European Art – Maori Art http://maoriart.net/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 09:40:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://maoriart.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png European Art – Maori Art http://maoriart.net/ 32 32 Joe Feddersen’s printmaking and basketwork blends indigenous traditions with the present | Art & Culture | Spoken | The Pacific Northwest Inlander https://maoriart.net/joe-feddersens-printmaking-and-basketwork-blends-indigenous-traditions-with-the-present-art-culture-spoken-the-pacific-northwest-inlander/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 09:40:21 +0000 https://maoriart.net/joe-feddersens-printmaking-and-basketwork-blends-indigenous-traditions-with-the-present-art-culture-spoken-the-pacific-northwest-inlander/ click to enlarge Joe Feddersen’s artwork uses familiar depictions of the country, both urban and rural. Joe Feddersen works in multiple mediums Mixed media – printmaking, glass, basketwork – but above all he sees himself as a storyteller, he says. And that shows in his artwork, particularly the three works it contains indie folk. For […]]]>

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Joe Feddersen’s artwork uses familiar depictions of the country, both urban and rural.

Joe Feddersen works in multiple mediums Mixed media – printmaking, glass, basketwork – but above all he sees himself as a storyteller, he says. And that shows in his artwork, particularly the three works it contains indie folk.

For titles like Blue Chief at Elk Crossing and Red Star, the mixed media monoprints (a form of printmaking where the image can only be printed once) were printed and then spray paint and collage elements were added. Feddersen, who was born in Omak, also uses stencils to repeat certain images—abstract moose, a canoe, human figures, trees, geometric patterns—referring to the land he grew up on, as well as displays of modern influence mankind on the land high voltage pylons.

The result is artworks rich in symbolism, some more open, others more difficult to interpret. That, says Feddersen, is intentional.

“One thing about Native American stories is that there are multiple stories, there are multiple interpretations of stories,” says Feddersen, a member of the Okanagan and Arrow Lakes bands of the Colville Confederated Tribes.

“When you’re telling a legend or a Native American story, there’s no morality, you know, that sort of thing [there is] in European stories,” says Feddersen, whose paternal family is of German descent. “In a Native American story, it’s more like a horoscope; You read it and refer to it in your own experience for meaning.

Feddersen also has several baskets with him indie folk, which combine traditional wicker shapes and wicker materials with unconventional imagery, like top-down parking lot lines.

These abstract little images read like historical pictograms, he says indie folk Curator Melissa Feldman, who describes that Feddersen is one of the artists in the exhibition “who is interested in showing how traditional images don’t just belong in a historical setting or context”.

“I often think that if something is repeated in my work, then it’s about representing the world around me,” says Feddersen.

Sometimes his inspiration comes from a conversation or a news article. Vehicle tires with seductive names such as “Eagle” or “Open Country” inspired another basket series by Feddersen, which is not on display in the exhibition. Featuring the graphic patterns of SUV tire tracks, it reflects how the Western ethos is both romanticized and commercialized.

His imagery feels as natural as his interest in making things, says Feddersen, who loved art as a young man but didn’t get serious about it until his early 30s.

In 1983, Feddersen earned his BFA in printmaking from the University of Washington, followed a few years later by his MFA from the University of Wisconsin.

Feddersen now has works in the permanent collections of numerous cities and universities in the Northwest, as well as in such venerable institutions as the Smithsonian/National Museum of the American Indian and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

“Coming from a rural area, I didn’t really understand the art world,” says Feddersen. “I didn’t really know if you could do that His an artist.” ♦

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Eiteljorg Museum presents Native American art in a new way | Messages https://maoriart.net/eiteljorg-museum-presents-native-american-art-in-a-new-way-messages/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 21:53:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/eiteljorg-museum-presents-native-american-art-in-a-new-way-messages/ INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Tues Eiteljörg Museum The revamped Native American Galleries of will feature works spanning more than 170 years when it reopens in June. But visitors don’t start at the beginning, in the middle, or even at the end of that time frame. Instead, they are greeted by artworks with stories that blend past, […]]]>






INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Tues Eiteljörg Museum The revamped Native American Galleries of will feature works spanning more than 170 years when it reopens in June. But visitors don’t start at the beginning, in the middle, or even at the end of that time frame. Instead, they are greeted by artworks with stories that blend past, present, and future.

Hannah Claus’ Water Song: peemitanaahkwahki sakaahkweelo, for example, wraps the origin story of the Miami people in a work she created as a 2019 Contemporary Art Fellow at Eiteljorg. She took photos in her homelands in the Mississinewa and Wabash river basins between Marion, Peru and Wabash.

In the process, Claus, who is a member of the Bay of Quinte Mohawks First Nation, researched the story of how the Miami first made its way out of the water into what is now northern Indiana and southern Michigan, grabbing branches and pulling herself onto the country to go. Digital images, printed in the form of discs on acetate film, hang delicately from threads attached to the ceiling, reflecting the story and the sound waves of a song written above.

“Water Song” will be an introduction to approximately 300 artworks, with more being added to the installation over time, telling the story of tribes from across North America through a themed presentation that focuses on Aboriginal cultural values ​​in the galleries puts.

“Native American art is on that continuum of what’s considered older or traditional and what’s newer or contemporary—it’s all Native art and they inform each other,” said Dorene Red Cloud, Associate Curator of Native American Art.

The piece will also stand amidst spoken greetings from the Great Lakes tribes and a written acknowledgment of the peoples – including the Miami, Potawatomi, Delaware, Shawnee, Peoria and Kickapoo – who are the original inhabitants of the land the museum now stands on .

The reconstructed Indian Galleries are part of Eiteljorg’s larger Project 2021, a $55 million fundraiser that will expand his endowment and redesign galleries and event spaces. Of particular interest to people from this region is the focus on the Great Lakes Native Americans, which is expanding after the museum acquired a large collection of their art in 2019.

“This is really transformative for the museum. We’ve been traveling a certain way for 30 years, and now we’re looking at art differently and presenting it to the public in a very different way,” said President and CEO John Vanausdall. “It’s going to look so dramatically different and I think it’s a lot more contemporary and inviting for today.”

Prior to the renovation, Native American art was housed in large wooden boxes that were categorized according to their geography, including the forests, plains, Great Basin, and desert southwest. The floor plan was largely the same as it had been since 1989, when the Eiteljorg opened.

Working with his national Native American Advisory Council, the Eiteljorg developed a new vision for the galleries structured around the themes of relationship, continuity and innovation important to all Native American cultures.

Artworks—including jewelry, pottery, prints, portraits, ribbons, and beadwork—are displayed in showcases that open up the space greatly.

“One of the biggest changes from the old exhibition to the new installation is looking at the art through these three main themes, because before that – like many other museums – we took an anthropological look at the art and the people and the cultures and really categorized people by geography areas. So there were people from the prairie, people from the Southwest,” said Elisa Phelps, the vice president and chief curator.

“It’s really a non-native perspective on the arts, the cultures and the peoples.”

The relationship theme explores the connections to spirits, animals, plants, families, communities and nations. Red Cloud said that Native American creation or origin stories will be part of this section. Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado and Cahokia Mounds, east of St. Louis, are among places that are the ancestors of modern-day tribes but aren’t properly recognized as such, she said.

“Native people have lived in North America for thousands of years. And when European settlers came to America, they saw these hills and other places and did not honor the native people who lived there,” Red Cloud said. “If you talk to indigenous people who are from these areas, they will tell you, ‘Oh, these are our relatives, these were our ancestors.'”

Continuation celebrates the practices and customs of indigenous peoples who thrive despite assimilation efforts, while it examines forced resettlement and resettlement, and the schools designed to rid children of their culture. Finally, innovation involves the entrepreneurship of local artists in creating and selling their work.

About 15% of the galleries’ artwork comes from the collection Eiteljorg previously acquired from art dealer Richard Pohrt Jr. The items created by the Great Lakes Native Americans in the mid-19th and early 20th centuries provide a broader understanding of Indiana’s past and present.

Pohrt’s new art adds a variety of different works to the museum’s existing Great Lakes collection, which has been small compared to others to date, according to PR manager Bryan Corbin. The Eiteljorg had exhibited some of this work from Miami, Delaware and Potawatomi in Mitohseenionki: The People’s Place since 2002. Now some of these items will be on display in the reconstructed galleries.

Other Miami and Potawatomi artworks previously shown at the galleries were on loan and returned after nearly 20 years of display.

This section of the reinstallation focuses on tribal connections to the Great Lakes, as well as current environmental issues such as pipelines in the region and the repatriation of seed varieties to their place of origin in indigenous communities.

Artworks by people from the Great Lakes and surrounding areas will be drawn through the newly installed galleries and given special prominence in the Connected By Water room. With a dark ceiling and walls, artworks such as textiles and moccasins are housed in lighted boxes.

“You’re going to be in this jewel box-like environment,” Phelps said.

Given the sensitivity of many works to light, the art will rotate, which will help the museum show more of the more than 400 objects from the Pohrt collection, Phelps said.

The tribes’ artistry and skill will be evident, and Red Cloud said the exhibit will provide an opportunity to teach their spiritual beliefs through imagery used in the works, such as those of thunderbirds and underwater panthers. Here, too, past and present come together through works such as a turn-of-the-20th-century bandolier bag with floral beadwork, an art form that continues.

On “the bandolier bags you see a lot of floral patterns – flowers and plants. They are based on people’s knowledge of plants, you know what kind of plants are useful for use as medicine or for food,” Red Cloud said. “The floral beadwork is only found in the Great Lakes area, and artists are still making it today.”

Gallery construction is underway as the Eiteljorg moves into the final fundraising phase of the 2021 project. In October, the museum announced its goal of raising more than $6 million by May, after receiving nearly $49 million during the private phase that began in 2016. The money — $40 million — will be added to its endowment . The remaining $15 million will go to the capital campaign.

The latter includes, alongside the Native American Galleries, the reconstruction of the Western Art Galleries, which reopened in 2018; renovation of the Nina Mason Pulliam Education Center, which reopened in November; and the future expansion of the Allen Whitehill Clowes Sculpture Court event space. Corbin said the museum has so far achieved more than 90% of its overall goal.

Audio descriptions, digital tools, information easily readable for wheelchair users and special lighting for the visually impaired will make the galleries more accessible. Visitors can also touch parts of the exhibitions.

Additions include videos by local artists explaining their work. Those voices are key to telling the stories of the art and the people behind it, Phelps said. Even amid ongoing painful situations in Native American history, Red Cloud said the galleries will show the endurance and joy of their cultures.

“People are still culturally alive and viable, which is reflected in art,” she said. “Art practices are still continuing and evolving, and that’s when we come to innovate and truly celebrate Aboriginal art and diversity.”

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Saturday, January 15, 2022 – The monocle minute https://maoriart.net/saturday-january-15-2022-the-monocle-minute/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 06:08:39 +0000 https://maoriart.net/saturday-january-15-2022-the-monocle-minute/ We are working on a big project that will start this spring: a Monocle book with photography and reporting. It looks back at some of the great stories filmed for the magazine and is directed by our creative director, Richard, and our cinematographer, Matt. There’s still a long way to go and some tough decisions […]]]>

We are working on a big project that will start this spring: a Monocle book with photography and reporting. It looks back at some of the great stories filmed for the magazine and is directed by our creative director, Richard, and our cinematographer, Matt. There’s still a long way to go and some tough decisions to make, but this week we’re at the point where almost every page has been designed once. It’s the point in a book project where we staff the canteen, put printouts on the tables, and go through everything to see if the order is working, if the cornerstones and passions are covered, if the mix of places makes sense. Also on the road are Joe, Molly and Amy from the book team.

Many of the images shown never made it into the published editions of the magazine – images from a city just before the war crumpled them up; Shots in a Failed Nation; somber images captured behind the scenes at a news channel. The pace at which each magazine operates means it’s difficult to remember all of the stories you’ve covered. And on the cusp of our 15th anniversary, it was both sobering and satisfying to see the work spread across those canteen tables.

When we started Monocle, our goal was to bring words and images together to tell stories. The idea was to not only use images to illustrate the words, but to allow a photographer to provide an almost parallel story. Especially with the Expos, our large free-running glossy part, a photographer often worked alone and was allowed to see and show things that the author might not have covered in the text. At other times, a writer and a photographer worked as a close team and holed up on epic journeys. It’s an approach that has helped make Monocle a magazine known for still giving a photographer 16 pages with a single story, encouraging them to work with film and trust their eye.

As I reviewed all of this work, I also realized how some of these images had a profound, almost subconscious effect on me. The city that soon crumpled was Aleppo in Syria; This story was filmed by Roderick Aichinger in 2009 when the place was thriving and trying to be more open. Here is an old school travel agency; waiters with ribbons hanging around the roof of the Mirage Hotel; a cool young woman smoking in a cafe. What happened to all these people? What was her destiny? When Aleppo was ravaged by civil war, just looking at these images made me feel a strange connection to the city. It is the power of photography to connect viewer and subject, seer and seen, even if they will never meet.

On a side note, it’s hard to imagine that almost two years ago we were making books and magazines from home. We’ve gotten through this period and done some amazing things, but it’s so simple that when you’re not in the same room, nuance gets lost, decisions become slow and conflicting. That’s why we’ve always wanted to have our team together, in our offices and offices, whenever the rules allow. But as Omicron fades in Europe, we hope, and as people speak about life after the pandemic with growing confidence, will companies that have caught on with working from home be able to bring their teams back together? And do they want? This week I spoke to someone from a luxury brand who said that while most people would like to go back to their department, they can’t motivate their boss to do so. Another person told me that it was hard to imagine ever feeling old again because their company had sold half of their office space and told employees that going forward they “needed to have a good reason for coming into the office.” have to” before they rock out.

And I promise this is the last. I suppose you know that the UK Prime Minister is rightly in hot water for allowing parties to be held at 10 Downing Street at the height of lockdown. It’s shameful and another example of Boris Johnson waving his privilege in the face, but some of the BBC and Channel 4 news presenters sounded like they were auditioning for a job on Saudi television. ‘Have you ever been to a work event where alcohol was served?’ they ask the ministers morosely. “As far as I know, a trestle table was involved,” says one. “Do you think it was acceptable to eat Pringles when other people in the country only had regular chips?” (That was, I thought would be the next question.) The stupidity of our rule-setters is unnerving, but hypocritical news anchors are also irritating . And in all frankness I have to admit that during a work meeting this week I also had a glass of wine and, sorry, cheese sticks. But there was no trestle table involved. That would have been bad and very un-Monocle.

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European Capital of Culture: Remix in Esch 2022 | Culture | Art, music and lifestyle reporting from Germany | DW https://maoriart.net/european-capital-of-culture-remix-in-esch-2022-culture-art-music-and-lifestyle-reporting-from-germany-dw/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 09:30:27 +0000 https://maoriart.net/european-capital-of-culture-remix-in-esch-2022-culture-art-music-and-lifestyle-reporting-from-germany-dw/ “Let’s move our region!” is one of 160 projects that were launched in Esch-sur-Alzette and 17 other municipalities in Luxembourg and neighboring France for one-year status as Capital of Culture. The Move Challenge: People are invited to send their best dance moves to the makers of “Esch2022” via Instagram or TikTok. The snippets are put […]]]>

“Let’s move our region!” is one of 160 projects that were launched in Esch-sur-Alzette and 17 other municipalities in Luxembourg and neighboring France for one-year status as Capital of Culture. The Move Challenge: People are invited to send their best dance moves to the makers of “Esch2022” via Instagram or TikTok. The snippets are put together in a video for the “Remix Festival”.

The Harmonie de Soleuvre orchestra is part of the celebration

“A new mix, a remix” is the motto for the entire Capital of Culture program, says Esch2022 managing director Nancy Braun. “According to the motto ‘remix culture’, the familiar is linked with the unknown, high culture with everyday culture,” Braun told DW. “Citizens are invited to take part in the mission as project partners, but also on a voluntary basis, with the core message“ Participate, actively shape the future of the region and have fun ”.

Mix and re-mix

Re-mix nature. Remix art. Shuffle Europe again. Remix yourself – these are the four big projects in the fields of theater, dance, music and performance.

It’s about the future of the region, which should not only be sustainable for the Capital of Culture year, from digital art in the newly renovated former industrial milling plant to down-to-earth beer culture and brass music by the Harmonie de Soleuvre orchestra. The European Capital of Culture year is not an art biennale, but also not a large trade fair, says Braun, but a comprehensive program with “something for everyone”.

Nancy Braun, General Manager of Esch2022, Esch sur Alzette.

There is “something for everyone”, says Nancy Braun, General Director of Esch2022

After all, people from 122 nations live in Esch an der Alzette and the southern border region of the country. The former coal and steel district had to reinvent itself – also a kind of constant remix – and wanted to keep a distance from the Luxembourg capital. But Esch was never provincial, said Nancy Braun. “Esch is more down-to-earth and less chic, but also more progressive and experimental.”

A mix of languages ​​and cultures

Esch an der Alzette is proud of the “mixture”. Many migrants moved to the Grand Duchy from Portugal and Italy, and thousands of French, Belgians and Germans commute to work in Luxembourg every day, which makes the city multilingual. Languages ​​spoken are Luxembourgish, German, French, Portuguese and Italian. The cultural exchange is reflected in the theater project “Idiomatic” – five actors try to converse in five languages. It’s serious, funny and sometimes absurd, a wild mix.

A tongue stuck through a hole in the wall.

“Idiomatic” celebrates multilingualism

The city is also planning a lively exchange with the other two cultural capitals in 2022, Kaunas in Lithuania and Novi Sad in Serbia. About a third of the projects in Esch have connections with Kaunas and Novi Sad. What all three cities have in common is that they are the second largest in their respective countries and that they want to step out of the shadows of their capitals with culture.

“People want out”

Braun and her team spent four years preparing the remix in Esch. You have learned to organize projects, performances and happenings while taking the corona restrictions into account, says Braun. “Fortunately, we have come to a point where we no longer have to do everything digitally,” she says. People really want to get out, participate and experience for themselves.

To be on the safe side, the big Remix Opening Festival is not planned for the beginning of January, but for February 26th. The organizers hope that the Coronavirus-Omicron variant in Luxembourg could show a downward trend by then – and the weather will be a little warmer.

This story was originally written in German.

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On the occasion of the French EU Council Presidency, the art installation “Fabric of Europe” will be unveiled in Brussels https://maoriart.net/on-the-occasion-of-the-french-eu-council-presidency-the-art-installation-fabric-of-europe-will-be-unveiled-in-brussels/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 13:42:11 +0000 https://maoriart.net/on-the-occasion-of-the-french-eu-council-presidency-the-art-installation-fabric-of-europe-will-be-unveiled-in-brussels/ During each presidency of the Council of the European Union, the Justus Lipsius building is decorated on the basis of an artistic design concept developed by the member state holding the rotating presidency. The French culture minister Roselyne Bachelot-Narquin and the state minister for European affairs Clément Beaune inaugurated the installation “The Fabric of Europe”, […]]]>

During each presidency of the Council of the European Union, the Justus Lipsius building is decorated on the basis of an artistic design concept developed by the member state holding the rotating presidency.

The French culture minister Roselyne Bachelot-Narquin and the state minister for European affairs Clément Beaune inaugurated the installation “The Fabric of Europe”, which will adorn the Justus Lipsius building during the French presidency.

The work of art is composed of the 37 colors of the 27 flags of the member states within the EU and was created in cooperation between the architecture office Ateliers Adeline Rispal and the graphics agency Si / Studio Irresistible.

“United in diversity”

The textile installation consists of two large “wings” – each wing consists of ten large strips of fabric that can be up to 4 meters high.

It provides a visual representation of the connections within the European Union and with the rest of the world and embodies the EU motto “United in Diversity”.

The work of art “celebrates the strength and creativity of Europe and the Europeans who make it up and who weave its web every day,” remarked Culture Minister Roselyne Bachelot-Narquin.

The installation “The Fabric of Europe” will be visible throughout the French presidency – until the end of June.

Check out the video above to see the spectacular installation

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A white reggaeton artist was named Afro-Latino Artist of the Year and that’s a problem https://maoriart.net/a-white-reggaeton-artist-was-named-afro-latino-artist-of-the-year-and-thats-a-problem/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 14:00:50 +0000 https://maoriart.net/a-white-reggaeton-artist-was-named-afro-latino-artist-of-the-year-and-thats-a-problem/ The decision to choose reggaeton artist J Balvin as Afro-Latino Artist of the Year last month is a notoriously puzzling and frustrating story. The genre of music – created by Afro-Panamans and originally known as “Reggae en Español” – is a popular and profitable style of music that originated in Black Latin and Caribbean communities. […]]]>

The decision to choose reggaeton artist J Balvin as Afro-Latino Artist of the Year last month is a notoriously puzzling and frustrating story. The genre of music – created by Afro-Panamans and originally known as “Reggae en Español” – is a popular and profitable style of music that originated in Black Latin and Caribbean communities.

As was previously the case with jazz, rock and hip-hop, reggaeton has morphed from its association with black artists who struggled to break into the mainstream music industry to white artists who rake in millions and the face of reggaeton became. J Balvin, a white Colombian singer / rapper, who explicitly stated that he’s not an Afro-Latino is just the latest in a long story of black creators being struck from their art.

“The Latin American music industry borrows heavily from Afro-Latino cultural practices, but privileges and prioritizes white Latino artists to perform, and that’s a historical pattern we’ve had,” said Petra Rivera-Rideau, author of Remixing Reggaeton: The Cultural Politics of Race in Puerto Rico. ” tells Rolling Stone.

To discuss the bigger issues of representation, extinction, and black identity in Latin America, I joined in Zahira Kelly-Cabrera and Kim Haas. Kelly-Cabrera, also known as @Bad_Dominicana, is a writer, artist, and sociocultural critic whose analysis comes from a Black Latina feminist perspective. Haas, who is African American, is the executive producer and host of “Afro-Latino Travel with Kim Haas” celebrating the people of African descent in Latin America. (These interviews have been edited for length and clarity.)

Q: In December, Colombian singer and rapper J Balvin became of. named Afro-Latino artist of the year African entertainment awards USA, an organization that describes itself as support, celebration and uplifting African entertainment. The backlash to the news that award was quick because he is white Colombian and not Afro-Latino. I hear and see often that race is discussed because all Latin people are a mixture of Europeans, Blacks and Indigenous peoples, negating any need for a more concrete definition of race. Can you say something about how race is generally understood and defined in Latin America?

Kelly Cabrera: When we think of Latin America, every time I say that I’m a black Latin American, I tell people to rethink their idea of ​​the universe. Mainly because the current conception does not include the existence of me and nearly 100 million black people in Latin America. The idea is that Latin Americans are a mix of mostly whites and indigenous people, and every now and then scream a kind of black. When you think of Latinos, you think of J. Lo or Selena, you don’t think of Gina Torres or a dark skinned black woman who would look more like Viola Davis. It’s just about an image that even Latin Americans would like to cultivate, and the deletion is very deliberate, very targeted. It’s easy to categorize J Balvin and say that he’s probably mixed up somewhere in his line, and that’s good enough. Instead of saying that if we are looking for the bridge between Latin America and Africa, we should look for the descendants of Africans who are still in Latin America.

Q: Does the understanding that people can be black as well as Latinos seem to be rather inconsistent, just as we understand that there are blacks who are culturally American or British?

Kelly Cabrera: Absolutely, because of the way “Latino” is constructed to be essentially mestizo or white; essentially not black. It’s very hard for people to come to terms with the fact that you can be both black and Latino. All the Latinidad you know and love comes from black people. People have a hard time understanding that there are people of different races in Latin America, just like in the United States. However, when you think of Latin America, you never think of black people. When you think of a country like Colombia, don’t think it’s 15 to 20 percent black. That means there are a lot of black people; they may be concentrated in places, but that is still a lot of people. They have the second largest (black) population after Brazil, which has the second largest (black) population after Nigeria.

It is very difficult for both Latin Americans and people outside Latin America to understand blackness as a Latin American. Every time I arrive at Miami Airport, people refuse to speak to me in Spanish even though my name is Zahira Kelly-Cabrera and I am obviously from the Dominican Republic. I get, “Oh my mistake, I thought you were Jamaican or something else.” I’m black, so not a Latin American. In the DR, I’m automatically Latin American. In places like Cali, Colombia, everyone immediately spoke to me in Spanish. It’s an assumption and they assumed I was from the black churches.

Haas: Absolutely, because when I speak to Afro-Latinos they have often said, “I am both. I’m of African descent and Latin American. ”When I speak to a lot of Afro-Latinos, they will often tell me that they feel like they are in a kind of no man’s land where people say,“ Well, you are not black ”or“ You are no Latino ”. and they say, “No, we can both be, and we are both.” This notion of what it means to be Latino includes blacks because people of African descent make up a significant part of Latin America. When we think of a Latin American, I think we have to think about what that means.

Q: After this situation with J Balvin and his award, what would you hope for from the resulting understanding of Afro-Latin identity and representation?

Kelly Cabrera: I would hope people start thinking about where all this music that they love, benefit from and enjoy so much that they understand where it is coming from. That they understand where it comes from and who has been marginalized, not just in music, but in every way. We have the least access to resources, that really is the bottom line. We’re creating this in the midst of so much … struggle. In Colombia, where J Balvin is from, Colombian activists who fight for their people and fight against displacement are murdered almost every week. That has a context.


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Christie’s features the collection of Pierre Durand, co-founder of The Chinese Porcelain Company https://maoriart.net/christies-features-the-collection-of-pierre-durand-co-founder-of-the-chinese-porcelain-company/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 22:50:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/christies-features-the-collection-of-pierre-durand-co-founder-of-the-chinese-porcelain-company/ George II gilded wooden overcoat mirror insert with Chinese export mirror images, around 1760 Courtesy Christie’s Text size The collection of the late Pierre Durand, a collector and philanthropist who co-founded the Chinese Porcelain Company, will be up for auction at Christie’s in New York on January 27th. The collection includes 243 lots of Chinese […]]]>

George II gilded wooden overcoat mirror insert with Chinese export mirror images, around 1760

Courtesy Christie’s

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The most exciting exhibitions worldwide in 2022 https://maoriart.net/the-most-exciting-exhibitions-worldwide-in-2022/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 02:11:14 +0000 https://maoriart.net/the-most-exciting-exhibitions-worldwide-in-2022/ Written by The art newspaper This article was originally published by The art newspaper, an editorial partner of CNN Style. You can read their full articles on Year Ahead 2022 here. This year’s must-see exhibitions include the return of the Venice Biennale and Documenta, blockbuster shows by Donatello and Cézanne, and a sculpture festival for […]]]>

Written by The art newspaper

This article was originally published by The art newspaper, an editorial partner of CNN Style. You can read their full articles on Year Ahead 2022 here.

This year’s must-see exhibitions include the return of the Venice Biennale and Documenta, blockbuster shows by Donatello and Cézanne, and a sculpture festival for the World Cup in Qatar. Due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, please check whether there are exhibitions before your trip.

“Yves Saint Laurent aux Musées”

Where: Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris, Center Pompidou, Musée d’Orsay, Musée National Picasso Paris, Musée Yves Saint Laurent Paris, Musée du Louvre

When: January 29th – May 15th (closes April 15th at the Musée Picasso)

Six decades ago, the first fashion show under the name Yves Saint Laurent (YSL) ran down the catwalk. To celebrate this milestone, six museums in Paris where the French designer sought inspiration have collaborated on a city-wide exhibition. Each will combine YSL creations with works by artists such as Mondrian, Picasso, Matisse, Bonnard and Dufy. In the Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris there will be three spectacular silk dresses next to Dufy’s “La Fée Electricité” (“The Electricity Fairy”, 1937), while the Musée d’Orsay will focus on his fascination with Marcel. Proust, who is believed to have inspired Saint Laurent’s Le Smoking, focuses on the first tuxedo for women. Meanwhile, the Musée National Picasso will explain how influential the Spanish master was on Saint Laurent, from the fashion designer’s homage to Picasso’s “Ballets Russes” sets and costumes (1976) to his 1988 Cubist collection.Sarah Belmont

“The World of Stonehenge”

Where: British Museum, London

When: February 17th – July 17th

This Bronze Age sun pendant from 1000-800 BC Will be part of the British Museum’s great Stonehenge exhibition. Credit: © The Trustees of the British Museum

Stonehenge was built more than four millennia ago and is one of the most famous and at the same time most mysterious monuments in the world. Who were the people who built it and inhabited prehistoric Britain? “The World of Stonehenge” will show that, with trade links established with mainland Europe, they were more developed than generally assumed. One of the undisputed highlights of the show will be the 3,600-year-old Nebra Sky Disc, the oldest existing representation of the cosmos, which is discovered in today’s Germany and is being exhibited for the first time in Great Britain. -José da Silva

“Faith Ringgold: American People”

Where: New Museum, New York

When: February 17th – June 5th

Ringgold created United States of "Attica" (1972) in honor of the men who perished in the Attica prison demonstration.

Ringgold founded the United States from “Attica” (1972) to honor the men who died in the Attica prison demonstration. Credit: © Faith Ringgold / ARS, NY and DACS, London / Courtesy of ACA Galleries, New York

This is the first retrospective of the pioneering American artist Faith Ringgold in her hometown of New York. The exhibition spans six decades of the 91-year-old artist’s productive career, from works created in response to the civil rights era to autobiographical pieces telling stories of the Harlem Renaissance. -Gabriella Angeleti

“Donatello: the Renaissance”

Where: Palazzo Strozzi and Museo del Bargello, Florence; Gemäldegalerie, Berlin

When: March 19 – July 31 (Florence); September 2 – January 8, 2023 (Berlin)

Donatello's marble bas-relief "Madonna and Child (1420-25)."

Donatello’s marble bas-relief “Madonna and Child (1420-25).” Credit: © Antje Voigt / SMB sculpture collection

The 15th century Florentine sculptor Donatello was considered a “master of masters” in his time. Nevertheless, there has not been a major exhibition devoted to the work of the sculptor for almost 40 years. That is set to change in March, when a comprehensive overview of Donatello’s work is opened in Florence in the Palazzo Strozzi and in the nearby Museo Nazionale del Bargello, which houses the most important collection of the sculptor’s works, including “David” (around 1440). Smaller incarnations of the show will be on view in September in the Gemäldegalerie in Berlin and next year in the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. -Cristina Ruiz

“150 Years of Mondrian”

Where: Art Museum The Hague, The Hague, Netherlands; Fondation Beyeler, Riehen, Switzerland; K20, Düsseldorf

When: April 2 – September 25 (The Hague); June 5th to October 9th (Riehen); October 29 – February 10, 2023 (Düsseldorf)

Piet Mondrian, "Diamond composition with eight lines and red (picture no.III)," 1938.

Piet Mondrian, “Rhombus Composition with Eight Lines and Red (Image No. III),” 1938. Credit: © Mondrian / Holtzman Trust c / o HCR International Warrenton, VA USA

With only three primary colors (plus black and white) and two ordinal directions, Piet Mondrian took painting to a new level of abstraction. His influence on modernism was immense – in the visual arts as well as in design, architecture and fashion. On the occasion of the 150th anniversary of his birth in Amersfoot, the Netherlands, several museums are presenting large overviews of his work. An exhibition at the Swiss Fondation Beyeler and the K20 in Düsseldorf begins with his early paintings, which were influenced by Dutch landscape painting and post-impressionism. It will then follow its development as it completely left the portrayal and ends in its right-angled miracles. -Lee Cheshire

Venice Biennale

Where: Venice

When: April 23-27 November

The Venice Biennale returns this spring.

The Venice Biennale returns this spring. Credit: Andrea Avezzù / La Biennale di Venezia

A global pandemic, the catastrophic effects of climate change and developments in artificial intelligence are just some of the great threats to the future of humanity that artists are grappling with for this year’s main exhibition at the 59th Venice Biennale. “Despite the climate that has forged (the exhibition), it strives to be an optimistic exhibition,” its curator Cecilia Alemani said in a statement. You can find all the news about the country pavilions at Venice Biennale 2022: All national pavilions, artists and curators. -José da Silva

World Cup Sculpture Festival

Where: Qatar

When: During the whole year

Tom Classens "Falcon," 2021.

Tom Classen’s “Falcon,” 2021. Credit: Courtesy of the Museums of Qatar

Football fans flying to Doha for this year’s controversial World Cup (beginning November 21) will be greeted by this monumental gold sculpture of Qatar’s national bird, the falcon. It was created by the Dutch artist Tom Claassen and is one of more than 40 new public works that will be created in the small peninsular state. The “Outdoor Museum” program is overseen by Sheikha Al Mayassa bint Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, the sister of the ruling Emir and the high-spending director of the Qatar Museum. Other works include pieces by Bruce Nauman, Isa Genzken, Subodh Gupta, Mark Handforth and Katharina Fritsch. -Lee Cheshire

“Cezanne”

Where: Art Institute of Chicago; Tate Modern, London

When: May 15 – September 5 (Chicago); October 6 – March 12, 2023 (London)

"Still life with apples" (1893-94) will be one of 90 oil paintings by Cézanne shown in Chicago.

“Still Life with Apples” (1893-94) is one of 90 oil paintings by Cézanne that can be seen in Chicago. Credit: Courtesy of the J Paul Getty Museum

The Art Institute of Chicago and London’s Tate Modern are organizing the largest Paul Cézanne exhibition in a generation. Simply called “Cézanne”, it will span the artist’s entire career. In Chicago, where the exhibition opens, it comprises 90 oil paintings, 40 works on paper and two sketchbooks, in London it is slightly reduced (70 oils and 18 on paper). Cézanne (1839-1906) has always been considered an “artist artist” and exerted a great influence on later painters, including Monet, Pissarro, Matisse and Picasso. He remains an inspiration, and among the exhibition lenders, Jasper Johns, the American abstract expressionist, will send three major watercolors (plus an oil painting of a nude to Chicago only) from his personal collection. The technical analysis of the artist’s color palette, composition construction, and punctuation will deepen our understanding of how Cézanne created his paintings. Chicago promises that the show will “reshape Cézanne, a giant in art history, for our time”. –Martin Bailey

Documenta Fifteen

Where: Kassel, Germany

When: June 18 – September 25

Indonesian <a class=artist collective Ruangrupa with members of the Documenta team.”/>

Indonesian artist collective Ruangrupa with members of the Documenta team. Credit: Nicolas Wefers

Organizing the world’s largest and most influential exhibition of contemporary art amid a pandemic was a challenge, but after some doubts as to whether it could take place as planned, the Documenta Fifteen is due to take place in Kassel this summer. It is curated by the Indonesian artist collective Ruangrupa and promises to be a reflection of our times as well as previous editions of this extensive show, which takes place every five years. The artists invited are mostly from the global south, and many are activist collectives rather than individuals. These include The Nest Collective of Kenya, La Intermundial Holobiente of Argentina, Keleketla! Library of South Africa and Sa Sa Art Projects of Cambodia. Venues include a former department store and former wine depot, as well as more traditional locations like the city’s Fridericianum Museum. -Catherine Hickley

“The space in between: Modernism in Korean art”

Where: Los Angeles County Museum of Art

When: September 11 – February 19, 2023

The paintings "family" was founded by Pai Unsung between 1930 and 1935 when Korea was under Japanese rule.

The painting “Family” was created by Pai Unsung between 1930 and 1935, when Korea was under Japanese rule. Credit: Courtesy of Daejeon City

Last year interest in South Korean film and television skyrocketed, and Western art galleries are opening in Seoul. But the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) has been researching Korean art for several years with a number of large exhibitions. “The Space Between” covers the critical but often overlooked period from 1897 to 1964, from the end of the Joseon period, the last Korean dynasty, to the colonial period (1910-45) when Korea was under Japanese rule, and the Korean War ( 1950-53), which brought with it strong American cultural influences, particularly Abstract Expressionism in the visual arts. Recent artists have also been influenced by the European Art Informel movement. The exhibition concludes with a look at modernism and the beginnings of contemporary art, including artists such as Youn Myeong-Ro, Lee Sangbeom and Park Rehyun. It is a great story told through the work of 90 artists and 140 paintings, photographs and sculptures. – Scarlet Cheng

Read more stories from The Art Newspaper here.


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Promateris will be the European market leader in the production of biomaterials in 2022 https://maoriart.net/promateris-will-be-the-european-market-leader-in-the-production-of-biomaterials-in-2022/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 02:01:38 +0000 https://maoriart.net/promateris-will-be-the-european-market-leader-in-the-production-of-biomaterials-in-2022/ Promateris, a Romanian industrial group and market leader in the CEE region in the production of biodegradable and compostable packaging, announces that the demand for biodegradable and compostable packaging, which the company produces at the Buftea plant, increased by 110% in 2021 compared to the previous year. This growing demand has contributed to the company’s […]]]>

Promateris, a Romanian industrial group and market leader in the CEE region in the production of biodegradable and compostable packaging, announces that the demand for biodegradable and compostable packaging, which the company produces at the Buftea plant, increased by 110% in 2021 compared to the previous year. This growing demand has contributed to the company’s results in 2021. Promateris recorded a 66% increase in sales in the first nine months of the year compared to the same period in the previous year. The group recorded a consolidated turnover (including the sales company Biodeck) of 27.5 million euros and a consolidated EBITDA of over 4 million euros, an increase of 112% compared to the same period of the previous year.

“Awareness of the risks of climate change and, in particular, pollution from single-use plastic has led to the adoption of legislative solutions at EU and Romanian levels, which has led to increased public interest in bio-based and compostable packaging. We believe in the green transformation that is taking place in the European Union and our goal is to become the largest European manufacturer of low carbon packaging. In the last three years we have invested over 10 million euros in the development of biodegradable and compostable packaging and the recycling of bioplastics. Promateris is on an accelerated growth trend and we will continue to invest in the development of the company to improve performance, both by increasing production capacity and by digitizing our work processes, ”said Tudor Georgescu, CEO of Promateris.

In 2021, the group recorded an increase in production in the field of biodegradable and compostable packaging by 36% compared to 2020. The company plans to increase production in this segment by 40% by 2022 and thus its position as the regional market leader in medium – and to consolidate Eastern Europe. With a view to reducing its carbon footprint, Promateris recycled more than 1,000 tons of industrial waste from production in 2021. This was made possible by the company’s installed biomaterial recycling line.

Promateris closes 2021 with a number of significant achievements, such as the receipt of non-repayable financing of 744,000 euros for the production of raw materials based on corn starch. The grant is offered by Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway through the SEE and Norwegian Funding Mechanisms 2014-2021 as part of the SME Growth in Romania program. In addition, the company received a grant of 100,000 euros for the installation of photovoltaic modules as part of the Electric UP program. This is the company’s first step in moving to renewable energy in the production process.

In addition, Promateris published its first ESG (Environmental, Social, Governance) report in 2021 and received / renews the following certifications: ISO 9001, 14001, 45001, 22000 attesting to the best practices of the organization. In cooperation with the German company Theurer, the company has implemented a state-of-the-art ERP system that specializes in packaging production with a view to making workflows more efficient.

In 2022, Promateris plans to continue investing in biomaterials in order to consolidate its position as a leading company in the CEE region by expanding its production capacities for bio-based and compostable packaging. In addition, the company wants to expand the production of flexible packaging for the food industry and start producing biodegradable and compostable raw materials based on corn starch. This makes Promateris the first company in Eastern Europe to manufacture raw materials based on corn starch.

In addition, Promateris is aiming to enter a new market segment – paper packaging – by developing a production line, a project that will be completed in 2023.

About Promateris

Promateris is a company listed on the main market of the Bucharest Stock Exchange. Promateris specializes in state-of-the-art packaging made from renewable, biodegradable and compostable materials. In the Buftea factory, the company produces sustainable alternatives to single-use plastic, such as a wide range of bags for retail (T-shirt bags, fruit and vegetable bags, organic waste bags). Promateris operates three business areas: bio-based and compostable packaging, which produces packaging from renewable raw materials, bio-plastic recycling, through which residual waste can be recycled and fed back into the production process; Electrical cable compounds that are used to develop and manufacture granules for the manufacture of electrical cables.


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Sunday, January 2, 2022 – The Monocle Minute https://maoriart.net/sunday-january-2-2022-the-monocle-minute/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 06:10:20 +0000 https://maoriart.net/sunday-january-2-2022-the-monocle-minute/ THE FASTER TRACK / TYLER BRÛLÉ In with the new one Happy New Year, Bonne Annee, well anno, Godt nytår, Happy New Year and feliz ano novo! This branch of the Monocle family welcomed 2022 in a reserved, well-lit and tasty catering format high above the rest of Europe in cozy St. Moritz. There were […]]]>

THE FASTER TRACK / TYLER BRÛLÉ

In with the new one

Happy New Year, Bonne Annee, well anno, Godt nytår, Happy New Year and feliz ano novo! This branch of the Monocle family welcomed 2022 in a reserved, well-lit and tasty catering format high above the rest of Europe in cozy St. Moritz. There were friends from London and Essen, Zurich and Lugano, and while there was a lot of reflection on the past year (topics generally focused on incomprehensible governmental coronavirus measures, poorly behaved children and the state of the very disabled workplace) there was also one To look ahead healthy and to go further into the world, despite repeated cancellations of major events, including the furniture and design fairs in Paris, Cologne and Stockholm. The last guests put on their coats shortly after 2.30 a.m. and despite one or two rockets around the lake, I believe that I passed out around 02.39 a.m. and woke up on the brightest sunny day. While other household members looked after the Christmas tree, packed away the Christmas tree balls and prepared for the return to the flatlands, I was able to take a few hours to think about 2022 and write down a few wishes for the coming months.

1. Quick start
The first week of the New Year is always a bit chunky with many taking an extra week off, some schools don’t return until mid-month, and much of the southern hemisphere is in the middle of the summer vacation. I wanted to cautiously lean on the matter, but decided to get started right away and will be the first to report to work on Monday morning. I want to move so much that I feel more efficient in the office and in the middle of it than working remotely. By the time you read this, the marching orders for 2022 have been sent to the key forces, the diary is filled by the end of the first quarter and I am already driving through the mountains in a well-equipped dining car.

2. Things you can’t do at home
Many will likely read this in a country that has some kind of home office recommendation and / or an office ban. What a nonsense. A key wish is that governments allow companies to set their own rules, decide what makes sense for their particular business, and act accordingly. The same applies to the rapidly expanding concept of quarantine. Does that really make sense now? Let’s come back to the middle to allow more personal responsibility and less nanny. Plus, as it was introduced on New Years Eve, there are so many things you can’t do from home. A favorite pastime in the Zurich office on quiet Tuesdays is playing “Catch the Grape” (any bite-sized fruit will do). I think you understand how this game works. Fun for a few minutes, a slight relief for those who have bowed their heads and one of the many things that bring a team together rather than being isolated with kids, cats, and partners who have too many opinions about what they are heard on a call.

3. A bigger media diet
A few months ago I recommended that you do something for your mental health, especially in English-speaking countries, by reading daily newspapers (and related opinions) from other markets – Portugal, Denmark, Switzerland, Belgium. Getting new opinions and viewpoints from other parts of the world can be invaluable in helping you get your day off to a better start, not to mention introducing all kinds of smart opportunities. And yes, Google Translate works wonders – even on lengthy, complicated reads. You’ll be happy to know that not all countries or media take crazy, left-wing denial / don’t-say-debate-suffocation for granted. I hope more people can add an extra day or two to their morning media breakfast buffet.

4. Pssst!
Silent wagons operate on many railway lines in Switzerland, in which the code of “no chatter / don’t dare look” is strictly enforced – even more than the wearing of masks. Can more companies please adopt this concept? Since many of us feel like we are losing the battle to all of those who treat the world as one great living room where it is acceptable to watch and listen to family videos, HBO series, and porn in public, it is not that Time for clever business owners to define spaces of serenity and tranquility? Isn’t it time to give back power to managers and let them enforce clear house rules?

5. Time for a sensitivity summit?
Davos could be canceled again, but could someone please call a quick conference to get businesses and governments back on track for sensible decisions. Fast fast! I am happy to host a meeting of executives who need challenging ideas and concepts that emerge from an increasingly narrowing channel of narratives and so-called solutions. Should we strive for something in the next three weeks? I’m all ears tb @ monocle.


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