’s London-Paris sales to $250 million. – ARTnews.com https://maoriart.net/yves-klein-anna-weyant-take-christies-london-paris-sales-to-250-million-artnews-com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 23:40:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/yves-klein-anna-weyant-take-christies-london-paris-sales-to-250-million-artnews-com/ Christie’s held two back-to-back modern and contemporary art auctions in London and Paris on Tuesday afternoon, raising a total of $250 million in fees. The 106 lots on offer included works by young newcomers such as Anna Weyant and pieces by long-gone art historical personalities such as Claude Monet. About 97 works were sold, with […]]]>

Christie’s held two back-to-back modern and contemporary art auctions in London and Paris on Tuesday afternoon, raising a total of $250 million in fees.

The 106 lots on offer included works by young newcomers such as Anna Weyant and pieces by long-gone art historical personalities such as Claude Monet. About 97 works were sold, with one work by Cy Twombly having been withdrawn in advance. Twenty-eight lots in the auctions were guaranteed; 24 of them were secured with irrevocable bids.

In fact, the Paris section focused on European artists. Works by Yves Klein, Pierre Soulages, Jean Paul Riopelle and Jean Hélion L’escalier have sold for as little as $1.2 million to $2.2 million.

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The total hammer price for the entire grouping across both sales before fees was US$200.7 million, at the lower end of the pre-sale estimate of £145-213 million (US$177-259 million). Among the high profile visitors seen in the showroom was retailer Helly Namad.

Blue chip male artists accounted for most of the top lots.

Two Pastel Landscapes by Claude Monet, Waterloo Bridge, brume effect (1904) and Nymphéas, temps gris (1907) generated a total of 60 million pounds ($74 million).

Yves Klein’s 1960 canvas Anthropometrie de l’époque bleue, (ANT 124), which was first offered for sale at Christie’s auction. The blue-toned painting, which Klein executed using a sponge technique, was offered for £24 million ($30.2 million). Five bidders competed for the work, which sold for a final price of £27 million (US$33.4 million), going to one bidder who spoke to Christie’s London specialist Guy Agazarian on the phone. The result makes it one of Klein’s most valuable works to be auctioned, considering the price is still below his current record of $36.4 million, set by the sale in 2012 FC1 (Fire Color 1), ex 1962

A metallic pink Jeff Koons sculpture titled Balloon Monkey (Magenta), 2006–2013, was sold by Ukrainian-born billionaire philanthropist Victor Pinchuk and his wife Olena to raise money for medical care for Ukrainian soldiers during the ongoing war with Russia. The work sold for £10 million ($12.6 million), within its estimate.

The Koons was won by another mega collector, Copenhagen-based collector Jens Faurschou. In a post-sale statement, which referenced charitable initiatives in the art world, Faurschou said, “We need more.”

auction room

Christie’s specialists bid in the London showroom.
Courtesy of Christie’s

Rene Magritte travel souvenir (ca. 1962–63), depicting a gray stone apple and a crescent moon against a cloudy sky added some excitement to the sale. A prolonged bidding war between five bidders resulted in the work’s hammer price exceeding the high estimate of £5 million ($6 million). The work sold for a final price of £16 million (US$19.7 million) to a bidder who spoke to London-based Christie’s specialist Guy Agazarian on the phone.

Fresh off a new record set during last month’s New York tent auctions, Ernie Barnes was represented by Pool bar on the main street (1978), a nighttime bar scene. The painting jumped above its original estimate of £80,000 ($97,000) to fetch a final price of £1.5 million ($1.8 million).

Yves Klein, Anna Weyant Get Christie's

A sculpture by Simone Leigh, which received the Golden Lion at this year’s Venice Biennale, opened the event in London. The work, Untitled V (Anatomy of Architecture series), featuring a bust of a woman adorned with roses and straw, which sold for a double estimated final price of £724,500 ($880,000).

A 2003 painting in acrylic and graphite on canvas by Michel Majerus titled Milky Way, which features the work’s title in bold, fetched £403,000 ($490,000), more than double the estimate. Majerus is the subject of a survey at the KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin, which is scheduled to open in October.

Half of the living artist auction listings were made by women. A work by 27-year-old painter Anna Weyant, who recently joined Gagosian (the eponymous dealer is said to be her romantic partner), topped his estimate. Her painting from 2019 Ingrid with flowers sold for £403,000 ($490,000), more than double the estimate of £150,000.

Lucy Bull’s canvas 2019 No more blue mornings, an abstraction depicting seemingly organic forms, sold for £277,200 ($340,000), more than four times the low estimate of £60,000 ($73,000). The work was the latest in a series of paintings by Bull to exceed expectations at auction.

Leonora Carrington, whose writings gave the current Venice Biennale its title, was represented by ferret race (stoat race), which saw competition from three bidders. It went to a Hong Kong buyer for £1.4 million ($1.7 million). The result was still just short of the artist’s current record of $3.3 million paid The Garden of Paracelsus (1957) in May.

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Hidden Gem Ljubljana Best European Destination 2022 https://maoriart.net/hidden-gem-ljubljana-best-european-destination-2022/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 17:29:18 +0000 https://maoriart.net/hidden-gem-ljubljana-best-european-destination-2022/ Scenic Ljubljana, Slovenia seen from the Ljubljanica river Paul Allen/andphotography With a beautiful historic center built around a Venetian canal lined with bars and restaurants, Ljubljana is a real gem of a city. Recognized as Europe’s first ‘green’ city for introducing a pedestrian zone, the Slovenian capital Ljubljana is also so culturally rich that it’s […]]]>

With a beautiful historic center built around a Venetian canal lined with bars and restaurants, Ljubljana is a real gem of a city. Recognized as Europe’s first ‘green’ city for introducing a pedestrian zone, the Slovenian capital Ljubljana is also so culturally rich that it’s no surprise it was voted number one The best European travel destinations of 2022.

In 2022 Ljubljana will celebrate the 150th birthday of one of the greatest Slovenian architects, Jože Plečnik, the designer of their city. His architectural influence on Ljubljana has been compared to Antoni Gaudí’s influence on Barcelona. Landmarks he designed were recently inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List. When designing Ljubljana, Plečnik attempted to use modern approaches while modeling the city after ancient Athens. Its innovative style is characterized by the use of classic architectural elements such as pillars, lintels, balustrades and colonnades, redesigned and combined in the master architect’s particular way. Jože Plečnik also designed many well-known buildings in Vienna, Belgrade and Prague, including Prague Castle.

What to see and do

Quite plain from the outside, the exterior of J.Plečnik’s house belies the fascinating content inside. The permanent exhibition in the Plečnik House focuses on the life and work of this great architect, while temporary exhibitions present Plečnik’s works and artifacts from the Plečnik Collection. Visits to Plečnik’s house are only possible as part of a guided tour, so check the website for more information.

Ljubljana Castle on a hill above the city for about 900 years, is one of the main attractions of Ljubljana. The castle’s lookout tower and ramparts offer beautiful views, while the castle houses a museum exhibition on Slovenian history, a doll museum, as well as several historical rooms such as St. George’s Chapel and the prison. Visitors can buy the castle very well Wine produced in our own vineyard. And be sure to take the impressive modernity with you funicular to the castle to enjoy the view of the city as you climb. Designers Miha Kerin and Majda Kregar from design studio Ambient won a gold medal for the design of the funicular at the 2008 Ljubljana Biennale of Industrial Design.

In addition to the castle, a boat trip on the river that meanders through the city center is a must. To attempt Barca Lea which you can pick up from Butcher’s Bridge on the hour from 10am.

Newly opened Cukrarna Contemporary Gallery dates back to 1828 when it was a sugar refinery and the tallest building in town. The impressive warehouse now hosts temporary art exhibitions by international artists and a semi-permanent exhibition by five Slovenian artists, Lia Perjovschi, Marko Pogačnik, Tobias Putrih, Miha Štrukelj and Andrej Štular.

On a visit in April during Fashion week in Ljubljana, Tickets are available to the public. It’s a brilliant showcase of Slovenia’s established and fresh designers with some regional designer shows featuring brands and designers from Hungary, Austria, Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Czech Republic and Macedonia all presenting their collections. And this season there was even a London-based Japanese designer.

The latest edition of Ljubljana Design Biennale (the oldest in the world), organized by the Museum of Architecture and Design (MAO), runs until September 29, 2022. This year’s curator is British design consultant Jane Withers, who invited international designers to come up with imaginative answers to current challenges such as water scarcity find , waste and declining biodiversity. The Biennale is organized by the Museum of Architecture and Design in Ljubljana and is open from Tuesday to Sunday tickets 7 euros.

Where to shop

In the streets of the historic center there are many independent design shops. Check out designers like Princip, Kiss the Future and Made in Anselma who create handmade clothing from vintage materials. For an excellent manicure or facial, also downtown Estetika Mayakozmetični salon.

where should we eat

Chef Janez Bratovž’s restaurant is a visual and culinary delight for fine dining at its most creative. Introduced in the late 1990s in a historical gem by Jože Plečnik, JB restaurant was the first Slovenian restaurant to do that The 50 best restaurants in the world list and it continues to impress. The versatile six- and nine-course tasting menus are based on the four elements of earth, water, air and fire, which represent sweet, salty, sour and bitter tastes.

Just outside the city center kuboThe Mediterranean-influenced menu offers hearty pasta, excellent risotto and succulent lamb shanks. A popular choice with locals and well worth a visit.

Kavarna Rog is a hip cafe with excellent food and a great atmosphere. It’s a top lunch spot, with great salads and burgers, as well as a fantastic selection of cakes (the baked cheesecake is amazing).

For a lively atmosphere and fabulous cocktails, Nebo in the city center also has a good selection of seafood platters and Italian dishes.

Where to sleep

Grand Union Hotel in the heart of the old town has always attracted well-known politicians, actors and royalty, even Queen Elizabeth II. The characterful property dates back to 1905 and features lavish Art Nouveau architecture, whilst offering all the modern conveniences you would expect from a four-star – Expect hotel.

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The Dawson Creek artist shares her roots in the Prince George exhibit https://maoriart.net/the-dawson-creek-artist-shares-her-roots-in-the-prince-george-exhibit/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 20:02:59 +0000 https://maoriart.net/the-dawson-creek-artist-shares-her-roots-in-the-prince-george-exhibit/ PRINCE GEORGE, BC – Dawson Creek-based artist Haley Bassett showcased her Metis and Eastern European roots in her exhibition titled Maternal, can be viewed at the Two Rivers Gallery in Prince George. Bassett, an interdisciplinary artist and a pillar of the Peace Region arts scene, is executive director of the Peace Liard Regional Arts Council […]]]>

PRINCE GEORGE, BC – Dawson Creek-based artist Haley Bassett showcased her Metis and Eastern European roots in her exhibition titled Maternal, can be viewed at the Two Rivers Gallery in Prince George.

Bassett, an interdisciplinary artist and a pillar of the Peace Region arts scene, is executive director of the Peace Liard Regional Arts Council and program coordinator of Dawson Creek Art Gallery.

That’s what the gallery says matrilineal features a wide variety of art forms that illustrate Bassett’s wide range of skills, which she honed while studying at Emily Carr University and the Florence Academy of Art.

“Sculptural explosions of matryoshka dolls (aka Russian nesting
dolls) and textiles lovingly embroidered with beads tell a story of connectedness, community and permanence,” according to the gallery.

“By using feminized motifs such as roses, pearls and dolls, Bassett artfully shows the power and strength of traditions passed down through generations of women in her family. From this she draws the strength to find new ways to heal gender-based violence.”

matrilineal can be viewed in the gallery at the Rustaf Galleria until August 7th.

“We are so grateful to have the opportunity to support regional emerging artists at Rustad Galleria. We are thrilled to share this space with Haley Bassett and give the Prince George community the opportunity to learn more about her and her stunning work,” said Kait Herlehy, Associate Curator, Two Rivers Gallery.

Bassett, through her work at Dawson Creek Art Gallery, has also worked to develop programs to limit the barriers to artists and their professional development in peacetime.

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Why tensions between Russia and Lithuania are rising https://maoriart.net/why-tensions-between-russia-and-lithuania-are-rising/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 17:46:12 +0000 https://maoriart.net/why-tensions-between-russia-and-lithuania-are-rising/ New tensions between Moscow and the West are rising after Lithuania decided to stop transporting some goods through its territory to Russia’s Kaliningrad region as part of the European Union‘s sanctions against the Kremlin. Trucks stand at the Chernyshevskoye international post-customs checkpoint on the Russian-Lithuanian border in Kaliningrad region, Russia, Wednesday, June 22, 2022. Russia’s […]]]>

New tensions between Moscow and the West are rising after Lithuania decided to stop transporting some goods through its territory to Russia’s Kaliningrad region as part of the European Union‘s sanctions against the Kremlin.

Trucks stand at the Chernyshevskoye international post-customs checkpoint on the Russian-Lithuanian border in Kaliningrad region, Russia, Wednesday, June 22, 2022. Russia’s security chief said on Tuesday Moscow would respond to Lithuania’s decision to block rail transit of goods, those of the European Union are subject to Russia’s Union sanctions against Russia’s Baltic exclave of Kaliningrad. (AP photo)

Staff / AP

The Kremlin warns against fighting back against the sanctions stemming from its incursion into Ukraine in a way that will have “significant negative effects” on the Lithuanian people and fears of a direct confrontation between Russia and NATO will stoke.

A look at why tensions are rising around Kaliningrad, a part of Russia on the Baltic Sea that is cut off from the rest of the country:

Russia’s westernmost territory

The Kaliningrad region was once part of the German province of East Prussia, which was taken over by the Soviet Union after World War II as part of the 1945 Potsdam Agreement between the Allies. East Prussia’s capital, Königsberg, was renamed Kaliningrad after Mikhail Kalinin, a Bolshevik leader.

An estimated 2 million Germans fled the area in the final months of World War II, and those who remained were forcibly evicted after hostilities ended.

Soviet authorities developed Kaliningrad into a major ice-free port and fishing center, and encouraged people from other regions to move to the area. Since the Cold War era, Kaliningrad has also served as an important base for the Russian Baltic Fleet.

But since the collapse of the Soviet Union and the independence of the Baltic states, Kaliningrad has been separated from the rest of Russia by Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, all of which are now NATO members. To the south is Poland, another NATO member.

military bastion

As Russia’s relations with the West deteriorate, Kaliningrad’s military role has grown. Its location has put it at the forefront of Moscow’s efforts to counter what it called NATO’s hostile policies.

The Kremlin has methodically bolstered its forces there, arming them with cutting-edge weaponry, including precision-guided Iskander missiles and a range of air defense systems.

As the region’s military importance has grown, its reliance on goods coming through Poland and Lithuania has left it particularly vulnerable.

transit halted

Lithuania stressed that the ban on trade in sanctioned goods is part of the fourth package of EU sanctions against Russia, noting that from June 17 it will only apply to steel and ferrous metals.

The government in Vilnius dismissed Russia’s description of the move as a blockade, stressing that unauthorized goods and rail passengers could still travel through Lithuania.

In line with the EU decision, coal will be banned in August and the supply of oil and oil products will be halted in December.

Moscow is considering an answer

Moscow officially protested the halt to supplies to Kaliningrad in violation of the Russia-EU agreements on the free movement of goods to the region.

Kaliningrad Governor Anton Alikhanov said the ban will affect up to half of all items imported into the region, including cement and other building materials.

Nikolai Patrushev, the powerful secretary of the Russian Security Council and a close confidant of President Vladimir Putin, visited Kaliningrad on Tuesday to meet with local officials. He called the restrictions “hostile actions” and warned that Moscow would respond with unspecified measures that “will have a significant negative impact on the people of Lithuania.”

Patrushev did not elaborate, but Alikhanov suggested that the Russian response could be to stop the flow of cargo through the ports of Lithuania and other Baltic states.

However, Lithuania has significantly reduced its economic and energy dependency on Russia and recently became the first EU country to stop using Russian gas. It no longer imports Russian oil and has suspended imports of Russian electricity. Most of Russia’s transit through Lithuanian ports has already been stopped by EU sanctions, but Moscow may limit transit of third-country cargo through Lithuania.

Putin will decide Russia’s response after receiving Patrushev’s report.

Russia’s standoff with Lithuania is part of their troubled relationship, dating back to Moscow’s annexation of the country along with Estonia and Latvia in 1940. The three pushed their move toward independence under former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev and regained it when the USSR collapsed in 1991.

fears of escalation

Some in the West have long feared that Russia could consider military intervention to secure a land corridor between its ally Belarus and the Kaliningrad region via the so-called Suwalki Gap, a 65-kilometer strip of land along Poland’s border with Lithuania.

The rhetoric on Russian state television has risen to a high pitch, with commentator Vladimir Solovyov accusing the West of reckless moves that have ticked the clock on to World War III.

Lithuanian Defense Minister Arvydas Anusauskas on Wednesday warned of the risk of Russian provocations amid tensions in Kaliningrad. “Of course, if you have a military force and they are ruled by fools – I apologize for the expression – you can expect anything,” he said, adding that Lithuania is confident and counts on its NATO allies.

With most of Russia’s military stuck in Ukraine, any use of force in the Baltics could exceed Moscow’s capabilities for conventional weapons.

Estonian Prime Minister Kaja Kallas said she did not believe there was a military threat to Lithuania, adding that Russia was trying to pressure the EU to ease sanctions.

“Russia is very good at playing on our fears so that, you know, we back down from our decisions,” Kallas said in an interview with The Associated Press.

A Russian attempt to use force against Poland or Lithuania would trigger a direct conflict with NATO, which is obligated to protect each of its members under their charter’s mutual defense clause known as Article 5.

On Tuesday, US State Department spokesman Ned Price stressed Washington’s “ironically strong” commitment to the clause, which he described as NATO’s “fundamental principle.”

Russia’s Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov responded by warning the EU and NATO against “dangerous rhetorical games” over Kaliningrad. “Some influential and powerful forces in the West are doing everything in their power to further escalate tensions in relations with Russia,” he said, adding “some simply have no limits when it comes to inventing scenarios in which a military confrontation with us seems inevitable.”

Liudas Dapkus in Vilnius, Lithuania contributed.

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Theme, importance of the day https://maoriart.net/theme-importance-of-the-day/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 06:25:32 +0000 https://maoriart.net/theme-importance-of-the-day/ World Music Day 2022: The day was first celebrated in 1982. Music has never been more accessible than in today’s world. With just a tap on our smartphones, we can turn on our favorite songs by choosing the genres and artists we like to listen to. And that’s why World Music Day is of the […]]]>

World Music Day 2022: The day was first celebrated in 1982.

Music has never been more accessible than in today’s world. With just a tap on our smartphones, we can turn on our favorite songs by choosing the genres and artists we like to listen to. And that’s why World Music Day is of the utmost importance to today’s generation. World Music Day is celebrated on June 21st. The day honors the spirit of the music, the liveliness of the singing and the melody of the instruments. The day was first celebrated in France in 1982 as the Fete de la Musique. It was organized by then French Arts and Culture Minister Jack Lange and French composer Maurice Fleuret.

Theme of World Music Day 2022

The theme of World Music Day 2022 is “Music at the Crossroads”.

meaning

World Music Day was created to make music more accessible and consumable for the young generation. As early as 1982, Jack Lange and Maurice Fleuret noted that the music of the time was not representative of youth playing instruments. Therefore, they planned to plan a concert in the public space of Paris with the help of the architect and scenographer Christian Dupavillon. The concert took place on June 21st this year and celebrated the presence of professional and amateur musicians from different corners of France.

In 1985, also referred to as the European Year of Music, other nations took over this annual concert to celebrate music and music artists. In 1997, a charter was signed at the European Music Festival in Budapest, which recognized the day internationally as World Music Day.

How do you celebrate World Music Day?

Music artists around the world organize concerts on World Music Day. Celebrations are no longer limited to European nations. In fact, the day is celebrated by 120 countries including India, Italy, Greece, Russia, Australia, Peru, Brazil, Ecuador, Mexico, Canada, United States, United Kingdom, Japan, China and Malaysia. Festivals, parades, fairs, festivals and dance parties are often an integral part of World Music Day.

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NATO warns of long war in Ukraine as Russian attacks follow EU push for Kyiv https://maoriart.net/nato-warns-of-long-war-in-ukraine-as-russian-attacks-follow-eu-push-for-kyiv/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 04:19:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/nato-warns-of-long-war-in-ukraine-as-russian-attacks-follow-eu-push-for-kyiv/ NATO’s Stoltenberg says the war could last for years Allies must show they will support Ukraine in the long run – Johnson Ukraine concedes a backlash in a village near Sievierodonetsk “Everything that belongs to us, we take back” – Zelenskiy Two Azovstal defense commanders moved to Russia for investigation – TASS Kyiv, June 19 […]]]>
  • NATO’s Stoltenberg says the war could last for years
  • Allies must show they will support Ukraine in the long run – Johnson
  • Ukraine concedes a backlash in a village near Sievierodonetsk
  • “Everything that belongs to us, we take back” – Zelenskiy
  • Two Azovstal defense commanders moved to Russia for investigation – TASS

Kyiv, June 19 (Reuters) – The war in Ukraine could last for years, the NATO chief said on Sunday, as Russia stepped up its attacks after the European Union recommended that Kyiv should become a candidate to join the bloc .

Jens Stoltenberg said supplying state-of-the-art weapons to Ukrainian troops would increase the chance of liberating the eastern Donbass region from Russian control, German newspaper Bild am Sonntag said. Continue reading

“We have to be prepared for the fact that it can take years. We must not let up in our support for Ukraine,” the secretary general of the military alliance, Stoltenberg, was quoted as saying.

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“Even if the costs are high, not only for military support, but also because of rising energy and food prices.”

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who visited Kyiv on Friday, also spoke of the need to prepare for a long war.

This meant ensuring that “Ukraine gets arms, equipment, ammunition and training faster than the invader,” Johnson wrote in an opinion piece in London’s Sunday Times.

“Time is of the essence,” he wrote. “Everything will depend on whether Ukraine can strengthen its ability to defend its soil faster than Russia can renew its attacking capability.”

Ukraine received a significant boost on Friday when the European Commission recommended it candidate status, a decision EU nations are expected to endorse at a summit this week. Continue reading

That would put Ukraine on track to achieve a goal that seemed unattainable before Russia’s February 24 invasion, even if membership might take years.

POWERED ATTACKS

Russian attacks on the battlefields of Ukraine intensified.

The industrial city of Sievierodonetsk, a key target of Moscow’s offensive to seize full control of Luhansk – one of the two provinces of Donbass – again came under heavy artillery and rocket fire, the Ukrainian military said.

“The situation in Sievierodonetsk is very difficult,” said Serhiy Gaidai, the Ukraine-appointed governor of Luhansk, adding that Russian forces, which use drones for aerial reconnaissance, quickly adjust their attacks in response to defense changes.

“Areas near the bridges were again heavily shelled,” Gaidai said in an online post on Sunday, adding that the Azot chemical plant, where hundreds of people had taken shelter, was hit twice.

“The struggle for full control of the city continues,” the General Staff of Ukraine’s Armed Forces said in a daily update on Sunday.

Analysts at the Washington Institute for the Study of War think tank wrote that “Russian forces will likely be able to capture Sievierodonetsk in the coming weeks, but at the cost of concentrating most of their available forces in this small area”.

In Sievierodonetsk’s sister city of Lysychansk, across the river, the bodies of two civilians were found, Gaidai said, adding: “The destruction of apartments in the city is increasing like an avalanche.”

The Ukrainian military admitted that “the enemy in the village of Metolkine”, south-east of Sievierodonetsk, was partially successful.

Russia’s state news agency TASS said many Ukrainian militants surrendered in Metolkine, citing a source working for Russian-backed separatists.

Russian rockets hit a gas works in the northwest’s Izyum district, and Russian rockets raining on a suburb of Kharkiv, the second-biggest city, hit a municipal building, causing a fire but no casualties, Ukrainian authorities said.

They reported shelling further west in Poltava and Dnipropetrovsk and said on Saturday that three Russian missiles destroyed a fuel depot in the city of Novomoskovsk, injuring 11 people. Continue reading

Pavlo Kyrylenko, governor of Donetsk, the other province in Donbass, said one civilian was killed and 11 injured in shelling on Saturday.

The General Staff of Ukraine’s Armed Forces said Russian troops on a reconnaissance mission near the town of Krasnopillya were repelled with heavy casualties on Saturday.

Reuters could not independently confirm the battlefield reports.

Two senior commanders of fighters defending the Azovstal Steel Plant in the southeastern port of Mariupol have been transferred to Russia for investigation, TASS said. Continue reading

SELENSKIY DESPITE

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, whose resistance has inspired his people and won respect around the world, said he visited soldiers on the southern front in the Mykolayiv region, some 550 km (340 miles) south of Kyiv.

“I spoke to our defenders – the military, the police, the National Guard,” he said in a video on news app Telegram on Sunday that appeared to have been taken on a moving train.

“Your mood is secure: none of you doubts our victory,” Zelenskyj said. “We will not give the South to anyone, and everything that is ours we will take back.”

Another video showed Zelenskiy in his signature khaki T-shirt, presenting medals and posing for selfies with soldiers. Continue reading

Zelenskyy has been mostly in Kyiv since the Russian invasion, although he has made unannounced visits to Kharkiv and two eastern cities near battles in recent weeks. Continue reading

One of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s stated goals when he ordered troops into Ukraine was to halt the eastward expansion of the North Atlantic Treaty Alliance and keep Moscow’s southern neighbors out of the West’s sphere of influence.

But the war, which has killed thousands, reduced cities to rubble and forced millions to flee, had the opposite effect – it convinced Finland and Sweden to seek NATO membership – and helped pave the way for the EU – to pave the way for Ukraine’s bid for membership.

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Reporting by Reuters bureaus; writing by David Brunnstrom and Clarence Fernandez; Edited by Grant McCool and William Mallard

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Policy.

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West Midlands signs 10-year strategic framework agreement with GEF – European Gaming News https://maoriart.net/west-midlands-signs-10-year-strategic-framework-agreement-with-gef-european-gaming-news/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 06:04:47 +0000 https://maoriart.net/west-midlands-signs-10-year-strategic-framework-agreement-with-gef-european-gaming-news/ reading time: 3 protocol The West Midlands have agreed a 10-year Strategic Framework Agreement (SFA) with the Global Esports Federation (GEF), accelerating the region’s commitment to fostering international growth in the rapidly evolving industry. The partnership will see the West Midlands join a network of global hubs including, but not limited to, GEF’s Singapore headquarters […]]]>
reading time: 3 protocol

The West Midlands have agreed a 10-year Strategic Framework Agreement (SFA) with the Global Esports Federation (GEF), accelerating the region’s commitment to fostering international growth in the rapidly evolving industry.

The partnership will see the West Midlands join a network of global hubs including, but not limited to, GEF’s Singapore headquarters and further developments in Brazil, China, Turkey, Japan, the Middle East, Africa and the Americas.

The agreement, led by West Midlands Growth Company (WMGC), will cement the region’s position as a hotbed for the esports and gaming industry, with the West Midlands already responsible for a quarter of UK production in the sector.

The partnership builds on the West Midlands’ position as the gaming and esports hub within the UK, with the region being home to a total of 130 gaming companies – mostly based around Leamington Spa – including Codemasters, Ubisoft, Playground and Sega Hardlight among others .

The industry employs more than 3,000 games professionals in the region. The University of Warwick was recently named UK Esports University of the Year for the fourth consecutive year after investing heavily in state-of-the-art facilities and talent.

Premier League club Wolverhampton Wanderers are also heavily committed to esports, hosting their own esports organization with teams in the UK, Europe and China and last year announcing a partnership with North American esports giants Evil Geniuses.

Paul J. Foster, CEO of the Global Esports Federation, said, “GEF President Chris Chan and the entire Board of Directors of the Global Esports Federation have strategic global hubs as anchors for our development of esports, sports, immersive technologies, innovative entertainment, and related sectors. Leadership in the West Midlands continues to demonstrate a strong shared ambition and the diverse capabilities of this dynamic region. Through our partnership with the Commonwealth Games Federation for the upcoming Commonwealth Esports Championships and this historic Strategic Framework Agreement, we are proud to bring our support, expertise and strong, tangible commitment to this region and to unlocking a decade of limitless opportunity and growth accelerating the people and businesses lucky enough to call it home.”

Andy Street, Mayor of the West Midlands said: “I was thrilled when we confirmed that the first-ever Commonwealth Esports Championships would be held right here in the West Midlands this summer and this exciting partnership with the Global Esports Federation shows the scale of ours Region’s goal – to become a global leader in the world’s fastest growing entertainment sector. We are fortunate to already have big gaming names on our doorstep such as Sega Hardlight and Codemasters, all contributing to the West Midlands’ growing status as an eSports hub. Now we’re taking the next step by partnering with the Global Esports Federation to drive investment and create high-quality, cutting-edge jobs in this incredibly dynamic sector. These are important times for the West Midlands and I can’t wait to see this sector continue to thrive.”

Ian Ward, Chairman of Birmingham City Council, said: “With Birmingham and the wider West Midlands synonymous with youth, vibrancy and pioneering new innovation, our region is well positioned as the new strategic hub for British esports. Through our partnership with the Global Esports Federation, we are turning this fast-growing, global economic and cultural opportunity into a regional growth plan. The 10-year commitment will help us host more major events in the city and drive international visitor numbers to the region, and includes the development of a new esports innovation and research center that has the potential to strengthen local technology capacities. We look forward to bringing eSports to a new audience of fans and talent right here in Birmingham, beginning with the inaugural Commonwealth eSports Championships this August.”

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Live News Updates: Retail sales in China fall for third straight month https://maoriart.net/live-news-updates-retail-sales-in-china-fall-for-third-straight-month/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 05:10:19 +0000 https://maoriart.net/live-news-updates-retail-sales-in-china-fall-for-third-straight-month/ ©Bloomberg Retail sales in China fell for the third straight month in May as lockdowns as part of President Xi Jinping’s zero-Covid strategy dampened growth in the world’s second-largest economy. Retail sales fell 6.7 percent from the same period last year, according to official figures, but still beat the 7.1 percent decline forecast by analysts […]]]>

©Bloomberg

Retail sales in China fell for the third straight month in May as lockdowns as part of President Xi Jinping’s zero-Covid strategy dampened growth in the world’s second-largest economy.

Retail sales fell 6.7 percent from the same period last year, according to official figures, but still beat the 7.1 percent decline forecast by analysts polled by Reuters.

This was a slight improvement from April’s reading, when authorities in Shanghai implemented strict lockdowns and sales fell 11.1 percent. Sales were also largely flat compared to April.

But China’s industrial production, which measures output from the country’s mines, factories and utilities sector, rebounded in May, up 0.7 percent from the same period last year. Analysts had predicted a drop of the same amount.

The National Bureau of Statistics said the recovery in industrial production was driven by growth in production of new energy vehicles and solar cells, which rose 108.3 percent and 31.4 percent year-on-year, respectively. Retail sales, meanwhile, were dragged down by a 21.1 percent drop in catering spending.

The figures underscore how hard China has been struggling to motivate its consumers to continue spending despite strict lockdown restrictions that mean some are unable to go to work or visit shops or restaurants.

Other official figures released on Wednesday showed that home sales in the country, by value, were down 41.7 percent from the same period last year.

The country’s property developers were already struggling to contain a spreading liquidity crisis ahead of the imposition of strict lockdowns in the country’s main cities in April and May.

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‘Germany was 10 years behind’: How Brexit helped Europe’s galleries | art and design https://maoriart.net/germany-was-10-years-behind-how-brexit-helped-europes-galleries-art-and-design/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/germany-was-10-years-behind-how-brexit-helped-europes-galleries-art-and-design/ One of the things Stephanie Rosenthal has acquired over her 10 years in the London gallery world is an appreciation for the British art of queuing with a smile on her face. After the German art historian left her job as chief curator of the Hayward Gallery in the wake of the British referendum on […]]]>

One of the things Stephanie Rosenthal has acquired over her 10 years in the London gallery world is an appreciation for the British art of queuing with a smile on her face.

After the German art historian left her job as chief curator of the Hayward Gallery in the wake of the British referendum on leaving the European Union, she exported her specialist knowledge back to her native country.

Since Rosenthal took charge of Berlin’s Gropius Bau in 2018, those lining up at her gallery to buy a ticket can hope to be amused and entertained by one of the 12 “friends” she hired to help to meet and greet visitors.

Those who don’t want to wait can stroll straight into the atrium to check out a free sound installation by Nigerian artist Emeka Ogboh, another symbol of change introduced under Rosenthal’s tenure. The Gropius Bau used to represent a German tradition of ivory tower galleries where visitors were tolerated rather than welcomed. Security would make them feel that way.

Today, entering the 19th-century palatial building on the border of Berlin’s Kreuzberg and Mitte districts is more reminiscent of entering a London exhibition space such as the Royal Festival Hall or the Tate Modern.

“In England, it was always about having a low entry threshold,” Rosenthal said. “The gallery’s question was: ‘How can culture influence our everyday thinking?’ instead of: ‘Take these stairs and then the culture will reveal itself to you.’ We were 10 years behind in Germany.”

Stephanie Rosenthal, director of the Gropius Bau. Photo: Gropius Bau

When Britain voted to leave the EU on June 23, 2016, the result shocked many European citizens who had made Britain their adopted country. Six years later, many have returned to the countries where they grew up. However, it is also becoming increasingly clear that the lessons learned are transforming continental European cities in unexpected ways.

For Germans, this is particularly true of the UK arts and museums sector, which has long been a popular destination for graduates from a country that regularly produces more art historians than it can offer jobs. The British Museum, the V&A and the Tate Liverpool have or had directors with German passports.

Stefan Kalmár, 52, spent a total of 17 years in England after swapping the University of Hildesheim for a goldsmith in 1996, then headed the Institute of Visual Culture in Cambridge, London’s Cubitt Gallery and finally the capital’s renowned Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA ) from 2016 to 2021.

He recalled a “utopian period” between the mid-1990s and early 2000s, when “London was on course to become Europe’s New York”. “Britain has totally shaped my idea of ​​culture.”

But the Brexit referendum marked a turning point for Kalmár, the son of an East German mother and a Hungarian father. “Even before the Brexit vote, I had the feeling that island thinking was creeping in again – it was much more extreme than I had imagined from New York.” Even in the globalized London art scene, he recalled, colleagues had derogatory remarks made about “foreigners” that often went unchallenged.

The culture wars, which intensified in the years after the split vote, also took away the joy of the job, said Kalmár. While the ICA is only 21% funded by public funds – compared to 70% to 80% at comparable German institutions – the multidisciplinary venue was still perceived as largely state-backed, and provocative programs could spark angry right-wing letters of complaint that prompted careful legal responses required .

The lack of an American donor culture and tax break regime, he said, means that British arts organizations are “getting the worst of both worlds”.

Stefan Kalmar.
Stefan Kalmár spent 17 years in England and now lives in Marseille. Photo: Manifesta

“In the end, you essentially run a subsidized company and not a civic institution. The mixed economy model forces you to be a lot more commercial than you’d like – you spend all your time trying to figure out how to make more money out of your bookstore or your coffee shop, and that ends up consuming a lot of the energy that you would rather invest in focusing on the program.”

Kalmár now lives in Marseille, France, where he runs a curatorial production office, and said he’s begun to renew his appreciation for France’s and Germany’s approach to the arts, particularly when he’s seen how quickly and unbureaucratically the state has been supporting cultural institutions during the Pandemic while UK organizations struggled.

“It’s a completely different approach than what we see as public service. A German museum can close for four weeks to install a new exhibition – that is completely unthinkable in Great Britain.”

Even then, many German directors and curators, who learned their craft in the more commercial but also audience-oriented art world of Great Britain, remained ambivalent. “Sometimes I struggle with my own reasoning: financially strong German museums should be role models for civic engagement. And all too often, unfortunately, they are not.”

“The approach here [in Berlin] “Even an exhibition that doesn’t attract that many visitors can be valuable,” said Rosenthal, who is leaving Berlin in the fall to head the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. “Culture is seen as an important tool for critical thinking. But on the other hand, London has taught me that a blockbuster show doesn’t have to be a bad show.” Under her direction, Berlin’s largest gallery hosted a blockbuster show by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama.

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Anna Gritz first came to London in 2002 as part of an Erasmus program and later returned to the Hayward and the South London Gallery as a curator. Since the beginning of June she has been the new director of the Haus am Waldsee, an art house built in the English country house style in the posh Zehlendorf district of Berlin.

“One thing I learned in the UK is that art doesn’t just happen in the exhibition spaces,” Gritz said. “Art can also be what a gallery does with the local community in its neighborhood.”

Educational programs designed to bring more audiences from socially disadvantaged backgrounds to galleries are still relatively new in the German gallery and museum world. At the Southbank Centre, Rosenthal said she has a department of 30 people working to reach such new audiences. At the Gropius Bau, she increased the number of field staff to three – from zero.

At Haus am Waldsee, Gritz planned to recruit an outreach curator and bring more children and youth into a gallery that currently has its most trusted retiree audience.

“I didn’t leave London because of Brexit,” she said.

“But in hindsight, the reasons I didn’t stay may be related to that. And yet I liked being a foreigner,” she added. “Sometimes I miss it.”

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Scots obituaries: Brian McCluskey | The Scot https://maoriart.net/scots-obituaries-brian-mccluskey-the-scot/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 06:04:45 +0000 https://maoriart.net/scots-obituaries-brian-mccluskey-the-scot/ Brian McCluskey, who recently died in Bordeaux, attained the highest rank of Scot ever to have worked for the European Union. A committed European and gifted linguist, he became Director General of the EU Translation Service, overseeing around 2,000 staff. After Brexit, which was very difficult for him, Brian and his wife Maureen took on […]]]>

Brian McCluskey, who recently died in Bordeaux, attained the highest rank of Scot ever to have worked for the European Union. A committed European and gifted linguist, he became Director General of the EU Translation Service, overseeing around 2,000 staff.

After Brexit, which was very difficult for him, Brian and his wife Maureen took on French citizenship. Ode to Joy was played at the funeral in Bordeaux, where her son Stephen delivered the eulogy partly in French. Describing Brian as “the Kenny Dalglish of translation,” Stephen described how, as part of the post-WWII generation, Brian became passionate about the work of building understanding and cooperation between European nations.

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Brian first showed his talent for languages ​​in 1955 on a trip to Munich. Along with his classmate, environmental artist David Harding, Brian was chosen to represent Edinburgh’s Holy Cross Academy as part of a friendship exchange between the city’s and Munich’s schools. Brian learned Latin, Greek and French at school – German was not offered. But Brian taught himself to be fluent in German ahead of the two-week trip. Harding said: “We went to the ballet and the opera, we went to the Alps. It was life changing for both of us.”

Committed European Brian McCluskey found Brexit extremely troubling

Brian was Dux of Holy Cross and first in his class at Edinburgh University, graduating in 1959 with first place and gold medal in English. As a member of the university’s Dialectical Society, he was assigned to look after W.H. Auden and was fond of recounting how he had to fend off the famous poet’s advances.

Brian took exams for the Foreign Office and did very well, but was not offered a job. A University of Edinburgh professor accused the authorities of anti-Catholic discrimination. This was reported in the press at the time, but Brian rarely mentioned it as he felt he had found a direction that suited him better.

During his national service, Brian returned to his old university for a dance, where he met Maureen, a student at the time. Maureen turned down his dance offer because she was about to leave. But since they had mutual friends, they soon renewed their acquaintance. To impress her, Brian donned his full uniform to visit Maureen while she was in the hospital with appendicitis. The pair quickly found that they were on the same wavelength. Both were keen on traveling the world and as it turned out, Maureen was also gifted in languages.

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Obituaries: Pastor Dr. John Cameron, vicar and faithful Scotsman Letters

Brian resisted family pressures to study law – there were many lawyers in the family including his uncle John, Lord McCluskey. Brian’s brother Dominic qualified as a solicitor first in Scotland and then in France, where he was called to assist the British Embassy on the night Diana, Princess of Wales, died in Paris.

But Brian had decided that his destiny lay outside his home country and that translation was his calling. Brian and Maureen left Scotland on their wedding day after their wedding breakfast in 1962, never to live there again. While living in London, Brian taught himself Dutch and got a job as a translator for Shell in the Netherlands. Maureen also learned the language fluently. “When Brian spoke Dutch, people thought he was Dutch. Being Scots made it easier for him as some of the sounds are similar,” said Maureen. Brian spoke about 16 languages, some of them fluently. “He loved languages. He was fascinated by the different ways they find solutions to communication problems.”

When Britain and Ireland both joined the Common Market in 1973, Brian was excited and optimistic about the future. He jumped at the chance to join the EU’s new English language department. In 1980 he was appointed Director of the English Department and in 1999 Director General of the Translation Department, a position he held until his retirement in 2002. Brian was a kind, polite man and a considerate manager of his team.

Brian’s lifelong friend David Kemp, a classmate at Edinburgh University, was a frequent visitor and after Brian retired the couple made annual trips to Berlin to attend opera and concerts. Brian and David also loved art and they visited art galleries across Europe together. Once when they were at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam with Maureen, two young women passed and Brian followed them. Fearing a midlife crisis, David asked Maureen, “Does he do that often?” “Oh, it’ll be a language,” she replied, and when he came back half an hour later, she asked him, “What was that?” “Albanian,” he replied. At home in Bordeaux, he rarely encountered Albanian speakers and took the opportunity to chat.

Brian’s brothers Dominic and Christopher predeceased him, as did a son, Kenneth. He is survived by wife Maureen, son Stephen, daughter Karen, sisters Phil and Angela and ten grandchildren.

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