Art New Zealand – Maori Art http://maoriart.net/ Tue, 17 May 2022 18:47:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://maoriart.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Art New Zealand – Maori Art http://maoriart.net/ 32 32 Super Hero XLARGE Collab includes a recreation of Bulma’s new outfit https://maoriart.net/super-hero-xlarge-collab-includes-a-recreation-of-bulmas-new-outfit/ Tue, 17 May 2022 18:30:36 +0000 https://maoriart.net/super-hero-xlarge-collab-includes-a-recreation-of-bulmas-new-outfit/ New Dragon Ball Super: Superhero Merchandise comes thanks to a partnership with clothing brand XLARGE. According to Mantan Web, the capsule will include new t-shirts with images of Piccolo and Gohan. The clothing company is also reissuing several of its older shirts with Android 18, Trunks and a young Bulma. The shirts retail for 6,050 […]]]>

New Dragon Ball Super: Superhero Merchandise comes thanks to a partnership with clothing brand XLARGE.

According to Mantan Web, the capsule will include new t-shirts with images of Piccolo and Gohan. The clothing company is also reissuing several of its older shirts with Android 18, Trunks and a young Bulma. The shirts retail for 6,050 yen ($47) and each comes in three color options. While the shirts showcase teenage Bulma’s art, fans of her modern, redesigned outfit look on superhero can also purchase a replica of her new yellow jumpsuit for 16,500 yen (US$128). The items will be available exclusively on the California web store starting May 18th, followed by a wider release in XLARGE and X-Girls retail stores in Japan on May 21st.


RELATED: Dragon Ball Super: Goku Wears Saiyan Armor in New Manga Art

XLARGE is a streetwear brand founded in 1991. In addition to this new collection, the clothing company has collaborated with dragon ball several times in the past and has also produced collections based on other popular anime series including Inuyasha and death notice.

Set after the events of the Moro Arc, Dragon Ball Super: Superhero sees Earth threatened by the return of the Red Ribbon Army, who have built two new, deadly android warriors. The story will mainly focus on Piccolo, Gohan and their master-apprentice relationship. This relationship was recently highlighted in a promotional film for the film in which superhero‘s producers revealed some of the items that can be found in Piccolo’s house. One of those items is a plush toy of Penko, a penguin-cat hybrid mascot given to the antisocial, aloof green alien by Gohan and his family.


RELATED: Dragon Ball is giving fans a chance to win Piccolo’s cape

Other fan-favorite characters like Goten, Trunks, Pan, Android 18, Goku and (of course) Bulma will also appear in the film. A current preview for Superhero, which was published in Shueisha’s Saikyo jump Magazine revealed that Broly will also appear in the film and be involved in one of the film’s fights, although the preview didn’t reveal who his opponent is.

After a delay due to the toei animation hack, Dragon Ball Super: Superhero will premiere in theaters in Japan on June 11 and in North America, Latin America, Europe, Australia/New Zealand, Africa, the Middle East and other Asian countries later this summer. The different dragon ball Anime series, including Dragon Ball Z and Dragon Ball greatcan be streamed on Crunchyroll.


Source: Mantan Web, via Crunchyroll


Cell and Majin Buu

Will Dragon Ball ever provide canon stories between the Cell and the Buu Sagas?

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Purdon praises brilliant undefeated stallion https://maoriart.net/purdon-praises-brilliant-undefeated-stallion/ Mon, 16 May 2022 00:58:40 +0000 https://maoriart.net/purdon-praises-brilliant-undefeated-stallion/ Don’t stop dreaming (NZ) (luck of the weather) kept his unbeaten record intact as he led a field of trotting dominated by NZB Standardbred graduates and finished on Friday 13th Don’t stop dreaming (NZB Standardbred photo) Don’t Stop Dreaming recorded three wins from three starts, all at Group 2 level, as he swept past his […]]]>

Don’t stop dreaming (NZ) (luck of the weather) kept his unbeaten record intact as he led a field of trotting dominated by NZB Standardbred graduates and finished on Friday 13th

Don’t stop dreaming (NZB Standardbred photo)

Don’t Stop Dreaming recorded three wins from three starts, all at Group 2 level, as he swept past his rivals to win for trainers Mark Purdon and Hayden Cullen.

The classy colt was purchased by All Stars Racing Stables for $250,000 out of Studholme Bloodstock’s draft at the 2021 Christchurch National Yearling Sale by NZB Standardbred.

Don’t Stop Dreaming will be driven by clients Mark and Dennis Dunford and Ian Dobson of All Stars Racing Stables.

Champion Trainer Mark Purdon spoke enthusiastically about his undefeated Pacer after his third win at stakes level.

Purdon’s résumé was particularly impressive considering that during his illustrious trotting career he has prepared an incredible lineup of champions of all ages and gaits.

“He’s special, I think,” Purdon said. “He’s just a class, from the moment your arms are crossed there’s just this brilliance that sends tingles down your spine.”

The class of NZB Standardbred product was on full display as Don’t Stop Dreaming led a field full of National Yearling Sale buys.

Incredibly, the first six horses to pass the post and seven of the eight starters in the venerable feature, which dates back to 1943, are NZB Standardbred graduates.

The breeder-seller Studholme Bloodstock achieved an excellent result Definitive collection (NZ) (Arts Major) finishes second behind Don’t Stop Dreaming. Studholme Bloodstock also offered Final Collect at the 2021 Christchurch National Yearling Sale.

The two-year-old was an impressive winner in his debut for the Purdon-Cullen stable before finishing second on Friday night.

Vinke B (NZ) (Vincent) reinforced his fine debut third behind Don’t Stop Dreaming in the $60,000 Group Two Diamond Creek Farm Classic (2200m) with another strong performance for third place behind the undefeated stallion.

Vinke B was purchased from Rosedale Farm by All Stars Racing Stable at the 2021 Christchurch National Yearling Sale for $42,000.

OK Boomer (NZ) (Bettor’s Delight) placed fourth ahead of fellow NZB Standardbred graduates With Style (NZ) (Bettor’s Delight) (fifth place), Commander Ben (NZ) (Art Major) (sixth place) and Aroda ( NZ) (Art Major) (eighth place).

consignor Studholme Bloodstock
buyer All Stars Racing Stables
breed luck of the weather x Start dreaming
sale 2021 Christchurch Yearling Sale, $250,000
Bred by Studholme Bloodstock and MB Jefferies

by NZB Standardbred

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New Zealand says “Kia Ora” to its first voco hotel https://maoriart.net/new-zealand-says-kia-ora-to-its-first-voco-hotel/ Thu, 12 May 2022 17:23:16 +0000 https://maoriart.net/new-zealand-says-kia-ora-to-its-first-voco-hotel/ New Zealand today welcomed its first ownership of the voco brand with the highly anticipated launch of voco city center of Aucklanda brand new, state-of-the-art hotel in the heart of the City of Sails. A joint partnership between Pro-invest Hotels and IHG Hotels & Resorts, the start of voco city center of Auckland is the […]]]>

New Zealand today welcomed its first ownership of the voco brand with the highly anticipated launch of voco city center of Aucklanda brand new, state-of-the-art hotel in the heart of the City of Sails.

A joint partnership between Pro-invest Hotels and IHG Hotels & Resorts, the start of voco city center of Auckland is the voco brand’s first foray into New Zealand and signals the brand’s continued growth around the world.

With an ideal location in central Auckland on the corner of Albert Street and Wyndham Street, the new hotel is part of a twin tower complex, which also includes the 294 rooms Holiday Inn Express Auckland city center which is scheduled to open later this month.

Located right in the beating heart of Auckland, this vibrant, playful hotel blends premium essentials with indulgent touches to offer 201 spacious rooms and suites that reflect voco’s warm, signature style. Each stylishly appointed guest room and suite features premium, sustainable bedding with cocoon-like comfort, handpicked artwork, intelligent in-room technology, and stylish marble bathrooms with eco-conscious rain showers and Antipodes toiletries.

Designed by interior design firm Richards Stanisich, the new guest rooms and suites offer a serene place to relax, with a moody palette of deep blues and charcoal complemented by splashes of signature Voco yellow, warm wood tones with brass accents, and unique artwork.

The cozy Italian trattoria on the ground floor of the hotel, Mozzarella & Co serves an a la carte and breakfast buffet, as well as homemade pizzas and pasta for lunch and dinner, complemented by a boutique wine list, beers, and cocktails.

With the opening in mid-June, good times await at sky-high heights Bar Albert, voco’s rooftop destination, which is also New Zealand’s tallest rooftop bar. The glamorous Art Deco-inspired bar will feature an open terrace and atmospheric, sumptuous interiors, enticing guests to enjoy a drink inside or out.

The world-renowned Kiwi charm will be on full display thanks to the hotel’s Voco hosts, whose job is to welcome guests and attend to guests’ needs while each guest receives a carefully crafted Voco welcome gift that to give him a taste of the Auckland locale. Guests can step into a voco life voco city center of Auckland with communal areas, bars and lounges where you can meet, eat, drink and play anytime throughout the day.

Voko Auckland city center also makes it an ideal destination for conferences, meetings and events with five flexible meeting rooms available in addition to Bar Albert and Mozzarella & Co. providing additional space for more relaxed, social gatherings.

Specially designed to reduce the impact on the environment, voco city center of Auckland is aiming for a Level 3/Level 4 Green Engage certification by implementing a number of sustainable initiatives, such as the bathrooms, which reduce plastic waste by up to 80%.

Hotel website

voco city center of Auckland
Auckland CBD
Auckland, 1010
New Zealand

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How to make a bird https://maoriart.net/how-to-make-a-bird/ Tue, 10 May 2022 17:11:13 +0000 https://maoriart.net/how-to-make-a-bird/ Steve Braunias Steve Braunias is the editor of Newsroom’s books department, ReadingRoom, and is a featured writer at the NZ Herald. He has written 10 books including two published in 2021, Missing Persons (a true crime collection) and Cover Story (an illustrated tale of 100 weird, beautiful and disturbing New Zealand album covers). show more […]]]>

reading room

The writer dressed as a bird attends the Ockham Awards

brocade, chiffon and feathers, many of feathers – really the only topic that has been talked about in relation to the Ockham New Zealand National Book Awards 2022 in recent weeks is the costume that shortlisted writer Whiti Hereaka will be wearing at the awards ceremony, which is held today evening at the Q Theater in Auckland. She goes as wearable art. She goes as fiction. She stars as Kurangaituku, the title character of her novel, which was shortlisted for tonight’s $60,000 Jann Medlicott Acorn Prize for Fiction.

The novel is a retelling of the ancient myth, or Pūrākau, of Kurangaituku, the bird-woman of the island of Mokoia. Description, Te Ao Hau, 1965: “This woman had wings on her arms and claws instead of fingers. Her lips were long and hard and pointed, like a bird’s beak.” Or something like that; Whiti had her own vision of what Kurangaituku looked like when she wrote the book and has been working for the past few weeks to bring that vision to life in a spectacular costume that she will wear to the awards ceremony.

ReadingRoom has followed her outfit progress with regular updates every Friday as part of the Nielsen Best Sellers list. The author has posted photos of her costume to the Twitter machine via her @WHereaka account, helpfully tagged them #ockhamoutfit and given ReadingRoom permission to use them to illustrate the bestseller chart – Kurangaituku hovered around #3 and #4 for best-selling novel since the shortlist was announced on March 2nd.

That was also the date Whiti came to work. I called her last week and asked how the costume looked. “Almost finished. Almost done,” she said. “I will be clothed.”

Twitter Machines Update, April 15: “Grinding Bones To Make My Corset”

Are there tail feathers?

“Yes. I have this skirt that I made out of chiffon and it has shabby parts that look like feathers.

What kind of bird does she look like?

“In the book, I thought she looked a bit like a kotuku. Because this bird is so rare to see and it is also so impressive. So her face and wings are very kotuku even though she has a human/kotuku face, so her eyes are probably forward rather than sideways like a kotuku, and her torso is human too. Probably her thighs and legs would be back on Vogel, and I imagine she would have to be a bit stronger, like a kiwi with those strong forest feet.”

Does the outfit tell its own kind of narrative?

“Yes. I have these very long things on my elbows because I wanted to evoke the idea of ​​wings, but not too literally. Because I wanted to evoke the duality of the book cover itself. And so I used the same colors as the book covers – the outfit is almost like the book is spread out, so you have the red spine and the black and white of the cover.”

Twitter Machine Update April 5th: “I’ve finished my ruru/owl mask for my #ockhamoutfit! I glued feathers onto the mask (I had to trim some so I had tiny feathers around the eyes) and – of course – some down around the beak, just like a ruru!”

How did she create the mask?

“I found a pattern ages ago while looking for leather masks. I don’t know what I was looking for. I just thought, ‘That would be cool to do that one day.’ And then when the shortlist was announced I thought this might be my only chance to go to the Ockhams I’m not doing that now Maybe so why not celebrate by overdoing it a bit?

“I also think we need a little frivolity and fun. The last few years have been a bit bleak. I enjoy the process of making it and it’s an opportunity to have fun with the image.”

The result will walk – or fly – through the doors of the Q Theater tonight.

In the meantime Kurangaituku The novel is among 16 books shortlisted for the Ockhams to be offered all in one incredible prize draw exclusive to ReadingRoom. The closing date for entries is tonight, May 11, at 6 p.m.

ReadingRoom will publish the results of the winners sometime after 6pm with expert commentary.

Good luck to everyone who enters the prize draw; Best of luck, even more, to the authors, publishers, editors and everyone closely involved in the making of the 16 books competing for awards at the 2022 Ockham New Zealand National Book Awards. It’s a great achievement to even get this far. The rest is left to the whims and calculations of the judges. It is amazing how often they get it wrong and act like fools and botched idiots, but sometimes they are right and exercise considerable wisdom and taste; In any case, they can only do their best and their decision is final. The selection list is as follows; Congratulations to everyone who created these 16 excellent books.

BOOKSELLER AOTEAROA NEW ZEALAND AWARD FOR ILLUSTRATED CAUSE

Changing Reasons: Deep Stories by Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland by Lucy Mackintosh (Bridget Williams Books)

The Architect and Artists: Hackshaw, McCahon, Dibble by Bridget Hackshaw (Massey University Press)

Dressed: Fashionable dress in Aotearoa New Zealand 1840 to 1910 by Claire Regnault (Te Papa Press)

NUKU: Stories from 100 Indigenous Women by Qiane Matata-Sipu (QIANE+co)

JANN MEDLICOTT EICHEL PRIZE FOR FICTION

Kurangaituku by Whiti Hereaka (Huia Publishing)

Greta & Valdin by Rebecca K. Reilly (Te Herenga Waka University Press)

entanglement by Bryan Walpert (Mākaro Press)

Have a good winter by Gigi Fenster (text publisher)

GENERAL NON-FICTIONAL PRIZE

The mirror book by Charlotte Grimshaw (Penguin Random House)

Voices from the New Zealand Wars | He Reo nō ngā Pakanga o Aotearoa by Vincent O’Malley (Bridget Williams Books)

From the Center: A Writer’s Life by Patricia Grace (Penguin, Penguin Random House)

The Alarmist: Fifty Years of Measuring Climate Change by Dave Lowe (Te Herenga Waka University Press)

MARY AND PETER BIGGSY AWARD FOR POETRY

Rangikura by Tayi Tibble (Te Herenga Waka University Press)

The sea goes into a wall by Anne Kennedy (Auckland University Press)

sleeping with stones by Barford Series (Anahera Press)

fall by Joanna Preston (Otago University Press)

Twitter Machine Update, April 24th: “Yesterday I cut out my brocade waist cincher, but ouch! I’ve run out of needles heavy enough for this. So on to the rock. I designed this petticoat that has a godet at the back seam to make a bit of a tail shape (like a bird!)”

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Meteors and planets over New Zealand dazzle stargazers https://maoriart.net/meteors-and-planets-over-new-zealand-dazzle-stargazers/ Mon, 09 May 2022 00:09:49 +0000 https://maoriart.net/meteors-and-planets-over-new-zealand-dazzle-stargazers/ Stargazers from across Aotearoa have sent images to 1News, capturing the sights of falling meteors and glowing planets that lit up Sunday’s skies. The Eta Aquariid meteor shower framed by the glow of four planets. (Source: Josh Aoraki) From Waiheke Island to Takaka Bay, the Kiwis braved the early hours to witness the rare sight […]]]>

Stargazers from across Aotearoa have sent images to 1News, capturing the sights of falling meteors and glowing planets that lit up Sunday’s skies.

From Waiheke Island to Takaka Bay, the Kiwis braved the early hours to witness the rare sight of the Eta Aquariid meteor shower surrounded by glow from Saturn, Mars, Jupiter and Venus.

Among them, amateur photographers captured the spectacle.

From the shore of Waiti Bay, Auckland Stardome Astronomer Josh Aoraki used a long exposure to capture three hours of the night sky.

Continue reading: Sunday morning brings rare sights of planets and meteor showers

“There’s something pretty blinding about staring up at the sky at night as your eyes adjust to the darkness you’re beginning to see.”

“It’s very special, this mixture of orbital mechanics, science and art, the beauty of the universe… it was very fulfilling to watch.”

The Eta Aquariid meteors captured by an amateur photographer.

At the tip of the South Island, Shelley Grell sent 1News a photo of a star falling over Takaka Bay.

“I managed to catch a couple [of] Amateur photos of the four planets and some meteors (with maybe a satellite or two) between the clouds,” she wrote.

In Rotorua, Jessie Phillips provided a clear view of Saturn in the interval between shooting stars.

Glow from nearby planets illuminates Rotorua's night sky.

The annual sight is one of the most beautiful celestial events in the southern hemisphere.

Each May, Earth traverses the trail of dust and ice left by the Haley Comet, casting streaky glows as the comet’s debris ignites and falls through Earth’s atmosphere.

And while this year brought the stunning sights of four distant planets to the spectacle, Josh Aroraki says it’s all in preparation for something even rarer next June.

“Basically all the planets you can see with the naked eye will be visible at the same time.”

He says that Saturn, Mars, Venus and Jupiter have drawn closer together since March and will be joined by Venus next month.

“Four planetary alignments are pretty rare, but getting those five, including the time of Matariki, is going to be pretty special.”

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“I want to be a LEGO MASTER” – The Gisborne Herald https://maoriart.net/i-want-to-be-a-lego-master-the-gisborne-herald/ Sat, 07 May 2022 00:39:16 +0000 https://maoriart.net/i-want-to-be-a-lego-master-the-gisborne-herald/ Posted May 07, 2022 at 12:37 p.m ‘Taken from the brick’. Brick by brick, Gisborne’s own Jonathan Samson has been built for tomorrow night when he hits the TV screen for Lego Masters NZ. Jono and his Brick pal Dan Mulholland from Upper Hutt will put their imaginations and building skills to the test against […]]]>

Posted May 07, 2022 at 12:37 p.m

‘Taken from the brick’.

Brick by brick, Gisborne’s own Jonathan Samson has been built for tomorrow night when he hits the TV screen for Lego Masters NZ.

Jono and his Brick pal Dan Mulholland from Upper Hutt will put their imaginations and building skills to the test against five other teams in New Zealand‘s first televised Lego ‘Brick-Off’.

“When I saw the overseas shows, I always wished it would come to Aotearoa. And when it happened, it was a piece of cake. i had to play

“I want to be a Lego master,” Jono said, not giving anything away when it comes to what’s happening on the show.

Jono is a super Lego fan.

“When I was very young I made the mistake of biting a lego piece off another lego piece and ended up swallowing it,” Jono said.

“I think it sucked into me and I was taken over by the brick.”

Growing up with three younger sisters, Jono was Lego as he got away as his siblings all loved tap dancing.

“Part of my escape was going into my Lego room and doing whatever I wanted. I built Lego until I was told I was too old for Lego – like 16 or 17. I stopped playing a long time ago.”

When Jono turned 30, he figured it was time to get back on the blocks.

“I realized I was big enough and ugly enough to decide if I was old enough to still play Lego.

“I saw this really cool dinosaur helicopter set and I was like, ‘How can I resist?'”

His hobby became serious in 2014 when professionals in the industry took notice.

After the death of his train driver father, Bob, Jono decided to commemorate his father in bricks.

“When I was a kid we used to ride up and down the train tracks along the coast. There was a piece of the gorge it used to go through. There was the terrain, the train, the tracks and the water, and I just wanted to capture it in Lego.”

When Jono was building the piece in 2014, he received a call from Toyworld in Napier – his closest Lego retailer – who was having a Lego tag.

“I had revolving laybuys there.”

The event featured a who’s who of the Lego world, including Australian Ryan “The Brickman” McNaught – one of only 21 Lego Certified professionals worldwide.

Jono decided to take his canyon and train piece to the show and received a fantastic response. Hundreds of people admired his work and even The Brickman himself was impressed.

A few years later, Jono’s future Lego Masters teammate Dan started a Lego show in Hawke’s Bay. The couple bonded and a friendship blossomed.

Jono and Dan have both had mental health struggles and Lego has acted as therapy – something Jono is keen to share with others.

When Jono saw TVNZ on social media calling for applications to join Lego Masters NZ, he immediately messaged Dan and the dynamic brick building duo was born.

“When I went to Lego Masters, I was a middle-aged guy playing with a kid’s toy,” Jono said. “Coming back I felt like a Lego artist.”

“It’s very affirming as an art form, as an outlet for expression and mindfulness. It keeps me creative and creating the life I want.

Jono said the experience was a privilege and he couldn’t wait to see the looks on his three children’s faces when they watched the show.

“My kids these days just look at screens, so now I can reach them through a mechanism they understand . . . Maybe I can throw in some life lessons they can learn along the way.”

Lego Masters New Zealand will be shown on TVNZ 2 from Monday at 7.30pm

Jono Samson attributes his obsession with Lego to swallowing a piece of the plastic bricks as a child. The Gisborne man takes his passion to a new level in the first Lego Masters NZ TV series from Monday. He is pictured with an exclusive mini ‘LM’ set given to him after attending the show. There are only 500 of them worldwide. Pictures by Liam Clayton

A smart brick Tui.

BRICKS CAN FLY: Lego Masters NZ contender Jono Samson has started a bird series where he creates native birds like the fantail and tui and then sells them online. Pictures by Liam Clayton

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Everyone is welcome: Tahitian dancers sharing the art of Ori Tahiti https://maoriart.net/everyone-is-welcome-tahitian-dancers-sharing-the-art-of-ori-tahiti/ Thu, 05 May 2022 05:19:46 +0000 https://maoriart.net/everyone-is-welcome-tahitian-dancers-sharing-the-art-of-ori-tahiti/ Day-j Mahana Gemmel and Taina McClutchie bring Tahitian dance to Flaxmere. A Tahitian dance class, run out of the Flaxmere Community Center, brings together people from all backgrounds looking for something new to try. Raised in Tahiti, French Polynesian Day-j Mahana Gemmell was introduced to Tahitian dance at a young age. After living in Hastings […]]]>

Day-j Mahana Gemmel and Taina McClutchie bring Tahitian dance to Flaxmere.

A Tahitian dance class, run out of the Flaxmere Community Center, brings together people from all backgrounds looking for something new to try.

Raised in Tahiti, French Polynesian Day-j Mahana Gemmell was introduced to Tahitian dance at a young age.

After living in Hastings for almost two and a half years, the 27-year-old mother of one wanted to share her cultural dancing with her new community.

“In Tahiti, children are exposed to Tahitian dance, or Ori Tahiti, from a young age,” Day-j said.

Day-j took Ori Tahiti classes from the age of 5 but said she didn’t really like it until she was in her mid-teens.

“I’ve always wanted to share my love and passion for the Ori Tahiti ever since my husband and I left Hawaii for New Zealand.”

She just wasn’t sure how to go about it until her good friend Taina McClutchie approached the Flaxmere Community Center with the idea of ​​a dance class.

The community center loved the idea – the Hastings community hadn’t planned dance classes like Day-j and Taina – so the two friends decided to share their Tahitian dance skills with their community.

Trained by experts, Taina performed in Hawaii for four years.

More than 15 people came to a free 1-hour Tahitian dance class to learn something new and have fun.  Photo / Warren Buckland
More than 15 people came to a free 1-hour Tahitian dance class to learn something new and have fun. Photo / Warren Buckland

At first they started the course purely for fun because they missed dancing in New Zealand.

“We thought it would be good to give it a try, share our love and passion for the Ori Tahiti and see if people want to join us and learn or just have fun,” said Day-j.

“And why not try something new and different every now and then?”

Taina has done a lot of work taking the initiative to book the space and speak to the community center officials.

Day-j joked that she only contributed by showing up.

She also prepares the lessons with the music, the steps, the routine, the energy and everything else necessary.

All ages are welcome. The two teachers just want everyone to feel the same love and energy that they feel sharing the dances. “We want everyone to try,” says Day-J.

The Ori-Tahiti class has left the Flaxmere Community Center in the last four weeks and has been in the works since February this year.

An average of 15 people have attended the Tahitian dance class every Wednesday for the past two weeks.

“We were amazed and happy to have about 15 people this week; we didn’t expect so many,” said Day-j.

Regardless of your ethnicity, age, size or shape, everyone is welcome at the free Tahitian dance classes, led by two members of the Hastings community, originally from Tahitian.  Photo / Warren Buckland
Regardless of your ethnicity, age, size or shape, everyone is welcome at the free Tahitian dance classes, led by two members of the Hastings community, originally from Tahitian. Photo / Warren Buckland

“Honestly, we would have loved to have one or two people around because we just wanted to have fun.”

Day-j expected the class to get bigger over time, but said she doesn’t expect “so many so soon.”

You don’t need much to attend the class, just a “pareo or lavalava, water, a smile, fun and an amazing attitude, but most of all, be ready to sweat and laugh”.

Tuition is free; However, the instructors will accept a small koha if you wish to donate in recognition of their time and hard work.

Day-j said, “Seeing the community having fun together, sweating, laughing and pushing each other together helps us, Taina and I break down stereotypes about dancing as teachers and sharing.”

Ori Tahiti Tahiti Dance: Every Wednesday from 5:00pm to 6:00pm at the Flax Rock Community Centre.

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KiwiWeek unites RPG fans in New Zealand and around the world https://maoriart.net/kiwiweek-unites-rpg-fans-in-new-zealand-and-around-the-world/ Mon, 02 May 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/kiwiweek-unites-rpg-fans-in-new-zealand-and-around-the-world/ picture: KiwiWeek Sunday May 1st saw the start of New Zealand‘s first KiwiWeek celebration, dubbed Kēmu Whakatau O Aotearoa. Aims to spread awareness of Kiwi games and designers, organizers created a stacked schedule of events for the week, including game releasesactual game live streamsPanels at the Big Bad Con and bundles up DriveThruRPG and juck.io. […]]]>

Image for article titled KiwiWeek unites RPG fans in New Zealand and around the world

picture: KiwiWeek

Sunday May 1st saw the start of New Zealand‘s first KiwiWeek celebration, dubbed Kēmu Whakatau O Aotearoa. Aims to spread awareness of Kiwi games and designers, organizers created a stacked schedule of events for the week, including game releasesactual game live streamsPanels at the Big Bad Con and bundles up DriveThruRPG and juck.io.

“Aotearoa New Zealand has developed a vibrant and exciting community of gamers and game designers. We don’t make it to GenCon or Dragonmeet or the JoCo Cruise that easily,” Morgan Davie, a game designer and podcaster from Te Whanganui-a-Tara, Wellington, shared with io9 via email. “But we believe that our games and gamers have a fresh and unique energy that everyone can enjoy.” Even though you might not know it, games like monsters of the week and The spread are both written by New Zealanders.

io9 was able to chat with some of the designers and attendees involved in KiwiWeek including Liam Stevens (who describes himself as Kaitiaki, a steward or maintainer who is part of the community responsible for KiwiRPG) and Brendon Bennett’s. “The community belongs to all of us, and the [forum] to the community. No head stands above the other here.” Stevens too who runs it Toa table top podcast, told us. Stevens constantly stressed the importance of community in KiwiRPG. “Te Ao puts the Māori community first, so I felt it was important that we build a community that is self-sustaining and less dependent on foreign parties supporting Kiwi individuals.” he added.

Liz Parker, a Waipā-based podcaster, said in a press release provided to io9 that “Aotearoa’s history of creative industries makes our small size our greatest strength because it’s easy to share knowledge, work quickly, and try new things with the community behind you. We’ve seen it in film, television, and video games, and now in tabletop RPGs.”

“We’re an extremely social culture that puts the community and the group before the self and that fits well with a hobby like RPGs that is inherently social,” Stevens added. As a Māori creator, Stevens wants to help bring other local, indigenous voices to the forefront of design. “By creating a community that is uniquely based in Aotearoa, it would send a signal to other Māori in the hobby that their voices are wanted. We’re few and far between in this hobby, especially design, so I want to give the shout out and see who we can welcome.”

Bennett agreed. “As a community, I am amazed at how generous everyone is with support and collaboration. If I get stuck with a bit of adventure design, I know there are a dozen experienced GMs out there who are happy to give me advice.”

“The theater of the absurd is true to our art,” Stevens said about the kind of Kiwi culture we can expect from Kēmu Whakatau O Aotearoa, “and RPGs are no different.”

Image for article titled KiwiWeek unites RPG fans in New Zealand and around the world

picture: KiwiWeek

“It’s difficult to make generalizations [about Kiwi gameplay culture]” remarked Bennetts. “BBut I think Kiwis have a keen sense of humor that shows when we play games: the dead serious can sit right next to the very stupid, followed by unexpected moments of poignancy.”

“Everything is ironic and self-deprecating. This extends to our culture, which shys away a little culturally from attempts to be taken seriously. However, we shake this and find our voice much better,” Stevens added. When asked what he hopes international audiences will benefit from, Stevens expressed a desire for people to see and appreciate the breadth of talent that exists in Aotearoa and “from a Māori lens, love it that way many international creators to incorporate Māori cultural tropes into their own games, maybe now they can see how we actually make things ourselves.”

“There is a Māori proverb that goes ‘Kāore te kūmara e kōrero mō tōna ake reka’, meaning ‘the kūmara (sweet potato) does not speak of its own sweetness.'” Bennetts who is also the DM of Dungeon & Comedians(which will have a live stream on May 8th). Kiwis tend to be so humble that they refuse to advertise themselves even when they have something amazing on their hands. Kēmu Whakatau O Aotearoa is an opportunity for us to talk about the amazing things each other is doing.”

“TTRPGs are getting bigger and bigger all the time… I think what’s really growing is the acceptance of other TTRPGs beyond that D&D. For example, I know a lot of people who play monsters of the week (especially after playing on it The Adventure Zone), but don’t even realize the game was made here in Aotearoa by Mike Sands of Generic Games.”

io9 asked Stevens about the state of contemporary game design and asked him to pick a few favorites to share. “It’s very difficult, like choosing between children,” he joked.I think Greg Stafford was a serious contender for greatest game designer of all time. This man was a darling. When it comes to contemporary designers, the two I’m most excited about are the following Pam Punzalan and Zedeck Siew. As for games, I keep coming back to this mothership and Mork Borg. You just talk to me.”

bennetts was more specific and choose games by Aotearoa. “I have a real soft spot for Steve Hickey’s game sun. It’s sort of the reverse of the usual Lovecraftian-influenced games, where you play a group of small-town cultists trying to summon a dark god. The audio is dark but (at least when I play it) it turns into a hilarious chaotic mess like something off breaking Bad,” he said. “I would also like to mention Morgan Davies’ new game Paranormal Wellingtonthat captures the deadpan humor of perfect Wellington Paranormal (as the title suggests). If you’re familiar with both Powered by the Apocalypse games and Kiwi idioms, then a 7-9 roll that’s a ‘Yeah, Ne’ result is extremely satisfying.”

Stevens helped design the event’s name, Kēmu Whakatau O Aotearoa, which honors the Māori Te Reo (language) and gaming culture at the heart of the Kiwi sensibility. “Te Ao Māori and RPGs integrate very well. We are a storytelling culture, our traditions are oral, and we use metaphor and story to teach lessons and explore philosophy,” he explained. “It’s something we get deeply involved with from a young age, so RPGs feel natural as we’re primed from a young age to examine problems through the lens of history and others.”


You can browse either of the Tag #KiwiWeek over to itch.io to find some great games, or you can read the bundle over at DriveThruRPG. Here are some popular games from Aotearoa:


Want more io9 news? Check out when to expect the latest Wonder and war of stars What’s next for the releases DC Universe in Film and TVand everything you need to know about it house of the dragon and Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power.

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New York-based Irish designer Clodagh ‘can’t stand the word trend’ https://maoriart.net/new-york-based-irish-designer-clodagh-cant-stand-the-word-trend/ Sun, 01 May 2022 05:00:36 +0000 https://maoriart.net/new-york-based-irish-designer-clodagh-cant-stand-the-word-trend/ “It’s important that your house takes care of you, not that you take care of your house,” says the New York-based Irish designer, known simply as Clodagh. The Sligo-born interior designer, who has projects in 24 countries, has a design philosophy of ‘making people happy and comfortable around them’. “I try to take the frustrations […]]]>

“It’s important that your house takes care of you, not that you take care of your house,” says the New York-based Irish designer, known simply as Clodagh. The Sligo-born interior designer, who has projects in 24 countries, has a design philosophy of ‘making people happy and comfortable around them’.

“I try to take the frustrations out of people’s lives. The best part about being a designer is when clients call you and tell you their lives have changed and family relationships have gotten better thanks to our work,” she says.

The Manhattan studio Clodagh Design employs approximately 20 people and has a portfolio ranging from homes to hotels, spas, restaurants, shops, offices, luxury yachts and private jets. Clodagh has worked for clients such as Robert Redford and Elizabeth Arden, completing projects including the Dupont Circle Hotel in Washington DC, the luxury high-rise residential buildings in Caledonia in New York, the Avery Building in San Francisco and the Six Senses Douro Valley Spa in Portugal.

In Ireland she has designed a home on Dalkey’s Sorrento Terrace, the White Horses Spa at the Trump International Hotel and Golf Links in Doonbeg, Co Clare and a converted cowshed cottage for her son Tim O’Kennedy in Co Cork.

The Clodagh collection includes bespoke pieces used in design projects, but her studio has also developed ranges of outdoor furniture, rugs, fabrics, wall coverings, bathroom accessories and small sculptural objects. An early adopter of feng shui principles of celebrating the senses and representing all elements (earth, fire, wood, metal and water) in design, she describes herself as an environmentalist and has been vegan since the 1980s.

“I like sturdy and strong, sexy and tactile – things that last and don’t dance up and down for attention. I can’t stand the word trend,” she explains in a new documentary for RTÉ. Directed by Oda O’Carroll and produced by A Curious Dog Films Production, the program is a compelling look back at Clodagh’s colorful life, remarkable career and extraordinary work ethic.

Baptized Clodagh Fionnuala Maev De Sillery Phipps, she was raised as the third child of John Peddar Phipps and Anna Claire De Sillery Phipps in five different homes, including the Oscar Wilde family’s summer home in Cong, Co. Mayo and the home of WB Yeats’ uncle. She describes her family as “downward mobile” and sold the family silver so her children could attend boarding schools.

Recovering from a life-threatening fall from a horse on her flat back as a teenager, Clodagh decided to become a fashion designer when she noticed an advertisement for the Grafton Academy of Fashion Design while reading The Irish Times. Although her father disapproved of her career choice, her mother loaned her £400 to start her.

After completing the course, Clodagh set up her studio first on Dublin’s South Anne Street and later on Baggot Street and had her first fashion show at the Hibernian Hotel in 1956. With her Clodagh of Dublin brand, she became the youngest member of the Iren Haute Couture Group alongside Ib Jorgensen, Sybil Connolly, Neillí Mulcahy and Irene Gilbert.

Clodagh at the age of 18 at her first fashion show in 1956

In the late 1950s and 1960s, her meteoric rise as a young Irish fashion designer in Irish tweed, knitwear and crochet, exporting to Australia, New Zealand, the United States, France and Germany, paralleled her marriage to advertising executive Desmond O ‘ Kennedy and the birth of their three children, Tim, Stephen and Peter. By the time she was 27, she realized she was not happy in her marriage and because divorce was not an option in Ireland, she had to live with her husband for the next five years while awaiting a legal separation.

In 1971, a chance meeting with screenwriter Daniel Aubry in the glitzy city of Mojácar, Spain, sparked a relationship that would last more than 50 years. The couple first relocated to New York, where Clodagh worked as a fashion designer for a time, and their children visited them during the holidays while they attended school in Ireland.

Aubry then moved into real estate in Spain, where Clodagh began her career as an interior designer. In the documentary, she describes watching the sunlight seep through the dust as demolition of her new home began, as the moment she found her true calling. Living in Spain for the next seven years, she designed restaurants, pubs, apartments and houses.

When the couple returned to New York in the early 1980s, she and two colleagues opened the East Village design studio and small design shop, Clodagh, Ross and Williams. Vogue magazine described it as the “design store of the decade”.

Over the years, Clodagh has become one of America’s most accomplished interior designers with a wealth of accolades, including induction into Interior Design Magazine’s Design Hall of Fame. She was also named one of the top 100 designers in the world by Architectural Digest.

Now at the age of 82, she still works 11 hours a day in her design studio. Her husband Daniel Aubry describes her as a “force of nature”. Her youngest son, Peter O’Kennedy, who lives two doors down in New York with his family, is now artistic director of Clodagh Designs.

She has written three books on interior design, Total Design (2001), Your Home, Your Sanctuary (2008) and Life-Enhancing Design (2019).

“It’s important that your house takes care of you, not that you take care of your house.” Photo: Robert Wright

The four C’s

Speaking to The Irish Times via Zoom from her New York studio, she reiterates her four Cs as a starting point for designing your space. “Think about where you are now and where you want to go. Clean: Declutter mentally and physically (break the dread of antiques and old things you grew up with). Clarify: Make three lists—your must-haves, your wannabe nice ones, and something awesome (your wish list). And then: create,” she explains.

It’s there to get people jumping straight onto their wish list by putting a fountain in the hallway or buying something that really enriches their lives, like a beautiful piece of art or a particularly good TV or sound system.

Her passion for art, music, films, travel and cooking empowers her, she says, as does her personal tragedy (her middle son Steve died aged 23) and her own near-death experiences (a fall at a construction site in Portugal and some scary flights ) grounded them. “I’ve had some serious accidents that make you realize that life is beautiful and don’t dwell on the absurd,” she says.

Her commitment to the Thorn Tree project, which promotes the education of children from the nomadic Samburu tribe in north-eastern Kenya, is also very important to her.

An early interest in Buddhism has developed into a lifelong interest in astrology, minimalism and incorporating nature into design. She believes clutter can undermine serenity, but minimalism shouldn’t be self-denying. She asks everyone she meets what their zodiac sign is.

Sustainability is also a priority. “We have a ‘give-away’ bin at home for things we don’t use. Accumulation is dangerous. I like giving gifts every day,” she says.

Clodagh, a documentary about the life of the pioneering Irish designer, airs on RTÉ One on Thursday 5 May at 10.15pm

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Mural serves as a reminder to take care of our Awa and brings life to the gray room https://maoriart.net/mural-serves-as-a-reminder-to-take-care-of-our-awa-and-brings-life-to-the-gray-room/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/mural-serves-as-a-reminder-to-take-care-of-our-awa-and-brings-life-to-the-gray-room/ Nelson’s latest giant mural has turned an unlikely place into a place of beauty – the hidden gem. Artist Sean Duffell (Ngāti Porou) and his collaborators Thijs de Koning and Chris Zesk spent five days over Easter installing the work at the Nelson Waste Recovery Centre, which was inspired by the Brook Waimārama Sanctuary. The […]]]>

Nelson’s latest giant mural has turned an unlikely place into a place of beauty – the hidden gem.

Artist Sean Duffell (Ngāti Porou) and his collaborators Thijs de Koning and Chris Zesk spent five days over Easter installing the work at the Nelson Waste Recovery Centre, which was inspired by the Brook Waimārama Sanctuary.

The mural depicts tuna/longfin eel, īnanga/whitebait fish, kokopu and kōura/crabs, and titiwai/fireflies glittering at either end of the 60-meter-long wall.

Duffell said the work is a “reminder of the fragile ecosystem that’s right outside our back door.”

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Artists Sean Duffell (left), Thijs de Koning and Chris Zesk completed a mural depicting Nelson's aquatic life over Easter.

Artists Sean Duffell (left), Thijs de Koning and Chris Zesk completed a mural depicting Nelson’s aquatic life over Easter.

The broader message that unfolds across the mural, he said, is “to become more aware of our footprints as human beings.”

The design is influenced by the flow and colors of the Maitahi awa, said Duffell, who is based in Te Waiharakeke/Blenheim.

“Concern for the Haora/health of our Whenua/land, Awa/rivers and Te Moana/oceans are important elements in the visual story played out across the mural,” he said.

The $30,000 mural was funded from Nelson City Council’s annual arts budget and from the NCC’s Solid Waste account, the latter being self-funded from sources such as landfill waste.

The mural depicts Nelson's aquatic wildlife at the Nelson Waste Recovery Center in Tāhunanui.

MARTIN DE RUYTER/MATERIALS

The mural depicts Nelson’s aquatic wildlife at the Nelson Waste Recovery Center in Tāhunanui.

Duffell, Koning and Zesk won the artwork tender from a pool of over 20 entries in February.

NCC Community and Recreation Chair Tim Skinner said the mural brought life to an otherwise gray area.

“Inspirational public art like this has the power to lift spirits and make people feel that Whakatū Nelson is a place worth living and worth visiting.”

NCC Infrastructure chairman Brian McGurk said the artwork is a “visual reminder of the responsibility we all have to keep our beautiful Maitahi full of life.”

Responsible waste disposal and management, and recycling where possible, helped improve air and water quality, he said.

“We can talk about these important things whenever possible, but sometimes an image can do the job a thousand times more effectively.”

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