Art New Zealand – Maori Art http://maoriart.net/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 03:27:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://maoriart.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Art New Zealand – Maori Art http://maoriart.net/ 32 32 News Updates from HT: Singapore resumes flights to India starting today and all the latest news | Latest India News https://maoriart.net/news-updates-from-ht-singapore-resumes-flights-to-india-starting-today-and-all-the-latest-news-latest-india-news/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 03:27:32 +0000 https://maoriart.net/news-updates-from-ht-singapore-resumes-flights-to-india-starting-today-and-all-the-latest-news-latest-india-news/ Here is today’s top news, analysis, and opinion. Find out all about the latest news and other news updates from Hindustan Times. As of today, Singapore will resume flights to India. Details here Beginning Monday, Singapore will resume commercial flights with India through its Inoculated Routes (VTL) facility with six designated flights daily from Chennai, […]]]>

Here is today’s top news, analysis, and opinion. Find out all about the latest news and other news updates from Hindustan Times.

As of today, Singapore will resume flights to India. Details here

Beginning Monday, Singapore will resume commercial flights with India through its Inoculated Routes (VTL) facility with six designated flights daily from Chennai, Delhi and Mumbai. Continue reading

“Unfortunately we have a very special player for him”: Rathour praises India’s “ideal team man” for bold knocking

India’s punch coach Vikram Rathour praised India’s “ideal team man” Wriddhiman Saha after the veteran’s hard blow against New Zealand on day four of the first test in Kanpur, but admitted that he was due to the presence of “extremely special player” Rishabh Pant, who was run by the Test series was rested. Continue reading

Abhishek Bachchan gives Sa Re Ga Ma Pa candidate Sanjana a sidelong eye after seeing her with Aishwarya Rai. has compared

Abhishek Bachchan recently appeared on the singing reality show Sa Re Ga Ma Pa on Sunday promoting his upcoming film Bob Biswas. During the episode, the actor was shown a clip of a candidate named Sanjana and her husband who praised them. Continue reading

Stars honor Virgil Abloh: Priyanka Chopra, Gigi Hadid, Sonam Kapoor, Hailey Bieber, David Beckham and more pay tribute

The fashion industry and the world’s greatest celebrities mourn the untimely death of Virgil Abloh, the artistic director of Louis Vuitton menswear and founder of the Off-White clothing line. Continue reading

Omar reveals the reason for the “revival of militancy” in Kashmir and slams the Modi government

Former J&K chief minister Omar Abdullah has beaten the “Militancy Revival” center in Kashmir. Omar, who was chief minister of J&K between 2009 and 2014, said the militancy was back in Kashmir despite the removal of Art. 370. look here


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These calendars are committed to social and humanitarian causes | Chennai News https://maoriart.net/these-calendars-are-committed-to-social-and-humanitarian-causes-chennai-news/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 04:22:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/these-calendars-are-committed-to-social-and-humanitarian-causes-chennai-news/ CHENNAI: During the first wave of Covid-19, while sitting indoors, Tyag Krishnamurthy decided to try his hand at art and discovered that he had both a flair and a passion for it. When the Blue Cross of India (BCI) considered bringing out its annual calendar for the New Year, the animal lover, who is also […]]]>
CHENNAI: During the first wave of Covid-19, while sitting indoors, Tyag Krishnamurthy decided to try his hand at art and discovered that he had both a flair and a passion for it.
When the Blue Cross of India (BCI) considered bringing out its annual calendar for the New Year, the animal lover, who is also one of the BCI’s volunteer joint secretaries, decided to bring his two loved ones together and create a calendar that would make pencil sketches of critically endangered people Species included around the world.
“I selected 12 mammals such as the Bornean orangutan, Sumatran tiger, red wolf, European mink, African forest elephant, etc. to be on the IUCN’s Red List of Endangered Species,” says Krishnamurthy who started drawing in October.
Towards the end of the year, various organizations bring out calendars that highlight the causes and problems they are advocating. They also serve as fundraising initiatives that help the NGOs support their efforts.
BCI’s calendar, launched last week, is available for 299 people and can be booked through their website or FB page for a pickup or delivery at the shelter. “All donations are used to care for more than 2,000 animal shelter,” says Krishnamurthy.
The theme of this year’s Besant Memorial Animal Dispensary (BMAD) calendar is “Influencers and Survivors”. “Every year we publish a fundraiser calendar that creates awareness of our work and shows the realities of the world, whether it is the plight of community animals, abandoning pets or large animal welfare that is often overlooked,” says Dr. Josika Navukkarasu, veterinarian, BMAD.
Every month of the 2022 calendar, an influencer will pose with one of the animals that went through and overcame some difficulties, says Dr. Josika. “For example, we have actor Gayathri Shankar posing with one of our ponies, Arya, who was temporarily paraplegic after a traffic accident when we recorded her.”
The calendar at the price of 500 is available from the BMAD and can also be ordered online from the end of December.
Rare musical instruments are the theme of Euphony 2022, the calendar from Sahodaran, an LGBT support group in Chennai. “It shows instruments like Mizhaave, a rare copper drum that is only played in Kerala’s Koothambalams as an accompaniment to Chakkiyarkoothu or Nangiarkoothu; Edakka, a small drum that is slung over the shoulder; Elathallam or cymbals, Thutheri, an old trumpet; Nagphani, a serpentine horn, “says Sunil Menon, founder of Sahodaran, who bought instruments from Sivakumar, an instrument collector in Chennai. The calendar costs 1,500.


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NZ border meets Super Rugby, A-Leagues, NBL | Augusta-Margaret River Mail https://maoriart.net/nz-border-meets-super-rugby-a-leagues-nbl-augusta-margaret-river-mail/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 03:46:42 +0000 https://maoriart.net/nz-border-meets-super-rugby-a-leagues-nbl-augusta-margaret-river-mail/ The New Zealand government’s decision to ban Australians and foreigners well into 2022 has made sports laws wrong on both sides of the Tasmanian Land. The Super Rugby Pacific game faces a makeover as the New Zealand Breakers and A-Leagues NBL’s two Wellington Phoenix teams face another all-Australian campaign. On Wednesday, Jacinda Ardern’s government released […]]]>

The New Zealand government’s decision to ban Australians and foreigners well into 2022 has made sports laws wrong on both sides of the Tasmanian Land.

The Super Rugby Pacific game faces a makeover as the New Zealand Breakers and A-Leagues NBL’s two Wellington Phoenix teams face another all-Australian campaign.

On Wednesday, Jacinda Ardern’s government released a long-awaited timetable for dismantling the hard border and quarantine on arrival.

Starting January 17, kiwis in Australia can skip quarantine in favor of self-isolation.

From April 30th, Australians and other foreigners can do the same.

However, the seven-day self-isolation obligation remains – even for New Zealand citizens – which makes many sporting competitions impracticable.

The changes also mean that the ODI Women’s Cricket World Cup, which will be held in March, will be closed to foreign fans.

The government is not planning any exemptions for sports teams until there are health recommendations that support it.

Deputy Prime Minister and Sports Secretary Grant Robertson said the government’s commitment to a seven-day isolation period was firm.

“Of course I want the super rugby competition to take place, but we are always guided by the health advice,” he said.

“The advice of the Ministry of Health was consistently not to shorten the isolation time.

“So if sports teams use (self-isolation) it will take the same amount of time.”

A Rugby NZ spokesman said the organization was “digesting” the changes, while a Phoenix spokesman was optimistic.

“The Phoenix are examining what today’s government announcement means for the club to bring its men’s and women’s teams home,” the spokesman said.

“The Phoenix is ​​one of several teams / sports that are talking to Sport New Zealand about border restrictions and are hoping to play in New Zealand this season.”

The decision will not affect the Warriors, who have already committed to spending the NRL campaign in Australia in 2022 to avoid any uncertainty.

Australian Associated Press


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Ngaire Blankenberg A taste of the Smithsonian experience in Lagos https://maoriart.net/ngaire-blankenberg-a-taste-of-the-smithsonian-experience-in-lagos/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 08:27:12 +0000 https://maoriart.net/ngaire-blankenberg-a-taste-of-the-smithsonian-experience-in-lagos/ Image 2021 …: Blankenberg in Lagos. Dsc 1838: Royal models in ensembles of the Nigerian Grand Dame of Costumes, Chief Nike Okundaye-Davies. The new director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art (NMAfA) in Washington DC, Ngaire Blankenberg, led a team that created the “Taste! 24 Hours of the Smithsonian in Lagos revealed their […]]]>
Image 2021 …: Blankenberg in Lagos. Dsc 1838: Royal models in ensembles of the Nigerian Grand Dame of Costumes, Chief Nike Okundaye-Davies.

The new director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art (NMAfA) in Washington DC, Ngaire Blankenberg, led a team that created the “Taste! 24 Hours of the Smithsonian in Lagos revealed their plans for the globalization of the African arts in an exclusive interview with Yinka Olatunbosun.

Ngaire Blankenberg’s excitement is contagious even behind the mask. The newly appointed director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art had just arrived in one of Africa’s greatest creative destinations – Lagos, just in time for the art resurgence season. West Africa’s largest art fair, Art X Lagos, the African International Film Festival (AFRIFF), LagosPhoto Festival all ran in sequence and it was just fitting to bring the Smithsonian energy into the mix.

Blankenberg believes that Lagos is a popular place for art. So she made her first stop in the city that never really sleeps. Called “Taste! 24 Hours of the Smithsonian in Lagos ” was a collaborative and interactive art experience that brought visual, conceptual and performing artists together. Curated by a former Smithsonian Art Research Fellow, Temitayo Ogunbiyi, it featured sound art from Emeka Ogboh, photography and masterclasses from Ike Ude, while Ogunbiyi worked with Chef Renee Chuks on the food arts.

With a warm smile, the new director met influencers, Nollywood stars and of course on THISDAY. After her appointment in July, she will work to position the NMAfA as a more international institution serving the global African audience alongside the large African community in DC.

“One of the things that sparked this conversation is that on February 5th, 2022 we have an exhibition opening called Nollywood Portraits and the artist Ike Ude is showing off his work. We are connected to Lagos through this exhibition. We have several board members from here and just thought this was a great place for us to start. We listen and are here to work with artists and institutions in Lagos, Nigeria and across the continent. We look forward to working together for a number of reasons. One is that we really want to support the growing ecology of artists and everything that goes with them. There are artists who can be supported: institutional support, not necessarily commercial support. We want to offer platforms, conversations and opportunities as well as encounters between artists, people and institutions, ”she revealed.

Blankenberg immersed himself in the diversity of the art experience from the point of view of the Smithsonians and offered a broad perspective on the perception of art. She explained the changing nature of museums around the world and why it is important that the art projects appeal to a wider audience. They can understand and relate to the themes and subjects raised in the works.

“We work with our artists to make sure it’s an experience and engagement that doesn’t make people feel stupid. If you look at Emeka’s works in the soundscapes of Lagos, everything revolves around the senses in all these state experiences. He puts Lagos in different locations around the world and listening to the sounds of the city gives you a completely different experience.

“Tayo’s work is phenomenal. She looks at botanicals and works a lot with farmers, agricultural producers and a cook to create a flavor. It’s about what you remember when you taste it. It’s also very demanding. All the ingredients we work with are all from Nigeria, ”she said enthusiastically.
In response to fears that the Smithsonian Experience might appeal to more Nigerian artists in the diaspora, Blankenberg, who is a native of South Africa, said that the Smithsonian Experience actually targets all African artists on the continent and at large.

“I mean, as Africans we move and live in different places. That doesn’t make us any less African, but it’s also important that we understand and support the things that are happening here so that we can have a fair exchange. That’s why we’re here. We’re not starting this in DC or in the Diaspora. We are here in Lagos. I haven’t given face-to-face interviews since joining the Smithsonian in July. I wanted to talk about the future here on the continent, ”she said.

Blankenberg began her career in television and documentary production before focusing on museum management. She was born in Winnipeg and has lived in several locations around the world including Canada, New Zealand, Africa and Europe.

As a consultant, Blankenberg has an international portfolio that includes institutions large and small, including the National Gallery of Canada, Superblue of New York / Miami, the Museum and Archive of the Constitution at the Hill (Johannesburg), and the Canadian Museum for Human Rights .
Blankenberg holds a Masters of Arts in Media and Cultural Studies from the University of Natal in Durban, South Africa, and a Bachelor of Journalism from Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

It was very pleasing to see how passionately the trained journalist spoke about the networking of the arts in Nigeria and the possible perspectives of this confrontation with artists. The taste! A panel discussion on transformation presented the director of the LagosPhoto Festival, Azu Nwagbogu; Founder, ArtXLagos, Tokini Peterside and Creative Director, AFRIFF, Chioma Onyenwe. Blakenberg also announced that the layover in Lagos is a foretaste of Ike Ude: Nollywood Portraits, which opens next February at the National Museum of African Art in DC.

When asked how human trafficking at the Smithsonian’s physical National Museum of African Art has evolved since it reopened after the pandemic lockdown, she revealed it was pretty impressive.

“Smithsonian doesn’t have the full opening schedule in DC, but we’ve had really encouraging attendance levels compared to pre-pandemic levels. People really need to be in one physical space with one another. We believe there is a time and place for digital engagement and a place and time for us to be together, talk to artists and see works in real life. It’s an interactive experience that you can’t have online, ” she said.
The museum, with over 12,000 works of art that capture the different temperaments of African history from centuries to the present day, is not immune to renewed calls for works of art to be returned from Africa.

“We have bronzes that we took from you. Since I’ve been on board, Prof. Tijani has spoken to us about the future of this collection and a very strong focus of mine is what I call “decolonizing the museum”. That’s not the end of the conversation. My vision is to talk to Africans about recognizing Africa and dealing with the multilingual complex of Africa, and at the same time I am aware that Western museums were terrible for Africans. The museum practice was racist, exploitative and abusive, ”she said.

In their opinion, the foundation of the museum is engaged in a racist discourse and therefore it is imperative to return the collections – the stolen works of art – to Africa.
“I’m really looking forward to how I can change that. It’s not just about that. How do we classify works? How do we talk about it? Who is involved in decisions? Who determines what we watch? What are our partnerships? Where does the money come from? Who pays? How do we take care of things? Do we take things and put them in glass cases just because white people think they should be kept there? ”She asked thoughtfully.

As an expert in museum management, Blankenberg is committed to questioning how museums as institutions have the responsibility to interact with people in new ways, paying attention to the small details that can create inclusion and ultimately eliminate discrimination.

“To be honest, it happens in African museums as well as in Western museums. Just because a museum is in Africa doesn’t mean it doesn’t propagate Eurocentric ideas. It’s also about breaking the white taste. Not only Africans but also black people don’t trust museums. It’s like taking our cultures and putting them in cages, ”she noted.

While it may seem easier in some political areas to turn the talk of the return of art and artifacts to Africa into decisive action, the story is not the same in other countries where these works are currently exhibited.

“We have to stop causing harm. The National Commission on Museums and Monuments in Nigeria knows we have the bronzes. We have to figure out how to get it back, and that decision is not my own. It’s that of the Smithsonian and the US government. If we do damage, we must take responsibility for that damage.

We need to build trust, and once we’ve done these three things we can start getting involved. We understand that a relationship needs to be built. And one cannot separate the question of repatriation from the question of talking to artists about the future. They are the same conversation, ”she argued.

While not an expert on African art, she admitted that she is both hopeful and cynical about the works of contemporary African art.

“I think the works that are coming out now are incredible and I think that there is a moment and that moment can also go away. The stories the artists tell are unique; inform something else. There’s a huge fantasy involved, ”she said.

When asked if she had tried Nigerian food, she asked what constitutes Nigerian food.

“How what? What is Nigerian Food? I would like to go to a Nigerian restaurant. Well, I had the yam pounded. It’s good. Nigerian food means so many different things. Does it mean being grown in Nigeria? ”She asked rhetorically. The brief silence afterwards made for a thoughtful moment.


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Lots of children’s books suck. How to choose a good one. https://maoriart.net/lots-of-childrens-books-suck-how-to-choose-a-good-one/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 18:00:01 +0000 https://maoriart.net/lots-of-childrens-books-suck-how-to-choose-a-good-one/ Writer and writing teacher Eirlys Hunter on the pragmatics of holding on to magic. I have been choosing children’s books for over 60 years, for myself, for friends, for my four children and now for my three mokopuna, who are seven, four and two years old. I also taught writing to children at the IIML […]]]>

Writer and writing teacher Eirlys Hunter on the pragmatics of holding on to magic.

I have been choosing children’s books for over 60 years, for myself, for friends, for my four children and now for my three mokopuna, who are seven, four and two years old. I also taught writing to children at the IIML at Victoria University of Wellington for 12 years. I have a strong opinion of what makes a good children’s book. Not that children should only read good books; Children should be encouraged to be omnivores. But adult readers should only need to read books that they enjoy. An avid reader can sell almost any book to a child, so the most important person to please when choosing a reader is the adult who will read it. If that probably applies to you, the job is done. Choose books with pictures you like and texts that make you smile. This is even more important with toddlers because if a toddler reads a book, you can read it hundreds of times.

Good picture book text is damn hard to write, despite what princesses and celebrities seem to be thinking. Your few words should read like poetry and pay attention to rhythm, assonance, sibilance and all other language techniques. There has to be a story, a reason to turn the next page. But not a word too much, and everyone should roll their tongues and say with joy: “The-night-Max-wore-his-wolf-suit-and-made-one-and-another-misschef, his-mother-called-him-wild thing … “

Its essential quality is rhythm, but too many writers abandon rhythm in their scramble to find some rhyme. I used to warn my students about rhymes and get them to read their stories and clap to see if they were happy with the rhythm, but every year someone lurched through a text that tangled up in unnatural syntax and seedy rhythm was to force a rhyme word to end of line:

He was in such a hurry to tell his friend Joe / that he was walking on the street

The Cornucopia at Little Unity in Auckland (Photo: Supplied)

I don’t think their attempts at rhyming texts ever turned into books, but many published picture books are difficult to read because of cardiac arrhythmias. Even without the constraints of rhyme, too many picture books ignore the rhythm. To be fair, they’re not too difficult to identify, as they usually also have boring illustrations, are written in banal clichés, and tell a hackneyed story – or no story at all. They come from a cynical production line and there is no love for writing – or respect for children – in their creation. Local examples may show New Zealand wildlife in some shape or form or Christmas (not all Kiwi / Fantail / Christmas stories, okay? Just some) because they have gift potential for take-and-go shoppers who don’t know any better.

Fortunately, you can afford to ignore books like this because you will find many great titles in any bookstore if you take a moment to read the first few pages. The best are not only captivatingly rhythmic, but also imbued with what the children’s book author Katherine Paterson describes as childlike amazement. Wonder is the opposite of cynicism and world weariness, and I wish every child could stay forever permeated by it. Margaret Mahy’s stories radiate wonders. Every little person I love has a copy of The Moon and Farmer McPhee with David Elliott’s gorgeous animal illustrations Alive with joy sing and dance in the moonlight. Also on the back of the chair and The Boy You Followed Home and Bubble Trouble and The Lion in the Meadow, and, and …

Aside from rhythm (and rhyming if it’s perfect) and having fun with language, there is one other, more elusive, quality that many of my favorite picture books share, and that is an element of mystery. Children’s authors should have a note Not everything has to be explained pinned above their desks. There is no explanation for the tiger that rang the doorbell on Sophie’s door, or for the elephant that went down the whole street rumpeta rumpeta, or for the private boat that brought Max to the wild guys.

Good illustrations also include mysterious spaces for readers to get lost in, add to the text, and allow young children to have their earliest experience of art. The best illustrations are allusions and provide clues that suggest (but not dictate) a meaning and give the adult reading the opportunity to help the child decipher what is being depicted. “What do you think what he’s feeling?” “What do you think you mean?”

A grandmother and a little boy enjoying a picture book.

Eirlys Hunter reads Madoc to her seven-year-old grandson (Photo: Delivered)

Choosing a book for a child reading can be daunting. Everyone knows that The Right Book can set a child on the path to literacy and academic success, and is cited as a major influence if that child solves the climate crisis and rules the world. Specifically, the right book can make a child giggle while you have your umpteenth Zoom meeting or buy peace between siblings quarreling in the back of the car. The worst that can happen is that the child ignores the book. If so, try reading it out loud. Even very old children are happy to read aloud and there can be time for this over the summer, individually or with the whole family. In an ideal world, we would read to each other all our lives: sharing the joy of books, getting to know the characters, waiting to find out what will happen next. When on vacation, the right audiobook can transform a long drive for anyone.

When browsing I start in the New Zealand section of the bookstore. If I don’t buy books from other local authors, how can I expect someone to buy mine? And there are shelves full of brilliant local titles telling our stories in our voices, as well as stories from other times and other places, real and imaginary. There are also lots of beautiful hardback covers, Taonga for special gifts (not for the back of the car) like Gavin Bishop’s Aotearoa the New Zealand Story and now Atua – Māori Gods & Heroes (not to mention his very excellent activity book). . You’ll pay back umpteen reps and spark family discussions; Adults will get as much from them as children.

Even if you don’t believe in literary canons, there are books and stories that are cultural necessities that reading children become aware that they should know, be it Peter Gossage’s Māui and other Māori legends or Peter Rabbit or Grimm’s fairy tales. A beautiful edition of Alice in Wonderland / Through the Mirror can signal to a nine or ten year old: “I take you and your imagination seriously. You are a reader and a person who deserves this particular book. “

If you are shopping for a literal kid over eight years old today, they can tell you exactly what to get because they’ve checked the internet for the latest series they’re living in and know what day it is due in the bookstores. If it is delayed by supply chain issues, there will be another streak they started while they wait. You can buy Book Seven. If Book Seven isn’t available, do what I do and ask a bookseller. What can you buy a kid who has read all of Stacey Gregg and Kelly Wilson? What comes after Roald Dahl? If you’re unable to physically go to a bookstore and flip through the options, give them a call or go online to ask. In addition to children’s librarians, children’s booksellers are global experts on “What kind of book is next?”

Cover of two books, both in shades of blue and turquoise, Steampunky, one with an airship and the other with a compass

These books next – see epilogue (Pictures: Supplied)

And if the child is your own and disappears into Book Seven, barely speaking to you, and resentful that they are forced to get involved in family life – go to them. Ask to borrow and read Book One. Find out about the world your offspring live in. What big questions does he deal with? If the plot is complicated, ask your child to explain. Even if the story seems unoriginal and the characters seem unnatural, don’t criticize. At least now, you have a sense of the genre, humor, and tension and complexity your child is enjoying. Armed with this knowledge, your bookseller can lead you both to other authors, other series. And you will have enabled your child to show you something of the world that is currently dominating their imagination.

Short addendum from book editor Catherine Woulfe:

What Hunter forgets to mention is that she is the author of The Mapmakers’ Race, a great 2018 youth novel about a colorful troop of brothers and sisters venturing across a mountain range. In fact, race over a mountain range and map them while doing it, all without the pesky adults – other than the horrible ones they face off against. It is so good! There’s a lot at stake, but not too scary, the story is quick and intriguing, there’s a parrot and it’s really fun. Above all: the characters are wonderful. I especially love how cute Humph, the littlest, is, but also has the ability to act and dexterity – he’s a “good attendant” – and how all the children look after their sister Francie, who has to deal with crowds and loud noises, and at the same time she loves down to the smallest detail and is constantly impressed by her art.

Now there’s a sequel: The Uprising – The Mapmakers in Cruxcia is just as good and was released last month. The set is highly recommended as a Christmas present.

The Uprising – The Mapmakers in Cruxcia by Eirlys Hunter (Gecko Press, $ 22.99) is available at Unity Books Auckland and Wellington.



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International Fraud Film Festival announced for 2022 https://maoriart.net/international-fraud-film-festival-announced-for-2022/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 06:38:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/international-fraud-film-festival-announced-for-2022/ Friday, November 19, 2021, 7:38 p.m.Press release: Fraud Film Festival The New Zealand International Fraud Film Festival (IFFF) reopens its doors to present exciting fraud-based documentaries from around the world. The announcement that the IFFF will return in 2022 comes at a time when the event’s partners and sponsors are supporting International Fraud Awareness Week, […]]]>

The New Zealand International Fraud Film Festival (IFFF) reopens its doors to present exciting fraud-based documentaries from around the world.

The announcement that the IFFF will return in 2022 comes at a time when the event’s partners and sponsors are supporting International Fraud Awareness Week, November 14-20.

IFFF Chairman Paul O’Neil says the organizing team is targeting September 2022 for the fourth edition of the event and is pleased to announce that planning for the next festival is now in full swing.

“We are repeating the same format as in previous years, which has proven so successful since the beginning of the first festival in New Zealand in 2019. Film festival supporters and anti-fraud industry professionals can look forward to two days of films and documentaries followed by live expert discussions on fraud and how to prevent it. “

Paul says scammers were not deterred during the COVID-19 pandemic, nor were the filmmakers who worked hard to expose criminal activity.

“We therefore expect that there will be no shortage of brilliant content that will both entertain and educate audiences and make them think about the terrible impact of fraud on people’s lives.”

The Dutch, who first developed the concept of a film festival on the subject of fraud, managed to host an event this month despite the current challenges (https://www.fraudefilmfestival.nl/programma-2021/).

Anyone wishing to express their interest in next year’s event in New Zealand, for updates or to find out more about past festivals, can do so at fraudfilmfestival.co.nz

“During International Fraud Awareness Week, we also encourage New Zealanders to take care of themselves and to take advice from the Consumer Protection Agency that they should take a moment to pause and think:”Is that real? “when unexpectedly contacted and asked for personal information.

“Lastly, for anyone wanting a welcome distraction from the current COVID-19 pandemic, we provided a list of our top films from previous festivals for people to enjoy at home.”

All the Queen’s horses

An investigation into the largest municipal fraudster in US history who embezzled more than $ 50 million as the auditor and treasurer of Dixon, Illinois. (Rent on Apple TV)

The Armstrong Lie

A documentary by Oscar winner Alex Gibney about the comeback of Lance Armstrong turns into something completely different when Armstrong’s doping scandal explodes. (Streaming on Prime Video)

(In) honesty: the truth about lies

Documentary on the human tendency to be dishonest with the help of behavioral experts and researchers. (Streaming on DocPlay)

The Panama Papers

Alex Winter (Bill & Ted) Documentary film about the massive data leak (and the subsequent investigation by journalists) in connection with the global corruption scandal that found its way into New Zealand. (Streaming on Prime Video and DocPlay)

Sour grapes

If you’ve ever wondered if a good wine scammer is real, this documentary backs it up – the story of counterfeiters and scammers robbing fine wine collectors. (Rent on Apple TV)

There are no fakes

A painting – presumably the work of an iconic indigenous artist – takes the rock star who buys it into the tragic world of a Canadian art forgery ring. (Streaming on SkyGo)

© Scoop Media


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A marae is more than the art that adorns it https://maoriart.net/a-marae-is-more-than-the-art-that-adorns-it/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/a-marae-is-more-than-the-art-that-adorns-it/ delivered Te Rau Karamu Marae on the Pukeahu campus of Massey University is a stunning combination of art, architecture and technology. Image Courtesy: Toi Rauwhārangi College of Creative Arts Massey University. One of Wellington’s newest art spaces opened earlier this year on Hayward Tce, near Wallace Street in Mount Cook. It gives visitors a world-class […]]]>
Te Rau Karamu Marae on the Pukeahu campus of Massey University is a stunning combination of art, architecture and technology.  Image Courtesy: Toi Rauwhārangi College of Creative Arts Massey University.

delivered

Te Rau Karamu Marae on the Pukeahu campus of Massey University is a stunning combination of art, architecture and technology. Image Courtesy: Toi Rauwhārangi College of Creative Arts Massey University.

One of Wellington’s newest art spaces opened earlier this year on Hayward Tce, near Wallace Street in Mount Cook. It gives visitors a world-class art experience right here at home, but technically it’s not an art gallery. It’s more like the Sistine Chapel, adorned with amazing art from floor to ceiling. Te Rau Karamu Marae on Massey University’s Pukeahu Campus is truly a stunning combination of art, architecture and technology.

The Marae has been nominated for the Designers Institute of New Zealand Award 2021 for the best lighting design, with the dining room in particular being a feast for the eyes. Artist Israel Tangaroa Birch designed the front facade to resemble a giant glowing paua shell that illuminates the exterior of the dining room at night with a brilliant spectrum of blue, green, and purple light. Thanks to a lighting algorithm that shifts the color spectrum of the building in time with the tides in the harbor, Birch wants to transform the building into a lunar and tide calendar.

CONTINUE READING:
* University of Auckland adopts new Māori name
* Massey University marae ‘next level’ opened at the dawn ceremony
* Marae of Murihiku: Te Rau Aroha Marae, famous for carvings but known for its people
* A modern take on Tukutuku panels

Inside, Robert Jahnke's neon sculptures, inspired by woven tukutuku panels, create an optical illusion of endless reflective fish patterns made from pātiki (flounder) Courtesy: Toi Rauwhārangi College of Creative Arts Massey University.

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Inside, Robert Jahnke’s neon sculptures, inspired by woven tukutuku panels, create an optical illusion of endless reflective fish patterns made from pātiki (flounder) Courtesy: Toi Rauwhārangi College of Creative Arts Massey University.

“I wanted to create a house that breathed like the sea. It is not well known that the ocean produces 50-80 percent of the Earth’s oxygen. The work is the skin of Tangaroa, composed with unaunahi (fish scales), ”says Birch.

In this Whare Kai, Te Whaioranga or Te Taiao, Robert Jahnke’s neon sculptures, inspired by woven Tukutuku panels, create an optical illusion of endless reflective pātiki (flounder) fish patterns that stimulate the imagination, if not the appetite, of the visitors they are lucky enough to eat inside. Next to Birch and Jahnke, inside there is a huge Robyn Kahukiwa painting, preserved from the original Kuratini Marae roller that previously stood on this spot.

Working with architects from Athfield and Studio Pacific to make this vision a reality, artist Kura Puke was one of the driving forces behind the lighting design. LED lights are hidden and reflect light off surfaces to create a sense of energy emanating from the carved wakairo, painted kōwhaiwhai, and woven tukutuku of the whare. Puke, Associate Dean Māori at Massey’s College of Creative Arts, worked at the marae with colleagues Ngataiharuru Taepa, Saffronn Te Ratana, and Hemi Macgregor for nearly six years.

Artist Israel Tangaroa Birch designed the front facade to resemble a giant glowing paua shell that illuminates the exterior of the dining room at night with a brilliant spectrum of blue, green, and purple light.  Image Courtesy: Toi Rauwhārangi College of Creative Arts Massey University.

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Artist Israel Tangaroa Birch designed the front facade to resemble a giant glowing paua shell that illuminates the exterior of the dining room at night with a brilliant spectrum of blue, green, and purple light. Image Courtesy: Toi Rauwhārangi College of Creative Arts Massey University.

Taepa, Te Ratana and Macgregor have worked together on projects many times in the past, best known with ‘Ka Kata Te Pō’ in Te Manawa Palmerston North and the Auckland Art Gallery, an installation that reproduces the colors, movements and two-dimensional figurative images of the painted kōwhaiwhai as a three-dimensional sculpture into life. However, the artists are quick to remind me that it would be wrong to call this Whare a sculpture or an installation.

A marae is more than the work of art that adorns it. Te Rau Karamu Marae is an indigenous space for knowledge sharing that incorporates mātauranga Māori of te taiao, the natural environment, into the structure of the building. This environmental issue is reflected in the energy-saving lighting and heating technology in the Wharenui as well as in the works of art depicting the forest kingdom of Hinewaonui and the sacred trees of Tane Māhuta, which are so important to our existence.

The creative team called Te Kāhui Toi included Massey room designer Stuart Foster, Tikanga consultant Kurt Komene, ceramic artist Wi Taepa, and an extensive crew of cultural experts to create this masterpiece. Taepa’s ceramic discs on the front of the Wharenui show the different star constellations of the Maramataka, the 12 months of the Māori lunar calendar.

The collective brilliance of Te Rau Karamu Marae shows the mana and importance of this facility to Massey University and reminds us that creative genius also exists outside of the art gallery.

  • Rueben Friend is an artist, curator and writer and Kaihautū / Director of Poriruas Pātaka Art + Museum.


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All Blacks snubbed in the nominations for World Player of the Year https://maoriart.net/all-blacks-snubbed-in-the-nominations-for-world-player-of-the-year/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 22:02:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/all-blacks-snubbed-in-the-nominations-for-world-player-of-the-year/ Chris Hyde / Getty Images Will Jordan’s All Blacks goal scoring has nominated him landmark Player of the Year. The All Blacks were snubbed in the nominations for the World Rugby Player of the Year Award. It is the first time since 2004 that New Zealand has not shortlisted a player for the prestigious gong. […]]]>
Will Jordan's All Blacks goal scoring has nominated him landmark Player of the Year.

Chris Hyde / Getty Images

Will Jordan’s All Blacks goal scoring has nominated him landmark Player of the Year.

The All Blacks were snubbed in the nominations for the World Rugby Player of the Year Award.

It is the first time since 2004 that New Zealand has not shortlisted a player for the prestigious gong.

England and British & Irish Lions lock Maro Itoje, France’s halfback Antoine Dupont, Wallabie’s flanker and skipper Michael Hooper and the Australian center Samu Kerevi are the finalists.

SKY SPORTS

Fiji winger Eroni Sau was red carded against Wales for a head shot in the first half.

There are no springboks, although the world champions come out of hibernation to defeat the Lions and claim an exciting victory over the All Blacks.

CONTINUE READING:
* Super Rugby Pacific: Ian Foster reveals how All Blacks is handled
* All Blacks vs France: “It hurt. We were played out ”- Ian Foster urges Paris to respond
* All Blacks vs France: Anton Lienert-Brown out, Beauden Barrett doubtful for tour final

And since two Australians were nominated in one year, they were flashed three times by the All Blacks and only suffered losses against Scotland and England.

An All Black has been named Player of the Year ten times since its inception in 2001.

The All Blacks gain some relief in other categories with Ian Foster nominated for Coach of the Year and Will Jordan nominated for Breakthrough Player of the Year.

All Blacks boss Ian Foster has New Zealand opponents in the coach of the year category.

Will Russell / Getty Images

All Blacks boss Ian Foster has New Zealand opponents in the coach of the year category.

Foster faces competition for the coaching award from New Zealand sevens aces Allan Bunting and Cory Sweeney.

New Zealand’s presence is thin in other areas as well.

Veteran Scott Curry is nominated for Sevens Player of the Year, while Sarah Hirini is one of the four women’s sevens finalists.

Luke Jacobson’s landing for the All Blacks in September against Argentina is a finalist in Try of the Year.

The players in the Men and Women of the Year category are determined through a fan vote. The winners will be announced from December 7th, once the current international season in Europe is over.

NOMINATE WORLD RUGBY AWARDS 2021

Men’s 15th Player of the Year: Antoine Dupont (France), Michael Hooper (Australia), Maro Itoje (England / British and Irish Lions), Samu Kerevi (Australia).

15th Women’s Player of the Year: Zoe Aldcroft (England), Caroline Boujard (France), Poppy Cleall (England), Laure Sansus (France).

Breakthrough Player of the Year: Will Jordan (New Zealand), Andrew Kellaway (Australia), Louis Rees-Zammit (Wales), Marcus Smith (England).

Trainer of the year: Allan Bunting / Cory Sweeney (New Zealand Women Sevens), Ian Foster (New Zealand Men), Simon Middleton (England Women), Dave Rennie (Australia Men).

Seventh Men’s Player of the Year: Napolioni Bolaca (Fiji), Scott Curry (New Zealand), Marcos Moneta (Argentina), Jiuta Wainiqolo (Fiji).

Seventh player of the year: Anne-Cécile Ciofani (France), Sarah Hirini (New Zealand), Alowesi Nakoci (Fiji), Reapi Ulunisau (Fiji).

Men’s trial of the year: Lukhanyo Am (South Africa A, against British and Irish Lions on July 14th), Pierre-Louis Barassi (France, against Australia on July 17th), Luke Jacobson (New Zealand, against Argentina on September 12th), Damian Penaud (France, against Scotland on March 26th).

Women’s trial of the year: Sara Barattin (Italy, against Scotland on September 13th), Emilie Boulard (France, against Wales on April 3rd), Abby Dow (England, against France on April 30th), Romane Ménager (France, against Ireland on April 17th ).


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QAGOMA is preparing for the tenth chapter of the Asia Pacific Triennial Exhibition https://maoriart.net/qagoma-is-preparing-for-the-tenth-chapter-of-the-asia-pacific-triennial-exhibition/ https://maoriart.net/qagoma-is-preparing-for-the-tenth-chapter-of-the-asia-pacific-triennial-exhibition/#respond Thu, 11 Nov 2021 03:09:24 +0000 https://maoriart.net/qagoma-is-preparing-for-the-tenth-chapter-of-the-asia-pacific-triennial-exhibition/ Queensland Art Gallery | The Modern Art Gallery (QAGOMA) is being rebuilt in preparation for the tenth chapter of the Asia-Pacific Triennial for Contemporary Art (APT10 on December 4th). APT10 will have an extensive free exhibition at both gallery locations and will include a multi-strand cinema program, on-site and virtual events, seven artist projects for […]]]>

Queensland Art Gallery | The Modern Art Gallery (QAGOMA) is being rebuilt in preparation for the tenth chapter of the Asia-Pacific Triennial for Contemporary Art (APT10 on December 4th).

APT10 will have an extensive free exhibition at both gallery locations and will include a multi-strand cinema program, on-site and virtual events, seven artist projects for children and families, a two-day Up Late event in March 2022, and a full-color publication.

Queensland Art Secretary Leeanne Enoch comments, “This marks the tenth landmark time that QAGOMA has presented this bold and internationally acclaimed exhibition.

“For more than a quarter of a century, the Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art has presented some of the most exciting, inspiring and important works from Australia, Asia and the Pacific.

“Because of its geographic focus and intercultural awareness, the Asia-Pacific Triennial is unique among the recurring exhibitions of contemporary art that promote exceptional opportunities for cultural tourism and community development.”

Minister Enoch said that APT10 will showcase 69 projects from emerging and established artists and collectives from more than 30 countries and all summer through 25 will be an important contribution. The previous exhibition, APT9, drew 718,000 visitors, contributed nearly $ 35 million to the Queensland economy and generated more than 288,000 visitor nights.

“In a broader sense, the arts and culture sector contributes $ 8.5 billion to the state’s economy each year and supports more than 92,000 jobs for Queenslanders.”

Minister Enoch said exhibitions such as APT10 and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York’s recent European masterpieces, were made possible by blockbuster funding from the Queensland government to QAGOMA.

“The Met was the sixth most-visited ticket exhibition since QAGOMA opened and attracted more than 191,000 visitors,” said Minister Enoch.

“Our investment in blockbuster funding helps QAGOMA showcase exclusive exhibitions like APT10 to create jobs, promote cultural tourism and generate positive economic results, especially in the run-up to the 2032 Brisbane Olympic and Paralympic Games when our art and Cultural experiences on the world stage. “

Chris Saines, director of QAGOMA, said the tenth chapter of the gallery’s flagship franchise will also include “new and newly commissioned work that is rich in stories of travel, travel, migrations and connections to place.

“APT10 Kids continues the tradition of the gallery’s children’s art center, which invites artists to develop interactive offerings that encourage young visitors and families to explore the diverse cultures of the region and develop an understanding of contemporary art.

“Six of the interactive elements will also be presented in more than 100 regional and remote locations from December to April as part of APT10 Kids on Tour.”

APT 10 runs from December 4, 2021 to April 25, 2022. For more information, visit qagoma.qld.gov.au/whats-on/exhibitions/apt10

Related articles

July 28, 2019 – Asia-Pacific Contemporary Art Triennial Raises Millions for Brisbane Tourism

March 11, 2019 – Half a million visitors are drawn to the 9th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art in Brisbane

November 24, 2018 – The Queensland government opens the ninth Asia-Pacific Triennial for Contemporary Art

January 28, 2018 – QAGOMA reached a record two million visitors in 2017

September 7, 2017 – Marvel exhibition proves record success at QAGOMA

October 30, 2016 – QAGOMA and Singapore Art Museum sign long-term partnership

March 19, 2016 – QAGOMA welcomes 500,000 visitors to APT8

April 30, 2013 – The appointment marks a new era for QAGOMA


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Cattle beheading announces US tour in 2022 https://maoriart.net/cattle-beheading-announces-us-tour-in-2022/ https://maoriart.net/cattle-beheading-announces-us-tour-in-2022/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 17:28:21 +0000 https://maoriart.net/cattle-beheading-announces-us-tour-in-2022/ Cattle Decapitation are currently on a US tour in 2022 with The Last Ten Seconds of Life, Creeping Death and Extinction AD. announced The tour celebrates the return of Cattle Decap to the streets after two years of inactivity. The tour will also give the death metal legends the long-awaited opportunity to perform material from […]]]>

Cattle Decapitation are currently on a US tour in 2022 with The Last Ten Seconds of Life, Creeping Death and Extinction AD. announced

The tour celebrates the return of Cattle Decap to the streets after two years of inactivity. The tour will also give the death metal legends the long-awaited opportunity to perform material from their late 2019 album. Death atlasThey live for hordes of fans.

“We are thrilled to finally be able to announce a US tour after 2 years of inactivity in the USA due to the pandemic!” Rinder Decap write. “Our latest album and what we consider to be the best hour for the band in our entire 25-year history, DEATH ATLAS, is finally due in the states. Before things closed, we had our best live set we’ve ever done nailed down and played it in Australia, New Zealand and Japan, but we were cut off before we could get it to the States after they all digested them completely it was. Well, we are happy to say that from January 2022 we will take some time to do this album LIVE justice. “

They add, “We’re going to bring some bands whose names go well with the aesthetic of DEATH ATLAS including The Last Ten Seconds of Life, Creeping Death and Extinction AD! We ALL deserve whatever comes! DEATH … FINALLY! “

The tour begins January 18 in San Diego, California and traverses the states before ending in Mesa, Arizona on February 20. Ticket links will be available shortly. Keep an eye on the Cattle Decapitation website for more information.

See the full list of tour dates below.

Decapitation of Cattle / The Last Ten Seconds of Life / Creeping Death / Extinction AD 2022 Tour

Jan 18 – San Diego, California @ Brick By Brick
January 19 – Pomona, California @ The Glass House
Jan 20 – Los Angeles, California @ 1720
Jan 21 – Berkeley, California @ The Cornerstone *
Jan 22 – Reno, Nevada @ Cargo
Jan 24 – Portland, Oregon @ Hawthorne Theater *
January 25 – Seattle, Washington @ El Corazon *
Jan 27 – Salt Lake City, Utah @ Metro Music Hall *
Jan 28 – Colorado Springs, Colorado @ The Black Sheep
Jan 29 – Denver, Colorado @ The Oriental Theater *
Jan 31 – Belvidere, Illinois @ The Apollo AC
Feb. 01 – Minneapolis, Minn. @ Turf Club
February 02 – Joliet, Illinois @ The Forge
February 03 – Hobart, Ind. @ Hobart Art Theater
February 04 – Columbus, Ohio @ The Foundry
Feb 05 – Lexington, Kentucky @ Manchester Music Hall
February 06 – Detroit, Michigan @ The Shelter
February 08 – Worcester, Massachusetts @ Pallladium Upstairs
Feb 09 – New York, NY @ Le Poisson Rouge
Feb 11 – Atlanta, Georgia @ The Loft
February 12 – Tampa, Florida @ The Orpheum
Feb 14 – Houston, Texas @ Secret Group
February 15 – Dallas, Texas @ Amplified Live
February 16 – Austin, Texas @ Come And Take It Live
February 19 – Albuquerque, NM @Launchpad
February 20 – Mesa, Arizona @ Nile Theater
* = No creeping death

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15 artists associated with witchcraft, satanism, and the occult

Below is a gallery of 15 prominent artists from the rock and metal world who have been linked in one form or another to witchcraft, satanism, and the occult. Some may seem obvious and others may completely surprise you.


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