Art Style – Maori Art http://maoriart.net/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 09:00:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://maoriart.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Art Style – Maori Art http://maoriart.net/ 32 32 Ridgewood, NJ: A historic suburb with city views https://maoriart.net/ridgewood-nj-a-historic-suburb-with-city-views/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 09:00:49 +0000 https://maoriart.net/ridgewood-nj-a-historic-suburb-with-city-views/ When Corey Kaylor learned his medical brokerage firm was relocating him to New Jersey two years ago, his wife, Michelle, was excited to return to the Northeast, where she grew up. But after years of roaming the country—most recently six years in Arizona—neither she nor anyone else in the family knew much about life in […]]]>

When Corey Kaylor learned his medical brokerage firm was relocating him to New Jersey two years ago, his wife, Michelle, was excited to return to the Northeast, where she grew up. But after years of roaming the country—most recently six years in Arizona—neither she nor anyone else in the family knew much about life in the New York metro area.

During a fact-finding mission in September 2020, while driving through Bergen County, North Jersey, they encountered Ridgewood, which reminded Mr. Kaylor of the fictional town portrayed in the television series The Gilmore Girls.

“We didn’t know anything about the area, but we fell in love with Ridgewood,” said Ms. Kaylor, 45, a real estate home stager. “It felt like Stars Hollow, with all the outdoor dining and a guy playing guitar in the village square. My husband said, ‘Hey, they even have a town troubadour here.’”

But finding a home in Ridgewood at the height of the pandemic-driven suburban migration wasn’t easy. The Kaylors lost five bidding wars before finally buying a 100-year-old, five-bedroom, three-and-a-half-bathroom Tudor-style home last June for $1.28 million.

The Kaylors’ discovery of Ridgewood comes as no surprise to Christine Gubb, a real estate agent at Keller Williams who has lived in the Bergen County village for 50 years. “Everybody’s talking about Ridgewood,” said Ms. Gubb, 65. “When someone moves to this area and they’re like, ‘Where do you want me to move?’ they are told, ‘Go to Ridgewood.’”

For more than a century, the village has attracted professionals drawn by the highly rated schools, the business district with its restaurants and upscale shops, and the large houses.

With two young children and a third on the way, last winter Allyse and Raymond Bader decided it was time to leave their two-bedroom apartment on Manhattan’s Upper West Side and explore opportunities in Connecticut, Westchester County and North to explore Jersey. Ridgewood seemed a good fit, evoking what Ms. Bader, 37, called “the feel of the Upper West Side with the architecture, old and new, that was interesting and beautiful.” In May, the couple closed a five-bedroom Tudor-style home built in 1930 and completely renovated in 2014, paying $1.9 million — about $200,000 over the asking price.

Her June move-in date was pushed back when Ms. Bader, who works in curriculum development at Columbia University’s Teachers College, went into labor two weeks early. Now, a mother of three, she’s anticipating moving to “a beautiful, walkable city and a really strong community,” she said. “I can’t wait to settle down.”

Esther and Josh Louis are another couple who made their way to Ridgewood from the Upper West Side. For the past year, the couple and their 7-year-old son, Henry, have been living at Mr. Louis’ childhood home and sleeping in his bedroom. In July, they will move into the four-bedroom Colonial Center Hall, which they purchased for $1.457 million.

“It’s been an emotional rollercoaster ride,” said Ms. Louis, 48, a senior manager at the Royal Bank of Canada. “We look forward to finally getting off this ride.”

Ridgewood has six neighborhoods named for nearby elementary schools: three on the east side of the railroad tracks bisecting the village, and three on the west side.

The Heights, a neighborhood in the Ridge District on the west side, has streets high enough to offer a view of the New York City skyline, and houses some of the most expensive in the village. But many of Ridgewood’s roughly 26,000 residents prefer to live on the East Side, within walking distance of the high school and downtown.

Much of the housing was built in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, after the rail lines from New York were extended west and Ridgewood became a summer vacation spot for city dwellers. The facades of these older Victorian and Colonial homes are mostly intact, although many of the interiors have been drastically altered.

“Buyers love the exterior charm of the historic homes, but they want the interior to be completely modernized,” said Christina Gibbons, a realtor with Christie’s International Real Estate and a resident of the village for 16 years. “If it’s already renovated, it’s a home game; If they have to do it themselves, they could take a break.”

While families with children are drawn to the schools, Ridgewood also appeals to those seeking a metropolitan setting. After realizing she could do most of her club management work remotely, Susanne Warfield left New York City 16 years ago in search of a quieter place with a zest for life. She paid $687,000 for a four-bedroom Dutch Colonial home in Ridgewood that she shares with her 75-pound German pointer, Harry.

“I’m a single working woman and I didn’t want to be in a place with only houses,” said Ms. Warfield, 60. “I like that there are so many restaurants. And every morning a lot of people walk by. I don’t have kids in the school system, which accounts for most of our taxes, but that’s the cost of doing business and living in a place like this.”

In late June, the New Jersey Multiple Listing Service listed 35 homes for sale in Ridgewood with an average listing price of $1.15 million. The most expensive was a five-bedroom Mediterranean-style home built on 0.8 acres in the early 1900s and listed for $2.85 million; The cheapest was a four-bedroom colonial building built in the 1950s, which was listed for $545,000.

The median price of the 136 homes sold as of June 22 of this year was $961,500; During the same period in 2021, 143 homes were sold for a median of $810,000.

Rents are tight. While four new complexes have sprung up in recent years, most apartment buildings have waiting lists. Recently available apartments have included a one bedroom in the older Mayflower Apartments for $1,890 per month and a two bedroom, two and a half bath unit in the Dayton, a newer building near the village center, for $5,730.

Downtown Ridgewood has more than 100 restaurants and as many shops in the streets surrounding downtown’s Van Neste Square Memorial Park. The village is also a cultural hub: Bookends bookshop is a stop on many author book signings, and the Ridgewood Guild International Film Festival is held annually at the 1932 art deco Warner Theatre, now a Bow Tie Cinema.

A popular hangout is Graydon Pool, a natural swimming hole in the center of the village that offers swimming programs, tennis and pickleball courts, and playgrounds, with seasonal memberships for $130 (or $30 for seniors). Part of the 577-acre Saddle River County Park — including a wild duck pond and dog park — is also in Ridgewood.

Ridgewood’s six elementary schools — Hawes, Orchard, Ridge, Somerville, Travell, and Willard — define the neighborhoods and, to some extent, residents’ experience of living in the village, as families tend to pledge allegiance to their local schools.

Preschoolers attend Glen School, while sixth through eighth graders attend Benjamin Franklin or George Washington Middle School.

Serving approximately 1,700 students, Ridgewood High School is consistently ranked among the top public high schools in the state, with 94 percent of students attending college. The high school offers 69 honors classes and 30 advanced placement courses. The average SAT scores in 2020-21 were 635 in literacy and 651 in math, compared to the state averages of 557 and 560.

Private school options in the area include the Academy of Our Lady, a Glen Rock Catholic school serving students from preschool through eighth grade, and Immaculate Heart Academy, an all-girls Catholic high school in Washington Township.

New Jersey Transit offers train and bus service between Ridgewood and New York City.

Trains to Penn Station in Manhattan take about an hour, changing at Secaucus; Tickets cost $9.75 one-way or $298 for a monthly pass. NJ Transit buses 163 and 164 make the trip from Van Neste Square to Port Authority in Manhattan in 80 to 90 minutes; The fare is $7 one-way or $199 for a monthly pass.

More a pond than a swimming pool, the spring-fed Graydon Pool was created by damming part of the Ho Ho Kus Creek in the 1920s and expanded in 1936 as part of a Works Progress Administration project. In 2009, debate erupted over a proposal to replace the 6-acre, sandy-bottomed swimming hole with a concrete-lined, chlorinated pool. But the recession put an end to those efforts, and the pool remains in its natural state today.

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Celebrate Pride Month in style https://maoriart.net/celebrate-pride-month-in-style/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 01:54:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/celebrate-pride-month-in-style/ MANILA, Philippines – Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) network Telus International Philippines (TIP), provider of digitally-enabled customer experience and business process solutions, celebrated Pride Month with a Design Your Own Pride Jacket and mini fashion show at its activity center location Vertis North recently. “At the Design Institute of the School of Fashion and the Arts […]]]>

MANILA, Philippines – Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) network Telus International Philippines (TIP), provider of digitally-enabled customer experience and business process solutions, celebrated Pride Month with a Design Your Own Pride Jacket and mini fashion show at its activity center location Vertis North recently.

“At the Design Institute of the School of Fashion and the Arts (SOFA) we enhance individual skills, share personal narratives through creative self-expression. This activity aligns with our goal and purpose of inclusive stories and initiatives,” said Associate Director Madz Constantino during the activity briefing.

Media viewers freely expressed their most authentic selves by creating art out of a denim jacket. Design materials, Pride-themed patches, lapel pins, buttons, rolls of ribbon, no-glitter beads, and custom workspaces were provided to attendees from mainstream and online media. They had 30 minutes to finalize their respective design aesthetics.

At the peak of activity, entries from Philstar.comManila Bulletin and Nylon Philippines magazine were named top 3 contributors.

“Fashion is performance art. For me, Pride Month is about expressing and celebrating your authentic self in every way you can. And I believe that fashion can be a powerful vehicle for self-expression. It enables us to make clothing that speaks and goes with a message; conveying a story at every turn,” announced SOFA Design Studio Instructor and fashion designer Fred Telarma, who chaired the judging panel along with Madz Constantino, Associate Director at SOFA, and Pia Gajasan, TIP’s Asia Pacific Communications Manager.

“Pride goes beyond the month of June. Here at TIP, everyone wants to be addressed with their chosen pronouns. Our diversity efforts have continued throughout our years in business,” said Carlos Giammatei, Director of Brand, Telus International Asia-Pacific. marketing and culture.

Since its inception in 2005, TIP has affirmed its enduring commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion through art, fashion and personal expression. Its building is lit up with the proud colors of the spectrum every night of Pride Month.

TIP has four locations around Metro Manila as well as two new locations in Iloilo supporting top local and global brands.

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Get to know Stryer’s unique bass style https://maoriart.net/get-to-know-stryers-unique-bass-style/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 01:23:14 +0000 https://maoriart.net/get-to-know-stryers-unique-bass-style/ Denver-based bass artist Stryer stopped by to chat with Robbie Rosen about his artistic journey and his latest track, Fall For Me Again. The Mile High City has become known as one of the greatest homes of bass music stryer is an artist currently rising in the ranks of the scene that calls her home. […]]]>


Denver-based bass artist Stryer stopped by to chat with Robbie Rosen about his artistic journey and his latest track, Fall For Me Again.


The Mile High City has become known as one of the greatest homes of bass music stryer is an artist currently rising in the ranks of the scene that calls her home. With releases like “Drown” With Maria Sweet and “mine” With fadedhe has since ended up on Subsidia and has developed a deeper connection with him Bear Grillz and its imprint, Rude service.

Stryer first appeared on Rude Service in 2021 and has had a number of releases on the bass-heavy label, including the propagation EP and collaborations like “Apollo” With sentient and WISNER. These have helped demonstrate the dynamic range this emerging artist brings to his productions and he has continued to impress in 2022. Kick off the year by collaborating with Bear Grillz and Meg & Dia to the “Hover‘ and after that ‘light up” With VLCN and the Full moon EPWith each release it becomes clearer that Stryer is an artist to watch.

Last month Stryer delivered “Under The tides” With SOUNDR and then double the summertime fun that ensues by “fall in love with me again” With Robbie Rosen this past Friday. Looking for additional insight into this up-and-coming bass artist, we caught up with him to talk about his recent releases, past experiences and more. Give Stryer’s exclusive guest mix a spin and read on for the conversation!

Stream EDMID Guest Mix 328 || Stryer on SoundCloud:


Hi Stryer, thank you for taking the time to chat with us today! You recently released your latest single Fall For Me Again, which features vocals by Robbie Rosen. What is the story behind how you two came together to work on this track?

First off, “Fall For Me Again” is easily one of my favorite songs to work on. Robbie is an amazing artist and such a cool guy too. I first received a bunch of topline ideas from his manager and this one caught my eye immediately. I knew that we actually had something special ahead of us.

As soon as I got the voice I went to town and put out the first demo in a few days. Well, nine months and about 25 different versions later, we now have the final masterpiece it is!

Other releases this year like that full moon EP, Come On with VLCN and Under The Tide with SOUNDR have also seen you collaborate with other artists. Have these collaborations helped you expand your own skills in the studio? Do you find yourself finding new ways to approach production?

Absolutely, I’ve learned a lot from all my collaborations up to this point. VLCN and SOUNDR in particular have become really good friends who I talk to and exchange ideas with quite often. I feel like any time you work with someone new it’s really important to study their techniques and maybe take some of that with you for your future projects.

You started the year with a bang by releasing “Float” with Bear Grillz and Meg & Dia and have clearly found a home on Rude Service. As an aspiring artist, what has the support of Bear Grillz and his team meant to you?

The support from RJ and the rest of Rude Service is always amazing. It’s still very wild to me that RJ is my manager now. Four years ago I was just a little 21-year-old raver in the crowd at his sets going crazy. It’s really amazing to have been working with him and my other manager Chris for about a year now, their knowledge is insane and I’m learning new things about the industry every day. I also consider them almost different brothers at this point and enjoy talking trash about their sports teams every day.

Let’s switch gears and dive into your backstory a little. What led to your passion for bass music and inevitably to producing and playing it yourself?

So I originally started listening to EDM at the gym because I loved the energy. Of course I started with big room/progressive house and other mainstream genres. I finally got into dubstep after attending Wobbleland San Jose with some friends in 2016. I loved how the DJs changed songs at the drop and really gave the crowd that ‘wow’ factor.

When I moved to Denver in 2018, I decided to produce and DJ myself because I wanted to make music to work out. It turns out that I discovered an absolute passion for creating, something I never planned to do when I first started. I specifically started making more emotional bass music because I absolutely live for those nostalgic moments at festivals where the whole crowd puts their hands up and sings along. Those are the moments that are remembered for a lifetime and I strive to create those for my fans.

What has been the biggest struggle you have faced as an artist in your career so far? were you able to overcome it

I would say the biggest struggles I’ve faced as an artist have been mental struggles with myself. I’m sure I’m not alone in saying that it’s very hard not to compare yourself to other artists out there. There will always be someone taller than you, that’s just the fact. I’ve helped myself kill some of those thoughts just by reminding myself why I’m doing this for the love of music.

I also think of all the people I have touched with my music so far. It really is such a crazy feeling when someone reaches out and says my music saved their life, got them through a tough time, or was just nice to hear on a long journey!

stryer
Photo credit: @blazejzalewski

What’s the biggest piece of advice you’ve received so far that has helped you take your career to the next level?

I received a lot of advice, so this question is really hard to answer. What really struck me was RJ’s (Bear Grillz) general reassurance that a music career is such a long process and that I shouldn’t expect anything to happen overnight. I’m often prone to these thoughts, “Why don’t I play X Shows or get X Streams?” but this helps to clear my mind and keep me focused.

Just for fun and since we’re in the early days of summer, what’s your favorite way to stay cool during the heat of the season?

Well honestly I spend most of my time in my studio so there’s always AC. [Laughs] That being said, an In N Out 1/2 Chocolate 1/2 Vanilla Shake always fails.

Finally, what are your goals for the rest of 2022 and beyond?

For the rest of this year and beyond, I just want to keep growing musically while making as many friends as possible. I know that if I keep doing these things and keep my intentions pure, the rest will follow.

For some “measurable” goals I’d like to get signed by a booking agency and get some releases on some big labels that we’ve been working towards for years. I’m confident we can do it all!


Follow Stryer on social media:

Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | SoundCloud | Pull out

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Your favorite artists need touring musicians. Get to know Jammcard https://maoriart.net/your-favorite-artists-need-touring-musicians-get-to-know-jammcard/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 13:32:45 +0000 https://maoriart.net/your-favorite-artists-need-touring-musicians-get-to-know-jammcard/ When an artist needed a backing band for decades in the studio or on the go, their main option was to search their contacts to find musicians to play with. Elmo Lovano wants to change that. Lovano, himself a longtime touring and session drummer who has worked with the likes of Miley Cyrus and Skrillex, […]]]>

When an artist needed a backing band for decades in the studio or on the go, their main option was to search their contacts to find musicians to play with. Elmo Lovano wants to change that.

Lovano, himself a longtime touring and session drummer who has worked with the likes of Miley Cyrus and Skrillex, launched Jammcard in 2017 and has created one of the most comprehensive databases of professional musicians to hire in the music industry. His goal: modernize how artists find musicians to play with.

“I basically wanted to do what I wanted to do when I was performing most,” says Lovano. “The only other option is to send a bulk message to 20 people and hope you find someone. Whether you’re an up-and-coming talent or collaborating with Beyoncé, the entire creative side of our industry relies on word of mouth. There is a better way to do this and I want to create the global database of the entire live music industry that is searchable and bookable to help musicians get more work.”

Most of the time, artists and their teams don’t have many options other than word of mouth to find potential musicians to play with. Artist managers often text musicians they know, ask their friends, or seek other recommendations to find band members to support their clients. Jammcard doesn’t stop the search, but ideally it at least formalizes it and allows an app to curate choices for a customer rather than aimlessly browsing.

Lovano’s startup grew in ambition and to date has secured $5 million from investors including legendary producer Quincy Jones and Twitch co-founder Kevin Lin. Today, Jammcard has 10,000 professional musicians on the platform in Los Angeles, Nashville, New York and Atlanta, the country’s four major music hubs. Lovano also teases that the platform will open to international markets soon. Jammcard is very picky as musicians must pass a vetting process to prove they are full-time, professional musicians working in the industry.

Tom Windish, a high-profile agent at Wasserman Music who represents acclaimed artists such as Lorde, Billie Eilish and The XX, is a regular Jammcard user who frequently uses the platform to find musicians for up-and-coming artists. He recently used Jammcard to find a guitarist for singer-songwriter Danielle Ponder, whom he manages. The greatest potential use for the service, Windish says, is for smaller artists who lack the capital of more established artists.

“Writing messages, asking friends of friends, that works if you’re well connected, but not everyone. You are thinking of the financial aspect here; It becomes a huge financial hurdle for international acts to get visas and bring a whole band from abroad,” says Windish. “As a solo act, it doesn’t make much sense to fly a band in, but what other option do you have when you come up? This is a real option. You can find good musicians and save tens of thousands of dollars by bringing a band. Most artists don’t have thousands to spend on it [and] they can’t afford a musical director, that’s a better alternative.”

Lovano says he’d eventually like to expand the app more to include less-established or amateur musicians, and to start with, the company launched Jammcard Mentors earlier this year, but to attract top-notch talent to the launch, Jammcard needed to make sure the most of them are -demand touring musicians. The strategy seems to have paid off; Jammcard musicians were hired to work with them Harry Styles, Gwen Stefani, the Chainsmokers, Zedd and Christina Perri, among others. In Perri’s case, the company says, Jammcard provided all of the musicians she recently hired for a number of talk show appearances, including the today show, ellen and the Late Late Show with James Corden.

Jammcard could also have appeal in the post-Covid touring environment, where many musicians and road crew members have stopped touring altogether or found a new direction of work, requiring artists to find new people to tour with. According to Lovano, Jammcard recently reached similar usage figures as before live music was shut down two years ago.

Perhaps the most distinctive (and assertive) offering comes from its exclusive parties called JammJams. The events, which began as informal jam sessions at Lovano’s house a few years ago, have evolved into bespoke private concerts, the most recent of which received a sponsorship from Sony-presented gospel choir The Samples, best known as the collective responsible for him collaborating with Kanye West for Sunday worship sessions.

The Samples played for a few hundred Jammcard members and other music industry friends in late May at a nondescript studio in Frogtown, Los Angeles. Lovano, who looks and sounds a little like Jeremy Strong and resembles an investment banker more than an accomplished musician, ended the night pounding the drums and playing with a rotating hodgepodge of musicians.

Jammcard makes its money through various avenues such as sponsorships and corporate partnerships. For example, the JammJam with the samples was a partnership with Sony. Jammcard also charges a 10% fee for those booking Jammcard musicians.

For now, membership is free, but Lovano says the company may charge a subscription fee. Jammcard is only a few years old and not yet profitable, but Lovano says this is the company’s first year focused on revenue and that artists spent $500,000 in the first half of this year to support musicians over to book the app.

Matt McGuire, drummer and musical director for The Chainsmokers, is also active on the platform and frequently uses it to hire musicians for many of the duo’s television appearances, album release parties and other one-off events for the group. McGuire estimates he has hired over 20 musicians through Jammcard and notes that while his own network of musicians comes first, a service like Jammcard is convenient and helps give someone a chance.

“We’re picky about our choices, so it makes sense to go through the app because we’re confident we know the people we’re seeing are professionals,” says McGuire. “It also allows us to give musicians opportunities that probably wouldn’t have been considered before, as it expands the choices. Elmo is making a platform that fills a hole that still exists in this industry.”

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Roman Villarreal’s first-ever retrospective, South Chicago Legacies, opens Friday at the Intuit Art Center https://maoriart.net/roman-villarreals-first-ever-retrospective-south-chicago-legacies-opens-friday-at-the-intuit-art-center/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 13:51:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/roman-villarreals-first-ever-retrospective-south-chicago-legacies-opens-friday-at-the-intuit-art-center/ WEST TOWN – A prolific Southeast Side urban artist will be hosting his first retrospective this weekend – an exhibition that reflects the complexities of life in his home community of South Chicago. Roman Villarreal is the self-taught artist behind a lakeside mermaid whose origins remained a mystery for more than a decade, a tribute […]]]>

WEST TOWN – A prolific Southeast Side urban artist will be hosting his first retrospective this weekend – an exhibition that reflects the complexities of life in his home community of South Chicago.

Roman Villarreal is the self-taught artist behind a lakeside mermaid whose origins remained a mystery for more than a decade, a tribute to Southeast Side workers in Steelworkers Park, a sculpture of native wildlife in Big Marsh Park, and numerous other public works.

Villarreal will host its South Chicago Legacies retrospective Friday at the Intuit Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art, 756 N. Milwaukee Ave. in West Town, to debut. The exhibition, which features more than 40 years of sculptures and paintings, runs until January 8th.

“Intuit allows me to share the Southeast Side with the world, not just Chicago,” Villarreal said at the exhibit’s soft launch Thursday.

“One might ponder the ugliness of urban life — what it is, regardless of what we say [ugly],” he said. “But there’s also good points. There’s also beauty and pride. There’s all these things mixed together.”

The arts center is offering free admission on the first weekend of South Chicago Legacies. It is open on Fridays from 11am to 8pm and on Saturdays and Sundays from 11am to 6pm.

Recognition: Maxwell Evans/Block Club Chicago
Created in the 1980s, the limestone and slate sculpture “Lost II” depicts a woman carrying a parrot on her shoulder, symbolizing the effects of cocaine addiction. A companion piece on display, “Lost I,” shows the effects of heroin addiction.

The artworks, curated by Intuit’s Alison Amick, take visitors on a tour of life in South Chicago amid the decline and eventual death of the steel industry that boosted its economy.

Some pieces reference the numbness of substance use and the grief induced by violence. Others bring the viewer into the shared joy of a neighborhood parade and brotherhood among young brown and black men serving in the Vietnam War. Others draw on centuries of Aztec and Mexican symbolism.

In addition to Villarreal’s attention to detail and skillful technique, what sets him apart is his ability to combine different perspectives into a unique vision, says Amick.

“He was really able to bring his subjects to life in a variety of mediums, from the tall poplar pieces to the Carrara marble,” Amick said. “He is fearless in what he tackles, the materials he selects and his commitment to presenting his stories and the stories of those he sees and engages with.”

Recognition: Maxwell Evans/Block Club Chicago
“The Nation,” an example of Villarreal’s “collage” style of sculpting, features tattoos that read “mi vida loca” and a Pachuco cross — both symbols of urban Chicano culture, Villarreal said.

With symbols such as syringes, skeletons and saints, clear themes run through the exhibition. But its beauty — and the beauty of urban art in general — is that the pieces are open to interpretation, Villarreal said.

The faces of the two boxers featured in the sculpture “In a Clinch” appear fused together, much like the faces of a kissing couple in a foam piece called “The Parade” on display across the exhibition.

A viewer of the play once asked Villarreal if the two boxers would kiss. That wasn’t his intention; “Not even close,” he said.

But he was touched when the viewer – whose father was a boxer – said he saw the fighters share a moment of familial or platonic intimacy, despite the violence of their sport.

“It was so cool for me to hear that someone sees my work in this way,” said Villarreal. “It was important to share that moment from someone else who saw it in a very different light.”

Recognition: Maxwell Evans/Block Club Chicago
“In a Clinch” features two boxers in a defensive maneuver while “The Rainbow Lounge” appears in the background.

Villarreal lives the mix of grace and toughness that is reflected in his works and in his community, he said.

The Bush native first grew his signature mustache to hide a scar from a violent attack that split his lip in two. As a young man he was a gang member and experienced the horrors of the Vietnam War.

He is also “a man from planet earth” who rejects any form of discrimination; who sees Mother Nature as his collaborator in sculpture; who raves about the unique qualities of each stone he carves.

“I could live at peace with almost anyone,” Villarreal said. “Don’t get me wrong, I’m not a pacifist. You hit me, I’ll hit you back. An urban person will defend himself. … When we need to be real, we’re real, but we don’t like crossing that path.”

“Brothers” follows Villarreal and his fellow members of the Royal Knights, a defunct South Chicago gang.
The photo that inspired Brothers. A young Villarreal stands in the center of the photo, wearing sunglasses.

Villarreal fits right in with Intuit’s mission to nurture self-taught artists and those “who haven’t received attention from the mainstream art world,” Amick said.

She was introduced to Villarreal’s work through William Swislow – a board member of Intuit whose recent book Lakefront Anonymous documents stone carvings like those at Promontory Point – and has spent the last year interviewing and curating Villarreal’s pieces for the exhibition.

“Roman’s work really deserves such a wider audience,” said Amick. “He has so much to share and such amazing work. Much of this is in his studio or home, in addition to public artworks throughout the city of Chicago. We wanted to bring his work here.”

Even if South Chicago Legacies ends early next year, Chicagoans should continue to support Intuit and other venues that have non-traditional creatives at their core, Villarreal said.

“This museum is special,” he said. “You’re doing something so important: you represent the outside world with pride. That’s a big plus for us urban artists.”

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Net-a-Porter has added fine art to its luxury mix, starting with exclusive editions by Guy Bourdin, the ‘god of fashion photography’. https://maoriart.net/net-a-porter-has-added-fine-art-to-its-luxury-mix-starting-with-exclusive-editions-by-guy-bourdin-the-god-of-fashion-photography/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 19:04:12 +0000 https://maoriart.net/net-a-porter-has-added-fine-art-to-its-luxury-mix-starting-with-exclusive-editions-by-guy-bourdin-the-god-of-fashion-photography/ Net-a-Porter is known for delivering a scarce selection of fashion, beauty and lifestyle products direct to the doors of its global “EIPs” – that would be extremely important people – with same-day service in a signature black box tied with a bow . Now the luxury e-tailer is venturing into art. In partnership with AP8, […]]]>

Net-a-Porter is known for delivering a scarce selection of fashion, beauty and lifestyle products direct to the doors of its global “EIPs” – that would be extremely important people – with same-day service in a signature black box tied with a bow .

Now the luxury e-tailer is venturing into art. In partnership with AP8, a new art e-commerce platform, it curates a single-artist series of museum-quality prints that are published in limited editions on Net-a-Porter.

“Our goal is to deliver the same world-class level of curation and expertise that represents all of our buying,” said Lea Cranfield, the company’s chief buying and merchandising officer, in a statement. And yes: the art also comes with same-day service.

“There’s a lot of confidence when you discover new designers on Net-a-Porter – it has their seal of approval,” said AP8 curator Viola Raikhel. The aim of the partnership, she added, “is to make [buying] Art and photography are as accessible as luxury and fashion retail online.”

With her London art consultancy 1858 Ltd. Raikhel has advised clients from the Venice Biennale and Sotheby’s Institute to Louis Vuitton. She co-founded AP8 with her partner from 1858, Harvey Mendelson and Paul Rapaport, who had previously worked in-house for luxury brands such as Moncler.

The ease of adding to the cart and seamless transactions of online shopping “has historically not been available in the art world,” Raikhel said. “Essentially, we are creating collectors from a whole new audience of fashionistas who might not have had access to the auction houses and dealers or the knowledge necessary to do business in the art market.”

Guy Bourdin, Charles Jourdan ad campaign, Spring 1979. Courtesy Guy Bourdin Estate, 2022.

AP8 will organize IRL exhibitions – two to four a year, each spotlighting a single artist – to coincide with his drops in Net-a-Porter’s so-called “Art Room”. It launched this month with a collection of 10 prints by the late great Guy Bourdin, each offered in a limited edition of 999.

“Guy Bourdin, the god of fashion photography, seemed like a natural fit,” Raikhel said. “He elevated it to an art form.”

Bourdin (1928–1991) shot campaigns for brands such as Chanel and Charles Jourdan while being a regular for French Fashion from 1955 to the 1980s, creating colorful photographs characterized by their eerie, narrative tableaux. Influenced by Alfred Hitchcock and Man Ray – who wrote the catalog for Bourdin’s first solo show – his surrealistically tinged works are in the collections of institutions such as MoMA, Getty and Tate Modern.

Guy Bourdin, Charles Jourdan ad campaign, Spring 1979. Courtesy Guy Bourdin Estate 2022.

Guy Bourdin, Charles Jourdan ad campaign, Spring 1979. Courtesy Guy Bourdin Estate, 2022.

Having never previously sold the artist’s work through e-commerce, the Guy Bourdin Estate agreed to license a selection of photographs to Net-a-Porter via AP8, which follows strict printing protocols used by leading auction houses, museums and the like galleries are used.

The Estate oversaw the verification of each print, each verified by a form of stenographic cryptography only discernible by scanning. Meanwhile, a buyer-registered certification code links to a unique digital watermark hidden in the print to show provenance and value.

In order not to affect the value of artworks sold in galleries and at auction, once sold these prints are never released – in handcrafted Italian chestnut frames.

“[We] have tried to find ways to accommodate the desires of Bourdin lovers who couldn’t afford it [his] works and don’t want them to find unauthorized, inferior quality posters or dubious prints,” said Frederic Arnal, the director of the estate. “In this way, the winery expands its audience and participates in the formation of a new generation of collectors.”

Below are photos Bourdin shot for Fashion Paris available as prints through Net-a-Porter ($1,865) in the 1970s and 1980s; They are also available in larger frames via AP8 (starting at $3,200), along with 20 additional Bourdin prints (all in editions of 999).

"Bourdin loved creating compositions that mixed different elements and crossed world into world, making the viewer wonder what is happening," Arnell said "and [with] a strong sense of movement." Guy Bourdin, Vogue Paris, May 1984. Courtesy Guy Bourdin Estate 2022.

“Bourdin loved creating compositions that mix different elements and intersect worlds within the world, making the viewer wonder what’s happening,” said Arnal, “and [with] a strong sense of movement.” Guy Bourdin for Fashion ParisMay 1984. Courtesy Guy Bourdin Estate, 2022.

"This work can be seen up close - the quality of the image, the raindrops on the umbrella," said Arnel. "It's a classic Bourdin composition, [reminiscent of] Hitchcock." Guy Bourdin, Vogue Paris, December 1976. Courtesy The Guy Bourdin Estate 2022.

“You can see this work up close – the quality of the image, the raindrops on the umbrella,” said Arnal. “It’s a classic Bourdin composition, [reminiscent of] Hitchcock.” Guy Bourdin for Fashion ParisDecember 1976. Courtesy Guy Bourdin Estate, 2022.

Guy Bourdin, Vogue Paris, Summer 1978. Courtesy Guy Bourdin Estate 2022.

Guy Bourdin for Fashion ParisSummer 1978. Courtesy Guy Bourdin Estate, 2022.

Guy Bourdin, Vogue Paris, July 1978. Courtesy Guy Bourdin Estate 2022.

Guy Bourdin for Fashion ParisJuly 1978. Courtesy Guy Bourdin Estate, 2022.

Guy Bourdin, Vogue Paris, May 1977. Courtesy Guy Bourdin Estate 2022.

Guy Bourdin for Fashion ParisMay 1977. Courtesy Guy Bourdin Estate, 2022.

Guy Bourdin, Vogue Paris, March 1972. Courtesy Guy Bourdin Estate 2022.

Guy Bourdin for Fashion ParisMarch 1972. Courtesy Guy Bourdin Estate, 2022.

Guy Bourdin, Vogue Paris, Summer 1978, on location at the Fontainebleau Hotel in Miami.  Courtesy of Guy Bourdin Estate 2022.

Guy Bourdin for Fashion Paris, Summer 1978, on location at the Fontainebleau Hotel in Miami. Courtesy Guy Bourdin Estate, 2022.

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Summer art camps for kids offer a world of opportunity and unleashed creativity in Anne Arundel County – Capital Gazette https://maoriart.net/summer-art-camps-for-kids-offer-a-world-of-opportunity-and-unleashed-creativity-in-anne-arundel-county-capital-gazette/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 12:05:25 +0000 https://maoriart.net/summer-art-camps-for-kids-offer-a-world-of-opportunity-and-unleashed-creativity-in-anne-arundel-county-capital-gazette/ Call it the culture cure. In a classroom at Maryland Hall, 6-year-old Annapolis native Lucy Laperouse leapt like a cheetah across the floor as the beat picked up in “Fast Slow Action Song.” A moment later the pace slowed dramatically and Lucy’s limbs resembled those of a tortoise crawling at a leisurely pace. Lucy was […]]]>

Call it the culture cure.

In a classroom at Maryland Hall, 6-year-old Annapolis native Lucy Laperouse leapt like a cheetah across the floor as the beat picked up in “Fast Slow Action Song.” A moment later the pace slowed dramatically and Lucy’s limbs resembled those of a tortoise crawling at a leisurely pace.

Lucy was having so much fun that she didn’t realize she was taking basic lessons in fractions while syncing her moves to the music.

Across the hall, Kalese Slade, 14, of Annapolis, under the guidance of Maryland Hall’s outreach coordinator Kenneth Starkes, dyed the orange hair on her drawing of animated action hero Kim Possible.

Kalese is great at sketching and even better at writing poetry. She works to integrate text and images into a single work of art, which requires her to seamlessly switch back and forth between left-brain logic and right-brain intuition.

That’s all the evidence Jackie Coleman and Claudette McDonald need that art can help reverse the damage done to children during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The impact that COVID has had on learning has been just devastating,” said McDonald, Maryland Hall’s education coordinator. “I hear from teachers that they feel they have to teach everything that they would normally cover in two school years in just one.”

Reading and math grades have plummeted across the country, according to a study released in March by the Brookings Institute in Washington DC. Worse still, the gap in test scores between the poorest schools and their higher-income peers widened. Educators have long known that prison officials look to third-grade test scores — the year, Coleman said, children learn from reading to reading — to calculate how many prison cells need to be built in the future.

“I’m a big proponent of integrating arts into the curriculum because it benefits the whole person,” said Coleman, executive director of Maryland Hall.

“We know that not everyone learns the same way. Some people are kinesthetic learners and some people are auditory learners. Art classes activate multiple intelligences.”

A study of 25,000 California college students published in 2005 concluded that students who participated in the arts had higher verbal and math scores on their SATs than students who did not act in plays, paint watercolors, or perform in a band.

“The arts are a powerful tool,” said Coleman. “You can open the mind and the heart and even the soul.”

In Anne Arundel County, art classes don’t have to stop when the school year ends.

Art camps are everywhere from Maryland Hall to the Anne Arundel County Parks and Recreation Department’s Abrakadoodle arts programs to private music schools and community theaters. There’s a camp for every interest and price, from free to two-week pre-professional sessions costing four figures. And even the most expensive programs offer scholarships.

While this article cannot include all of the summer arts camps in the county, below are five that are likely to appeal to a variety of interests.

1661 Bay Head Road, Annapolis. 410-757-2281. childrenstheaterofannapolis.org

The Children’s Theater of Annapolis, now concluding its 63rd season, is the forefather of youth programming in Annapolis. The company has been training the artists and crew of tomorrow since 1959 and has had its own building for a dozen years.

Kids ages 5 to 18 can attend week-long cabarets ($200-$270) where they practice musical styles from musical theater to hip-hop, or three-week production-intensive camps ($800) where they work for Audition and rehearse a production and perform while attending skill-building workshops from improvisation to dance.

Two productions are taking center stage this summer: Disney’s Descendants: The Musical and Footloose the Musical: Youth Edition.

“We provide a safe environment for children to explore their emotions, creativity, imagination, and develop empathy,” said Jason Kimmel, the theater’s director of education.

“One of our alumni is a lawyer and says our camps helped her overcome her fear of public speaking. We also have graduates who are now dancing on Broadway.”

Art Farm Studios, 111 Chinquapin Round Road, Suite 200, Annapolis. 443-360-5278. artfarmannapolis.com

ArtFarm is a 4,000-square-foot space for doers in Annapolis, co-created by Darin Gilliam and Alison Harbaugh. In July and August, ArtFarm offers courses in everything from producing plays and building props to the intricacies of sampling music and creating beats. Prices range from $275 to $475 for week-long sessions.

But the camp closest to Harbaugh is her Fearless Girls Photography camp. This year, for the first time, ArtFarm is offering a photography camp for fearless boys.

Harbaugh was inspired to start the photography workshops after working at the Capital Gazette for two years, overcoming her fear of asking complete strangers for permission to take her pictures.

“These are empowerment camps,” Harbaugh said.

“I was scared to death to go out and talk to people on the street. But I’ve learned to take the camera and turn it around and tell stories in community. That’s what I’m teaching these kids.”

She said former campers used their newfound skills with a camera to earn pocket money.

“Some of our kids went on to start small businesses,” she said. “They photograph babies and graduations and portraits of their friends. It’s really cool to see her confidence growing.”

The Key School, 534 Hillsmere Drive, Annapolis. 410-263-3023. filmstersacademy.com

“What we’re doing is a little crazy,” said Lee Anderson, half of the duo that founded Filmsters Academy Film Studio. “We’re taking very, very expensive devices and putting them in the hands of kids.”

The academy teaches the entire creative process of filmmaking, from pitching an idea to writing, performing, filming, and editing films.

Filmster offers one-week camps for beginners ($845), 10-day camps for advanced students ($1,650), and two-week intensive sessions for advanced students ($1,995) in July and August.

The advanced sessions are by invitation only. But all camps culminate in a mini film festival featuring films created by aspiring filmmakers.

“We don’t know of any other program like ours in the whole country,” said Filmsters co-founder Patti White. “The best film schools in the country know who our children are.”

801 Chase St Annapolis. 410-263-5544. Marylandhall.org

During a typical summer, Maryland Hall welcomes 1,200 campers ages 5 to 18 who attend 47 weekly summer camps in the visual arts, dance or music. Kids can create a glass portrait of their pets, learn basic hip-hop moves, or learn to play guitar with legendary luthier Paul Reed Smith.

Because the building is owned by Anne Arundel County Public Schools, every student enrolled in the system can attend camps and classes for free. Students from private schools and other public counties who wish to enroll will pay anywhere from $35 to $475 per session.

Maryland Hall also leases space to private partners such as Smith’s Naptown Jazz. These private contractors set their own fees that apply to everyone who signs up.

“There’s been such a lack of personal, human connection over the past two years,” Coleman said.

“Children have not had the opportunity to process their emotional and social needs. In Europe someone who is depressed can go to a doctor and get a prescription for an artistic experience and insurance will cover it.

“Imagine if the youth of America had the same opportunity.”

1460 Ritchie Hwy, Suites 105-106, Arnold. 410-349-1456. https://www.schoolofrock.com/locations/annapolis/music-camps

While his headbanging bandmates bounced up and down, Top Chotipradit, 13, from Annapolis, sang the opening chords of Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” at the School for Rock in Arnold.

Top’s father plays the guitar and Top has loved the instrument since he was a toddler.

“It’s hard to explain,” he said, “but I can kind of just hear the music. I started playing guitar three years ago and I learned very quickly.”

This summer School of Rock is offering seven week-long summer camps for teens between the ages of 5 and 18 of all skill levels who play guitar, bass, drums, keyboards or sing from late June to mid-August. Week-long sessions cost $500 and range from songwriting to pop-punk and rock and 90’s bands to a beginner’s session.

The camps culminate in a concert at the end of the week.

“It’s a great way to practice music that’s absolutely evolving,” said Olivia Boehmler, 14, of Edgewater. “It’s not just mindless practice. Instead, you’re working toward a big goal.”

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The director of ‘My Policeman’ opens up about Harry Styles’ gay sex scenes https://maoriart.net/the-director-of-my-policeman-opens-up-about-harry-styles-gay-sex-scenes/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 21:45:57 +0000 https://maoriart.net/the-director-of-my-policeman-opens-up-about-harry-styles-gay-sex-scenes/ International sex symbol and LGBTQ ally Harry Styles will perform his first gay sex scene in the highly anticipated film ‘My Policeman’ directed by Michael Grandage. Grandage recently spoke about the process of filming these intimate moments with Styles, who stars as an undercover cop in the 1950s drama. In a Vanity Fair interview published […]]]>

International sex symbol and LGBTQ ally Harry Styles will perform his first gay sex scene in the highly anticipated film ‘My Policeman’ directed by Michael Grandage.

Grandage recently spoke about the process of filming these intimate moments with Styles, who stars as an undercover cop in the 1950s drama.

In a Vanity Fair interview published Thursday, the filmmaker described the film’s sex scenes as lovemaking “in the broadest sense of the word, something that was choreographically interesting and not just some sort of urgent sense of sex going on.”

As Vanity Fair put it, Grandage wanted to avoid “lust” while blocking out those sequences, which he says were inspired by the “very sculptural” body language of the 1959 Alain Resnais film Hiroshima Mon Amour.

Based on Bethan Roberts’ novel of the same name, My Policeman follows a gay police officer named Tom (Styles) who falls in love with a male museum curator (David Dawson) while married to a teacher (Emma Corrin).

“When they’re together, these two men seem free,” Grandage told Vanity Fair. “And then when he has to have sex or make love with his wife, he doesn’t seem to have that freedom, even in his body language.”

Distributed by Amazon, My Policeman hits theaters on October 21, almost exactly a month after Olivia Wilde’s Don’t Worry Darling, also starring Styles, hits theaters. A streaming release on Amazon Prime Video will follow on November 4th.

In an April interview with Capital FM, Styles warned against watching any of his hot upcoming projects “with your parents,” and joked that in the future he’ll need to do “another” movie that’s more family-friendly. The pop musician also shared what it was like filming sex scenes for the first time as his acting career took off.

“All I can say from personal experience is that I’ve been very fortunate to have a very trusting relationship with the people we’ve worked with,” he said.

“Above all, what happens, we do this together and we trust each other. … we can stop at any time and so on. … I had never done that before — at least on camera.”

Ever since he emerged as a featured member of British-Irish boy band One Direction, fans have long speculated about Style’s sex life and sexuality, which he openly discussed in an interview with Better Homes & Gardens earlier this year.

Initially, Styles said he was “ashamed of the idea that people even know” he was having sex — “let alone with whom.”

“But I think I got to a point where I was like, why am I ashamed?” he told the magazine. “I am a 26-year-old man who is single; It’s like, yeah, I’m having sex.”

On his sexuality, Styles said, “I’ve been very open about it with my friends, but that’s my personal experience; it belongs to me.”

“The whole point of where we should go, which is to accept everyone and be more open, is that it doesn’t matter, and it’s about not labeling everything, not clarifying what boxes you tick,” he added .

With My Policeman and Don’t Worry Darling on the horizon, fans of the Harry’s House artist in Los Angeles are bracing for a Harry Styles plunge just days after My Policeman hits theaters , the pop sensation will play his first of 15 consecutive shows at The Forum in Inglewood.

Tickets for the concert series in LA, which starts on October 23rd and ends on November 15th, are already sold out.

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Yes, we fact-checked these watercolors – ProPublica https://maoriart.net/yes-we-fact-checked-these-watercolors-propublica/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/yes-we-fact-checked-these-watercolors-propublica/ This column was originally published in Not Shutting Up, a newsletter about the issues of journalism and democracy. Sign up for it here. My colleague Irena Hwang mostly works with numbers. An electrical engineer by training, she turns impossible data sets into understandable sentences that word-bound people like me can understand. What she does seems […]]]>

My colleague Irena Hwang mostly works with numbers. An electrical engineer by training, she turns impossible data sets into understandable sentences that word-bound people like me can understand. What she does seems like a kind of intellectual alchemy, extracting solid and valuable facts from barely visible particles of knowledge.

But this year, as Oregon Public Broadcasting and ProPublica worked to document the extent to which Pacific Northwest salmon hatcheries are failing to keep fish at healthy levels, another of Irena’s talents came to the fore. One she had kept secret.

Since November, we—and by that I mean them—had been trying to count fish: specifically, the large numbers of salmon released into the Columbia River by government-funded hatcheries to swim down to the Pacific, and the much smaller number that caught the hard Graduated back upstream. Her co-reporter, OPB’s Tony Schick, found through interviews that not nearly enough salmon survived. Despite more than a century of US promises, native tribes lost access to traditional fishing and with it their way of life. Counting fish would help us prove that.

The publicly available data and expert reports have measured fish flow in myriad ways, and Irena’s analysis goals seemed to change with every conversation. Irena read hundreds of pages of reports, spent hours conducting interviews with fish scientists, and along the way encountered a number of dry riverbeds—data wise.

Little did I know, however, that Irena was working on more than just the dates. In mid-April, at one of our weekly project meetings, she presented a draft of the story art, including some fish icons from around the web, and asked us which style we liked best. I hadn’t really focused on them, but I saw that they were very different. One, a digital illustration with hard lines and consistent colors, was almost caricature. Another looked hand drawn, with subtle color variations. We all agreed that the more detailed and colorful version is best. In hindsight, Irena was about to shake her hand, but I didn’t think anything of it at the time.

Irena, however, was thinking. “I did a lot of art when I was a kid,” she later told me, but “when it came time to go to college, I got into highly technical work, and the art just fell by the wayside .” She said she occasionally thought about art but felt paralyzed. “I didn’t feel creative enough to be, quote, a true artist.” As she worked her way through a bachelor’s, master’s, and PhD in electrical engineering, Irena said she lost motivation more than a few times each year to sketch or even to scribble in the margins of a notebook. She stopped visiting art museums.

Then the fish project rolled around. There was an empty space for illustrations to go. And she thought that maybe she had avoided art because “it was this big open-ended thing”; that it might be easier with some structure. A simple task – just four anatomically correct fish! – with a deadline seemed to be exactly the kind of closed project Irena was looking for. She wrote to one of ProPublica’s picture editors, Andrea Wise, and shared two older posts she had made. Andrea immediately said that she would like to do some artistic directing, while Irena created illustrations for the story.

A watercolor cat portrait Irena Hwang painted for a friend in 2017. This was one of the pieces she shared with ProPublica’s visuals team when she asked if she could do fish illustrations for an article. She says she’s learned a lot more about fish anatomy since designing the satirical crest in the background.


Recognition:
Courtesy of Irena Hwang


Seen in this way, painting and data work are very different. As Irena said, “Coding taps into the part of my brain that’s good at planning complex tasks and breaking them down into small components. But when I paint, I let the other half of my brain take over, the part that seems a little mysterious and muddy and does things because they just feel – and look – right.”

But while that distinction is very real, it’s not the whole picture. As I spoke to Irena about the four beautiful watercolors she created for this project, I also realized that she brought the same intensity to her art that she brings to her data work every day. She briefly considered creating stylized fish in Adobe Illustrator—it would have been easier—but settled on drawing fish, which were as accurate as they were beautiful. And painting visually accurate fish for ProPublica took a lot of research.

Stylized illustration of a salmon

Irena tried a stylized digital approach to illustrate the salmon before opting for watercolors instead.


Recognition:
Irena Hwang/Pro Publica

When she tried to find the right source photos to base her work on, the variables were almost as endless as the data she analyzed. For one, “there is a lot of sexual dimorphism in fish”; That means the males and females of a species can look very different. There are also geographic differences: an Alaskan chinook may mature to a completely different color than an Oregon chinook.

In addition, each fish looks different at different points in its journey, sometimes undergoing dramatic changes as it swims upstream to spawn. Most salmon species are silver in the ocean but break up to browns, greens and bright reds as they make the freshwater journey to the spawning grounds. Chinook, Coho, and Sockeye males can develop a distinctive, hooked upper jaw. Male sockeye has a prominent hump. And, Irena pointed out to me, fish actually look different in water than they do in hand when held up for the trophy shot. She had created files and folders with fish research. But if she could only depict one image of a coho salmon, which coho salmon would it be?

“There were a lot of really funny nerds,” she admitted. “One of my nightmares was that someone would write and say that’s not what a salmon looks like.”

Ultimately, Irena had to make some key decisions she could stand by: she focused on fish when they returned to spawn, and decided that these brightly colored fish would have a more iconic recognition than her silvery ocean self. She focused on underwater fish to capture their brilliant colors in their original state. And noting that many of the images available were of the more colorful male fish, she decided, “Yes, we’re going to show female fish!”


Surely it was an artist who created these watercolors for publication. Even Irena seemed to experience it that way. “What I love about watercolor is that it’s very transparent. You work in layers, so every time you add a layer it’s like you’re revealing something that’s been hidden in the paper all along, waiting for you to bring it out.”

Irena’s pictures of what she calls “my setup”. The fish were drawn in her apartment on 8 1/2 x 11 inch paper, which she described as “manageable size.”


Recognition:
Courtesy of Irena Hwang

But the engineer in her wasn’t far away. These images needed to be checked. Irena needed to know that despite her careful selection, her pictures had turned out just right.

Some of the flaws were obvious: she had forgotten to give the Chinook “something that looks like a nose on a salmon.” We fought over the technical term. She googled it. “Nostrils! I had to give him nostrils!”

Some of the flaws were in the eye of the beholder: She sent three of the images to Tony, her co-reporter, who shared them with his more experienced fishing colleagues at OPB. One suggested that the Chinook’s jaw should be more hooked. “I do the females,” Irena fired back, ending this problem.

The colors were perhaps the biggest issue of all. The original image Irena edited for the Chinook was taken in a sunny area of ​​a river, resulting in a fish that was a little more golden in hue than most anglers would recognize. Photoshop helped turn it into a more recognizable olive brown tone.

And then there were the total misfires. Irena mentioned that there had been an earlier Steelhead painting that was completely different from the one we had published. She had struggled with this because mature steelheads have intense colors, but the source image she was working on was full of colors that Irena feared would combine into a muddy mess. To avoid a monotonous fish, she chose paint colors that accentuated the highlights – and ended up with one that was too bright.

i wanted to see it So she sent me this message via Slack: “Was that even a Steelhead? In hindsight it is unclear.”

She added a little grimace emoji and then the photo of her earlier painting.

The Steelhead painting published by OPB and ProPublica is on the left; the one left is on the right.


Recognition:
Irena Hwang/Pro Publica

Steelhead or not, I honestly wouldn’t have known. I wrote back to Irena: ‘It’s very nice. Just a different light, in my opinion…”

I asked Irena about painting as a journalist. “It was definitely fun. It was also stressful because I’d never painted on time,” she said. On the other hand, it was clear that there was something to their concept of making art within structures: Before, “I was walking around thinking I was too much an engineer to be an artist and too much an artist to be an engineer”, she thought. The fish project seemed to bring these two different sides of their brains closer together. “That’s why I love journalism so much.”

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Funeral for Uvalde girl who dreamed of going to art school https://maoriart.net/funeral-for-uvalde-girl-who-dreamed-of-going-to-art-school/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 13:08:39 +0000 https://maoriart.net/funeral-for-uvalde-girl-who-dreamed-of-going-to-art-school/ UVALDE, Texas (AP) — Mourners Sunday remembered a girl who was an aspiring artist whose joy at reaching the double-digit age of 10 charmed broken hearts around the world. Alithia Ramirez was among 19 children who died along with their two teachers on May 24 when an 18-year-old gunman opened fire with an AR-15 style […]]]>

UVALDE, Texas (AP) — Mourners Sunday remembered a girl who was an aspiring artist whose joy at reaching the double-digit age of 10 charmed broken hearts around the world.

Alithia Ramirez was among 19 children who died along with their two teachers on May 24 when an 18-year-old gunman opened fire with an AR-15 style rifle at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. Alithia’s funeral was scheduled for Sunday afternoon at First Baptist Church. The funerals will continue until mid-June.

___

Alithia Ramirez

Ten-year-old Alithia Ramirez was a loving and caring girl who loved to draw.

Her obituary described her as bright and an “extremely loving young lady who dreamed of attending art school in Paris. She was very reliable, always wanted to take care of everyone and was a role model for her siblings.”

Alithia’s parents met with President Joe Biden during his visit to Uvalde on May 29, KENS-TV reported. They said Biden asked if he could hang one of their drawings in the White House.

Ryan Ramirez said Biden told parents, “Whenever we hang it, we’ll send you a picture of where it’s hanging and you can see it anytime.”

Ryan Ramirez rushed to Robb Elementary when he heard about the shooting. He told KTRK-TV he just wanted to find his daughter and bring her home.

After her death, a photo of Alithia was shared around the world, smiling broadly while wearing a tie-dye T-shirt that read “Out of single digits” and “I’m 10.” Her birthday was the 28th.

Her father later posted the same photo to Facebook without words, but with Alithia wearing angel wings.

“It’s a nightmare for parents. This is the worst of the worst,” Ryan Ramirez told KENS-TV on Wednesday.

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More on the Uvalde, Texas shooting: https://apnews.com/hub/uvalde-school-shooting

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