Art New Zealand – Maori Art http://maoriart.net/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 02:29:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://maoriart.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Art New Zealand – Maori Art http://maoriart.net/ 32 32 Moonchild travel to Australia in November https://maoriart.net/moonchild-travel-to-australia-in-november/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 02:29:50 +0000 https://maoriart.net/moonchild-travel-to-australia-in-november/ After their first Australasian dates in June 2020 were canceled due to the pandemic, the Californian trio will finally bring their fusion of alternative R&B, jazz and neo-soul to Australia. LA-based neo-soul trio Moonchild today announced dates for Australia and New Zealand for November this year as part of an extensive world tour in support […]]]>

After their first Australasian dates in June 2020 were canceled due to the pandemic, the Californian trio will finally bring their fusion of alternative R&B, jazz and neo-soul to Australia.

LA-based neo-soul trio Moonchild today announced dates for Australia and New Zealand for November this year as part of an extensive world tour in support of their latest album star fruit. Their tour of Australia and New Zealand will see them hit Auckland’s Tuning Fork on November 15th, Melbourne’s Night Cat on November 16th and Sydney’s Oxford Art Factory on November 17th.

moon child Tour of Australia and New Zealand

  • 15 November – The Tuning Fork, Auckland
  • November 16 – The Night Cat, Melbourne
  • 17 November – Oxford Art Factory, Sydney

Check out Melbourne’s most comprehensive gig guide here.

A combination of three multi-instrumentalists – Amber Navran, Andris Mattson and Max Bryk – Moonchild has collaborated with the likes of Kamasi Washington, Stevie Wonder, The Internet and Jill Scott. Their ever-evolving fusion of alternative R&B and neo-soul has been compared to the likes of Tom Misch and Jordan Rakei, and the band received widespread acclaim following the release of their 2019 album little ghost and the resulting NPR Tiny Desk Session, which has racked up over 4 million views.

Moonchild’s latest record star fruit features collaborations from Lalah Hathaway, Rapsody, Tank and The Bangas, Alex Isley, Ill Camille, Mumu Fresh, Chantae Cann and Josh Johnson. In addition to the extensive list of featured artists, Moonchild is experimenting with new synths and sounds. While these textures and tonal palettes are still rooted in their trademarks, they rise star fruit onto new and impressive musical terrain from Moonchild.

Ticket sales start on September 30th. Full tour and ticket information can be found here.

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50 things to do in Vancouver this week, September 26-30 https://maoriart.net/50-things-to-do-in-vancouver-this-week-september-26-30/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 18:40:36 +0000 https://maoriart.net/50-things-to-do-in-vancouver-this-week-september-26-30/ MONDAY: Indigenous short film screenings Vancouver Public Library will feature the work of Haida artists Bill Reid and Robert Davidson, new animations by emerging creatives, and documentary work by Indigenous filmmakers and activists. MONDAY: The Swiss avant-garde metal band Zeal & Ardor plays the Rickshaw Theater. Without an invitation Exhibitions at the Vancouver Art Gallery. […]]]>

MONDAY: Indigenous short film screenings Vancouver Public Library will feature the work of Haida artists Bill Reid and Robert Davidson, new animations by emerging creatives, and documentary work by Indigenous filmmakers and activists.

MONDAY: The Swiss avant-garde metal band Zeal & Ardor plays the Rickshaw Theater.

Without an invitation Exhibitions at the Vancouver Art Gallery.

MONDAY TO FRIDAY: Uninvited: Canadian Women Artists in the Modern Moment brings together more than 200 works of art by a generation of painters, photographers, weavers, beadworkers and sculptors. Running until January 8, 2023 in Art Gallery Vancouver.

MONDAY TO FRIDAY: New T. rex: The Ultimate Predator exhibit unveils the story of the world’s most famous dinosaur through life-size models, fossil casts and engaging interactive elements. The exhibition runs until January 22, 2023 world of science.

MONDAY TO FRIDAY: in collaboration with the Winnipeg Art Gallery, the Vancouver Museum presents the traveling exhibition Pensioner X until October.

MONDAY TO FRIDAY: An exhibition on indigenous cultural practices runs at the community center until October 1 Roundhouse Community Arts and Recreation Center.

TUESDAY: a night of heavy metal and rock ‘n’ roll at WISE hall With hellfire from San Francisco, screamer from Sweden and maid from Canada.

TUESDAY: San Francisco doom metal band Om plays the Rickshaw Theater.

Madison Cunningham plays the Biltmore Cabaret.
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TUESDAY: California folk-rock singer-songwriter Madison Cunningham plays the Biltmore Cabaret.

TUESDAY TO FRIDAY: That Arts Club Theater Company presents the international comedy sensation Peter Pan goes wrongIn the Level of the Stanley Industrial Alliance until October 16th.

TUESDAY TO WEDNESDAY: Night Pieces and Other Works is an exhibition of paintings by David A Haughton to see at Gallery of visual space until 28.09.

TUESDAY TO FRIDAY: Elementary Cinema brings together the joint film works by Denise Ferreira da Silva and Arjuna Neuman, which will be shown until November 11th Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery.

TUESDAY TO FRIDAY: shows at the UBC Museum of Anthropology until January 1st Xicanx: Dreamers + Changemakers / Soñadores + creadores del cambioshowcasing the rich traditions of 33 Xicanx artists.

TUESDAY TO FRIDAY: We were so far away is a traveling exhibition Vancouver Maritime Museum through November 27, which uses first-person stories and archival imagery to tell stories about the Inuit boarding school experience.

TUESDAY TO FRIDAY: the West Van Arts Council the gifts Introspections + Expressionsan exhibition of artworks by Sue Daniel and Paula DiMarcoIn the Kay Meek Arts Center until October 21st.

Chvrches plays the Queen E. Theater.

WEDNESDAY: Scottish synthpop trio Chvrches plays the Queen Elizabeth Theater.

WEDNESDAY: R&B artist Emily Chambers performs mom is the word on Commercial Drive.

WEDNESDAY:Chicago indie rock trio Dehd plays the Rickshaw Theaterwith guest EXUM.

WEDNESDAY: New Zealand alt-country/folk singer-songwriter Marlon Williams performs the Hollywood Theater.

The 3 rooms of melancholy Screens in the cinematheque.

WEDNESDAY: DIM cinema presents a demonstration the cinematheque by Finnish director Pirjo Honkasalo The 3 rooms of melancholy.

WEDNESDAY TO FRIDAY: the Bill Reid Gallery presents the exhibition True to place: stímetstexw tel xéltelwhich, through March 19, 2023, is examining the work of 10 Northwest Coast Indigenous artists.

WEDNESDAY TO FRIDAY: Inspired by the global political unrest of 2011, StanDouglas the gifts 2011 ≠ 1848four large-format photographs and a two-channel video installation, on view until November 6th at Polygon Gallery.

WEDNESDAY TO FRIDAY: Artist born in the Dominican Republic Tania Marmolejos first solo exhibition in Canada, The dream and the journey, runs until October 1st Center for international contemporary art.

WEDNESDAY TO FRIDAY: Performances in York theatre to October 8 from Hot Brown Honey: The Remixin which a group of World First Nations women shatter stereotypes to celebrate people’s similarities and differences.

frozen river is running at the Waterfront Theatre.
LEIF NORMAN, COURTESY OF MANITOBA THEATER FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

WEDNESDAY TO FRIDAY: Carousel theater for young people presents the West Coast premiere at the Waterfront Theater from Frozen River (nîkwatin sîpiy), a piece about reconciliation, environmental protection and solidarity.

THURSDAY: Opening night of the 41st annual Vancouver International Film Festival, which runs through October 29 with screenings of over 130 feature films and 100 short films at various venues in Vancouver.

THURSDAY: writer Joseph Kakvinokanasum introduces his new book My Indian Summer at Massy Arts Society.

THURSDAY: Indigenous drum, dance and song duo Chubby Cree with a 12 year old Noah Green and his grandmother Carol Pulverplays Surrey Town Hall.

THURSDAY: London-based jazz psych rock band The Comet is Coming play the Rickshaw Theater.

THURSDAY: the Vancouver Symphony plays orchestral excerpts from Carmen, the most popular work by the French composer Bizet Orpheum Theater.

home Sweet Home opens in the Polygon Gallery.

THURSDAY: Opening of the Vancouver artist Rydel Cerezo‘s solo exhibition of original photographs and vintage images collaged with found material, home Sweet Homewhich runs until December 11th at the Polygon Gallery.

THURSDAY: Australian indie pop singer Julia Jacklin plays the Commodore Ballroom.

THURSDAY: clarinetist James Danderfer is joined by Vibes player Atley King and bassist Dan Howard for Jazz in the Parlor at Roedde House Museum.

THURSDAY: Canadian folk-punk rocker Eugene Ripper plays the Off the Rail Brewing Co.

THURSDAY: White Rock Players Club presented opening night by Ken Ludwig Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mysteryruns until October 16th White Rock Playhouse.

FRIDAY: Brewhalla, the North Vancouver Beer Festival, features craft beer and live music district shipyards.

FRIDAY: Ex-Barenaked Ladies frontman Steven Page performs at the ACT Arts Center in the maple ridge.

Vancouver Paint Night takes place at Parker Studios.
TANA LYNN

FRIDAY: Vancouver Paint Night at Parker Studios is a painting party led by an expert host.

FRIDAY: an entertaining alternative to Vivaldi Four Seasons at Christ Church CathedralThe Other Seasons pairs concertos for the six musicians of Ensemble Castor with arias and motets by the Venetian “Red Priest”.

FRIDAY: Nigerian-born English hip-hop artist Jacob Banks plays the Commodore Ballroomwith guest Meg Mac.

FRIDAY: Canadian blues rocker Colin James plays it Queen Elizabeth Theaterwith guests the Ally Venable Band.

FRIDAY: Fundraiser for the Indian Residential School Survivors Society at the Anza Club features performances by indigenous music artists Dakota Bear, JB The First Ladyand Hayley Wallis.

FRIDAY: Abra Cadabra presents his tribute to Swedish pop legends ABBA In the Centennial Theater in Nord van.

Stewart Copeland performs with the VSO at the Orpheum.

FRIDAY: Legendary drummer Stewart Copeland performs songs from his old band The Police Vancouver Symphony In the Orpheum Theater.

FRIDAY: Australian electronica/downtempo singer-songwriter Chet Faker plays the Vogue Theater.

FRIDAY: Opening night of British comedy Around the gardenruns until October 16th Metro Theater.

FRIDAY: The BC Lions take on the Ottawa Redblacks in Canadian Football League action BC Place Stadium.

FRIDAY: Psychedelic folk rock band from Tokyo, Kikagaku Moyo, plays the Rickshaw Theater.

FRIDAY: Vancouver guitar wizard Paul Pigat plays the Bez Arts Hub at Langley.

Jeanette Kotowich performs at the dance center.

FRIDAY: Indigenous dance artist Jeanette Kotowich performs new work, KisiskaciwanIn the Scotiabank Dance Center.

To see hundreds of other event listings, visit our Things to Do in Vancouver page, and follow along for the latest updates and announcements Events in Vancouver on twitter.

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Martial arts master Joe Joyce reckons an 8,000-mile trip for kung fu training will help him belt Joseph Parker https://maoriart.net/martial-arts-master-joe-joyce-reckons-an-8000-mile-trip-for-kung-fu-training-will-help-him-belt-joseph-parker/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 21:31:06 +0000 https://maoriart.net/martial-arts-master-joe-joyce-reckons-an-8000-mile-trip-for-kung-fu-training-will-help-him-belt-joseph-parker/ MARTIAL ARTS MASTER Joe Joyce reckons his kung fu training will help him belt Joseph Parker on Saturday. The Putney Juggernaut, 37, missed his own degree and squandered his last student loan installment to fly 8,000 miles and study at a Shaolin monastery in China. 4 Joyce trained in kung fu 4 He traveled to […]]]>

MARTIAL ARTS MASTER Joe Joyce reckons his kung fu training will help him belt Joseph Parker on Saturday.

The Putney Juggernaut, 37, missed his own degree and squandered his last student loan installment to fly 8,000 miles and study at a Shaolin monastery in China.

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Joyce trained in kung fu
He traveled to China to train after graduation

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He traveled to China to train after graduationCredit: Delivered
The heavyweight boxer studied as a Shaolin kung fu master

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The heavyweight boxer studied as a Shaolin kung fu masterCredit: Delivered

Joyce, who studied fine arts at Middlesex University and excelled in rugby and athletics in his youth, meets New Zealand heavyweight Parker in Manchester.

And the winner is up for a world title that will shoot up the WBO crown currently held by Oleksandr Usyk.

After returning from another training camp in Las Vegas, the 14-0 pro – who was stripped of his Olympic gold at the Rio 2016 Games – told SunSport: “I’ve always made the choice to travel for training, I have never feared or shied away from .

“I went to China to do Shaolin Kung Fu right after I graduated. I actually missed the ceremony, so I never tossed my hat or wore the dress.

Joyce meets Parker on Saturday

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Joyce meets Parker on SaturdayPhoto credit: Reuters

“I used what little student loan I had to fly to China and do four kung fu sessions a day for a month.

“It was a camp of foreigners who each had a coach – we ran at 5 a.m., then did strength training, and then did technique, sambo or wushu. I had just started boxing at the time so they complemented each other.”

Joyce shared these incredible photos with SunSport but ruled out a potential big-money MMA move. He said: “I think I could do an MMA fight.

“My punch is good enough for a few fights against similar opponents.

JOIN SUN VEGAS AT: GET A FREE £10 BONUS WITH 100 GAMES TO PLAY AND NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED (T&Cs apply)

“But I would have to do a lot of wrestling and grappling practice. And I really don’t feel like rolling around with a big guy’s sweaty scrotum taped to my forehead.”

Computer game superfan Joyce is the opposite of your usual flashy, trash-talking combatant. He added: “I like to keep my personal life pretty private. I don’t feel the need to share too much.

“My girlfriend may like the celebrity lifestyle more than I do, or just the Chanel bags that go with it.

“The more interviews I do, the better I get.

“I’m feeling more comfortable and confident and now I have to pull my finger out and do more.”

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Seeds for a better future of forestry at Fieldays 2022 https://maoriart.net/seeds-for-a-better-future-of-forestry-at-fieldays-2022/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 05:49:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/seeds-for-a-better-future-of-forestry-at-fieldays-2022/ Thursday, September 22, 2022 at 5:49 p.mPress release: Fieldays NZ For the first time ever, Fieldays visitors will have the opportunity to learn about forestry from more than 40 industry organizations and companies under one roof. Themed “Timber – Our Low Carbon Future”, the Fieldays Forestry Hub will be a dedicated area at this year’s […]]]>

For the first time ever, Fieldays visitors will have the opportunity to learn about forestry from more than 40 industry organizations and companies under one roof.

Themed “Timber – Our Low Carbon Future”, the Fieldays Forestry Hub will be a dedicated area at this year’s Fieldays event, giving visitors the opportunity to explore the many facets of the forestry and woodworking industry and how it is developing to play a key role in mitigation of climate change.

At the hub, visitors will discover engaging experiences on forestry, climate change, wood products, timber construction, biosecurity and biodiversity. There will also be two forest simulators on site so that visitors big and small can experience what it’s like to operate machines in the forest.

The hub is a collaboration between Fieldays and an advisory group consisting of Te Uru Rākau – New Zealand Forest Service, Forest Growers Levy Trust, Scion, NZ Forest Owners Association, Red Stag, NZ Farm Forestry Association and Future Foresters. Hub spokesman Alex Wilson says the multibillion-dollar forest sector is a major employer in New Zealand, employing over 35,000 people both year-round and seasonally.

“We are entering an exciting phase in forestry and wood processing that is creating tremendous job opportunities. People of all ages and abilities can find great careers in this sector – from planting and managing native forests and caring for the forest environment, to managing people and resources, to working with cutting-edge technology.

“We also want to bring people closer to the possibilities of trees – anything that is a fossil fuel today can be made from a tree in the future. We will feature bioplastic vine clips, leather shoes tanned with pine bark tannin, insights into biofuels and a demonstration of how drone technology is changing the game,” says Alex Wilson.

Farm Forestry Association President Graham West says the FFA has given strong support to the Fieldays Forestry Hub and been heavily involved in its design and development.

“We want to reach out to landowners with the message that agricultural forestry is working well for our members and is an important option for future sustainable land use in New Zealand.”

Graham West says the Hub’s Agroforestry Division will have hands-on experts and information available on several plantation types, with a focus on redwoods, eucalyptus, cypress, poplar and willow, and radiata pine.

“We also support and facilitate the ‘grow-a-tree’ competition for children.”

Forest Owners Association President Grant Dodson adds that forestry is an excellent land use opportunity for farmers.

“The hub is all about sharing information so that forestry is better understood and farmers who want it can be better informed before they invest.

“We see integrated land use with trees on farms as a real opportunity to increase long-term total returns from agriculture while improving environmental outcomes, particularly in light of climate change.”

New Zealand has around 1.7 million hectares of productive forests across the country and is currently the world’s largest exporter of softwood logs. Plans are also underway through Te Uru Rākau’s Industry Transformation Plan to add value to our forest sector through the processing of wood materials in New Zealand, which in turn will create even more career and employment opportunities.

That’s why it was a no-brainer for Peter Nation, CEO of the National New Zealand Fieldays Society, to set up a new center at Fieldays in 2022, with a focus on forestry and timber processing.

“This is the first time Fieldays has included something so specific to the forestry and timber processing sectors, which is well deserved as they continue to be such an important primary industry in our country,” says Peter Nation.

“There is a tremendous need for workers of all types in the industry – the range of skills that can be tapped is amazing.

“We are so fortunate to have these companies and organizations here to showcase and show how an interest in forestry can quickly become a career.”

Children are encouraged to visit the Fieldays Forestry Hub with the launch of the Kids Grow a Great Tree campaign. Children who take part in the competition will receive a young potted tree to take home and care for. Forestry professionals will keep in touch with this next generation of arborists and provide advice on how to care for and care for their trees.

The Fieldays Forestry Hub joins the Fieldays Innovation Hub, the Fieldays Opportunity Grows Here Careers Hub and the Fieldays Hauora Taiwhenua Health & Wellbeing Hub as focus areas for visitors to explore during Fieldays.

© Scoop Media

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World of WearableArt to remain in Wellington for next five years, deal confirmed https://maoriart.net/world-of-wearableart-to-remain-in-wellington-for-next-five-years-deal-confirmed/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 06:20:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/world-of-wearableart-to-remain-in-wellington-for-next-five-years-deal-confirmed/ Wellington will host the annual World of WearableArt Show for a further five years, it has been confirmed after an agreement was reached between the show and regional economic development agency WellingtonNZ. On Tuesday, the agency confirmed the show would remain in the capital but declined to say what incentives it may have offered to […]]]>

Wellington will host the annual World of WearableArt Show for a further five years, it has been confirmed after an agreement was reached between the show and regional economic development agency WellingtonNZ.

On Tuesday, the agency confirmed the show would remain in the capital but declined to say what incentives it may have offered to the art-meets-fashion extravaganza, citing commercial sensibilities.

However, WellingtonNZ chief executive John Allen confirmed that no underwriting provision was included as part of the five-year signing.

Representatives from Wellington City Council and World of WearableArt also declined to comment on details of the agreement.

CONTINUE READING:
* Wellington is paying more than $3.6 million for the pre-packaged World of WearableArt event
* Wearable art organizers sought more taxpayer money, in addition to $5 million
* World of WearableArt Show canceled due to Covid-19

Seraph by Zeng Ying-Syuan from Taipei National University of the Arts, Taiwan is modeled in the 2019 show.

Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images

Seraph by Zeng Ying-Syuan from Taipei National University of the Arts, Taiwan is modeled in the 2019 show.

News of the deal comes a week before this year’s show premieres at Wellington’s TSB Arena on September 29.

Last year, Wellington City Council bailed out the $3.6 million show after it was canceled due to Covid-19, having previously agreed to take over the show should it be canceled due to the pandemic.

Part of this acquisition agreement with the council was that the show would remain in Wellington for five more years. However, the deal had not been signed as of December, despite the takeover agreement being struck in February last year.

World of WearableArt CEO David Tingey said the deal would give the show’s organizers peace of mind as the show looks set to expand over the next five years.

Dancers perform during the 2019 World of WearableArt Show.

Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images

Dancers perform during the 2019 World of WearableArt Show.

In an interview last year, new Executive Creative Producer Brian Burke spoke about the regional and international expansion of the spectacle.

This could include the creation of more urban experiences at local businesses and cultural venues, new events and exhibitions, regional competitions, touring, more audiovisual and immersive aspects of the show, the use of musicians like Estère and even a possible television program, Burke said.

“Every year when WOW is here, you know it. It illuminates Wellington with a vibrant energy. Post Covid isolation, we are all acutely aware of the importance of arts and culture in our cities and in our enjoyment of life,” Allen said in an emailed statement on Tuesday.

Isobaa by Jean Valentine from <a class=New Zealand being sculpted during the 2019 World of WearableArt Show.” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images

Isobaa by Jean Valentine from New Zealand being sculpted during the 2019 World of WearableArt Show.

The event was estimated to have contributed $28 million to the local economy at its last event in 2019, but Covid-19 forced its cancellation in 2020 and 2021.

The show has had its home in Wellington since 2005.

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Is Roger Federer the greatest artist in the history of sport? https://maoriart.net/is-roger-federer-the-greatest-artist-in-the-history-of-sport/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 13:30:05 +0000 https://maoriart.net/is-roger-federer-the-greatest-artist-in-the-history-of-sport/ For much of the 20thth For the twentieth century—that is, for most of the history of professional sport—arts and sport were widely considered almost mutually exclusive. In fact, it was a common belief, especially in the West, that it was almost impossible for one to love both equally. Much of the British education and class […]]]>

For much of the 20thth For the twentieth century—that is, for most of the history of professional sport—arts and sport were widely considered almost mutually exclusive. In fact, it was a common belief, especially in the West, that it was almost impossible for one to love both equally. Much of the British education and class system was based on the belief that athletes (of course, for most of the 20th century, professional athletes wereth Century) and artists were so fundamentally different that the two could never meet. And more recently Frasierperhaps the greatest television sitcom of all time, was largely based on the conflict between a sports-loving father and a sports-loathing son.

Luckily on the 21stSt By the end of the 20th century, this old and, above all, artificial separation between art and sport has largely been abolished, so that today it is quite possible to admit to loving art and sport equally. More importantly, it is now universally acknowledged that the very greatest sport can reach the quality of art. At his peak with his Arsenal Invincibles side in 2004, Arsène Wenger was open about the idea that the best football is an art form. But with all due respect to Wenger, his greatest Arsenal team and all other particularly graceful sportsmen, the greatest sports artist of all time is undoubtedly Roger Federer.

Of course, it helped that Federer played tennis, which has always been the sport for aesthetes. That was probably one of the reasons it was the last major professional sport to go fully professional (with the exception of rugby union, which doesn’t have the global reach of tennis); it was felt that tennis was such a uniquely pure, expressive and individual sport that playing was its own reward and required no reward. And it is certainly the sport most loved by artists, even great artists.

Debussy wrote a ballet Jeux (Games) based on a tennis match; Janus Metz Pedersen’s grandeur Borg McEnroe (2017) is probably the most artistic film ever made about sports; and perhaps the most important line in Hilary Mantel’s oeuvre Wolfhalle tRilogy of novels about Thomas Cromwell comes when Cromwell muses near the end of the trilogy, “It’s all tennis, isn’t it?” and directly compares the continuous exchange of words and ideas between people to the exchange of strokes between tennis players.

However, despite the general adoration of tennis by artists, Federer always enjoyed special attention from them. In fact, he almost has his own body of work, consisting of great essays and books about him. The best of these are the famous essay by the late David Foster Wallace, Roger Federer as a religious experience (2006 (https://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/20/sports/playmagazine/20federer.html)and William Skidelsky’s remarkable memoirs, Federer and I: A Tale of Obsession (2015). Both Foster Wallace and Skidelsky were good junior tennis players, especially Foster Wallace, so they knew what they were writing about as they marveled at the ease with which Federer played what was probably the most technically demanding sport.

As both Foster Wallace and Skidelsky argued, Federer’s game was truly artistic. It was a unique combination of absolutely fluid movements (Charlie Chaplin once said the most beautiful thing he had ever seen was Helen Wills Moody’s movement on a tennis court, but he never saw Federer); almost unbelievably imaginative hitting (he really announced himself to the world with his running half-volley against Andy Roddick in the 2003 Wimbledon semifinals, which was a shot most tennis commentators had never imagined let alone seen); and, crucially compared to his main rivals Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic, endless attacking tactics, whether he was serving and volleying (as he did much more early in his career) or a baseline-dominated game.

That Federer is the most graceful tennis player of all time is now an almost universally accepted truth, but he is arguably the most graceful athlete of all time. Surely it is impossible to imagine another athlete who has hit the two sweet spots of being beautiful to look at at the same time and extraordinarily successful. In football, Zinedine Zidane is perhaps the closest equivalent, but even he has not achieved a level of success at club or international level comparable to Federer’s 20 Majors in 15 years (2003-2018).

In golf, Seve Ballesteros has matched Federer’s flair but not his continued success, winning a relatively meager five Majors compared to Federer’s 20; In cricket, David Gower is often cited as the most elegant batsman of all time, but he failed to reproduce his best form against the great West Indian bowling attack of the late 1970s and 1980s. In “contact sports” like rugby union, rugby league or American football, only Barry John ever achieved Federer-like levels of grace and ghostly movement, and even then only for an enticingly short time (mainly from 1971 onwards). the only victorious tour of New Zealand by the British and Irish Lions).

After Novak Djokovic narrowly failed to win the Calendar Grand Slam a year ago when he lost to Daniil Medvedev in the US Open final, I wrote that Federer should resign while he still has at least Djokovic and Nadal at the helm of the tournament Men’s tennis has a total of 20 majors. Stupidly, Federer didn’t follow my advice! He was then statistically surpassed by Nadal and Djokovic who have now won 22 and 21 Majors respectively and they could win more.

However, what Nadal, Djokovic or any other tennis player, including the sport’s big new star Carlos Alcaraz, will ever manage is to surpass Federer stylistically. It’s simply impossible to imagine that a future tennis player could ever combine grace and power in the way Federer does, not least because the arrival of Alcaraz has likely propelled tennis into a new era where power will always replace grace. (Dave Grohl once dubbed Queen “The Beatles on Steroids”; similarly, Alcaraz is a pumped-up, powerful version of Federer at his best.)

Consequently, even if Federer is no longer “The GOAT (Greatest of All Time)” in terms of the number of Majors he has won, he will always be “The GROAT (Graceful-est Of All Time)”. Not only is he the most aesthetically pleasing tennis player that has ever existed, but he is also the most aesthetically pleasing athlete that has ever existed. No one has ever done more to elevate mere sport to the level of great art, and for that, those of us who love sport and art alike will always revere and celebrate it.

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Embed from Getty Images

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Te Ao Earth Week! | Scoop News https://maoriart.net/te-ao-earth-week-scoop-news/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 03:40:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/te-ao-earth-week-scoop-news/ Thursday, September 15, 2022 at 3:40 p.mPress release: TerraNova Te Ao Earth Week is a celebration of the vernal equinox and a call for environmental protection. In Aotearoa, New Zealand we are seeing a rapid decline in our ecosystems and globally we are seeing a huge increase in extreme climatic events. Te Ao Earth Week […]]]>

Te Ao Earth Week is a celebration of the vernal equinox and a call for environmental protection. In Aotearoa, New Zealand we are seeing a rapid decline in our ecosystems and globally we are seeing a huge increase in extreme climatic events. Te Ao Earth Week is about empowering people to make a difference.

Rose Challies, CEO of the Terra Nova Foundation, the charity behind the event, says change for the better can happen and often surprisingly quickly, but it requires meaningful and effective action by everyone. She says: “It’s not about doing something, it’s about doing something effective – and everyone, at home, in business and in the community, has a role to play. Te Ao Earth Week is an opportunity for people to find out what they can do and be inspired to take action for change.’

The main event is a speaker series taking place online September 19-24 at the Pūmanawa Gallery (Arts Center, Ōtautahi Christchurch). Top experts will talk about what effective action is and give examples of how we can take steps to make a difference. Speakers include top economists Shamubeel Eaqub and Impact Investment Leaders
Barry Coates from Mindful Money, who will talk about how we can make a difference with our money and investments. Community and Taiao leaders Anake Goodallfrom Seed the Change, Mananui RamsdenChairman Te Rūnaka o Koukourārata, and Vicky BuckClimate Action Campus, will talk about the roles we can take to connect with our earth and engage in climate action, whether you are a young person/rangatahi or an older/kaumatua or somewhere in between.

Tim LoftusNZ Merino and
Grant Ryan, Cacophony Project, PurePods discuss what it means to be an earthbound company. While digital leaders Ben Reidfounder of Memia, Jannat Maqboolby ecosystem and
Kurt Janssen, Founder/CEO of Orbica, will speak about the role that data, technology, AI and XR can play in environmental change and our future resilience. and
Rose ChalliesCEO of TerraNova,
Amy CarterCEO of the Christchurch Foundation and Hayley GugliettaAvon Ōtākaro Network will speak on what it takes to bring about large-scale change to maximize impact through coordinated cross-sector, cross-industry action and work in the Greater Ōtautahi Christchurch area.

It’s an exciting line-up, with each day offering a new theme and inspired action for our planet. This speaker series goes well beyond a talk fest and continues with speakers and participants who are part of environmental change task forces.

There is also an incredible exhibition of world-class wildlife photography at the Pūmanawa Gallery (Arts Centre, Ōtautahi Christchurch). Photographers include previous NZ Geographic Photographer of the Year Alden Williamsand award-winning Larryn Rae, Toby Dickson and crystal tabby. The exhibition is a celebration of our wildlife and includes award-winning photographs of the most incredible native wildlife and our interaction with it. Surrounded by native plants, the images come to life and transport you to the beauty of our waters and landscapes – an exhibition not to be missed. Free entry for everyone, open from September 19th to 24th every day from 10am.

Te Ao Earth Week is the premier event of the Terra Nova Foundation, a charity established to drive environmental change and to help individuals, businesses and the community engage in effective action. Launched in 2021, the terranova.foundation website is a new and growing resource for anyone wanting to take their first steps in meaningful action. Rose Challies, CEO, wants people to take full advantage of their own individual contributions. “We want people to think about what they can do to take effective action – everyone is unique, with different traits, skills, connections and resources that can make a big difference. A lot of people just don’t know where to start and we’re here to help them.”

The event is supported by Adgraphics, Nutrient Rescue, Kiwiflora Nurseries, Christchurch Foundation, Scratch, Art Boss and Sherwood-Work

© Scoop Media

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Ravichandran Ashwin’s T20 World Cup Selection is a triumph of T20 bowling https://maoriart.net/ravichandran-ashwins-t20-world-cup-selection-is-a-triumph-of-t20-bowling/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 12:29:23 +0000 https://maoriart.net/ravichandran-ashwins-t20-world-cup-selection-is-a-triumph-of-t20-bowling/ The leading Indian off-spinner was an excellent practitioner of defensive bowling skills in T20 cricket. When Ravichandran Ashwin takes on Sri Lanka’s dangerous mid-range power hitter Bhanuka Rajapaksa in a clash at the Asia Cup 2022 in Dubai, former Indian player Sanjay Manjrekar began commenting on the duel from the comment box for a crucial […]]]>

The leading Indian off-spinner was an excellent practitioner of defensive bowling skills in T20 cricket.

When Ravichandran Ashwin takes on Sri Lanka’s dangerous mid-range power hitter Bhanuka Rajapaksa in a clash at the Asia Cup 2022 in Dubai, former Indian player Sanjay Manjrekar began commenting on the duel from the comment box for a crucial point in the game.

It was important to Manjrekar that Ashwin maintain his “stickball” – the off-break – to try to parry the opposing left-hander. The veteran commentator felt it would be a mistake on Ashwin’s part against Rajapaksa not to keep that classic flight and drift and allow Sri Lanka to run away with the game.

However, what happened on the field was in complete contrast to Manjrekar’s assessment. The moment Ashwin floated the ball up as part of his overall lineup, Rajapaksa and partner Dasun Shanaka quickly used their feet, trusting the surface’s accuracy and batting the bowler away. Rajapaksa found a six to deep mid-wicket region while Kusal Mendis hit a similarly flown off-break via covers earlier in the innings.

But as the bowler slipped the ball down a lower trajectory, he found a significant leash on run scoring that was more characteristic of his nature in T20s. Take away those two sixes and Ashwin had a daily value of 1/20 less of his remaining 22 deliveries in defense of a goal that forced Sri Lanka to operate over 8.5 and up.

But when it came down to the action on the field, Manjrekar kept encouraging the bowler to keep flying and pumping the ball up, hoping for the turn that wasn’t there. Why would a commentator ask Ashwin to embark on a trick he’d just seen fail?

The quality of the commentary offered throughout the Asian Cup left a lot to be desired for the viewer. But what Manjrekar did essentially deepened the chasm that continues to exist between actual T20 action and how commentators have spoken about it. There’s a shocking bias towards the traditional skills that work in tests and ODIs, and a deeper sense of disregard or lack of understanding of what makes T20 a different sport in its own right.

Leading broadcasters continue to employ prominent retired cricketers to hold the mic, which in turn leads to tactically misguided commentary for the viewer in T20 as these former players are inherently detached from the essentials of the format. Audiences are quick to absorb these gentlemen’s words, a scenario that would require careful scrutiny of the game for them to earn their paychecks. But the commentary for T20 is stuck in an old era where there is no wiggle room to understand and respect the concept of defensive bowling skill.

With the lower trajectory being at heart of their longtime bug-bear and wicket-taking, the average viewer is likely to negatively sway opinion of bowlers like R Ashwin in the shortest format when he or she hears these commentators. Manjrekar & Co. failed to recognize and convey why Ashwin’s landing the ball away from the batter’s arc is a compelling solution to avoiding the downswing in unassisted bowler conditions.

You can’t tell the viewer that “I would take 3 for 40 any day of the week over 0/24” and expect him to weigh heavy words like hard lengths and defensive trajectories. if you tell him “wicket taking” is the be-all and end-all, leaving the viewer woefully misinformed about T20 bowling.

For commentators, wicket-taking in T20 cricket consists of levitating the ball near the arc and causing it to spin or swing with a stickball to release the batsman in the conventional manner. You can’t do that as a bowler until you want to be sent to your peak as the lane doesn’t give you grip and spin, nor does the white kookaburra have a stitch strong enough to move laterally in the air and off the deck .

Ravichandran Ashwin’s T20I Sojourn commands respect for the art of defensive bowling

Most T20 surfaces and the general conditions in which the format is played, force the bowler to improve on defensive bowling skills. As a spinner, getting the batter to find the fielder at depth, not the limit, and invariably keeping the ball off the arc when the big shot arrives is the surest means of getting the batter to find it.

Why would you challenge the sweet spot of these bulky racquets on flat pitches should be the follow-up question to the Manjrekars of the world when they are so obsessed with Test play lines, lengths and trajectories, depriving the viewer of actual T20 play, which in turn leads to a ill-informed discourse about its best practitioners.

That’s why R Ashwin’s T20 World Cup selection is a triumph of T20 cricket and defensive bowling skills. An ever-evolving cricket brain, Ashwin was one of the earliest figures to understand and adapt to the demands of the format. Ashwin was mocked when he said: “Six well-constructed bad balls could be the way forward in T20”, but his prophecy has only since been fulfilled.

That “bad eggs” Ashwin was referring to a set of top six saves delivered in terms of surface area, general conditions and opposing hitter available. Rashid Khan, the world’s largest recognized spinner with limited surpluses, has now built his own T20 empire by absorbing this trait. Rashid kept it dead straight on a low trajectory, throwing an indecipherable mix of googlies and legbreaks to celebrate some notable wood against his opponents.

But Rashid is a wrist spinner, with the game enabling his success. What Ashwin, a finger spinner, managed to do despite the rules and rules of the game in T20Is and IPL is a great case study of one of modern cricket’s finest spin bowlers. With the game’s keepers pressuring the “Doosra,” Ashwin had to dig deep into his determination to take the ball away from the right-hander and take their goal on a leash.

Since his comeback last year, Ashwin has sent over 48% of his overs down on point balls and has had an economy rate of 6.10 with 14 wickets from 10 T20Is for India. In his overall career, the off-spinner has recorded just 6.81 an over in 56 games and 66 wickets. 58 of those overs were delivered in the field restriction phase, where Ashwin managed to keep the batters to a very respectable 7.48 overs despite only two boundary riders.

Against India’s toughest opponents on Ashwin’s career timeline – Australia, England, South Africa, New Zealand and Pakistan – the 35-year-old has an aggregate economy rate of 7.40 in 29 games from 28 wickets. Among the Indian spinners, only Yuzvendra Chahal (38) has taken more wickets against this group of opponents. But he took her at 8:54.

In Australia vs Australia, a place considered a graveyard for finger spinners, Ashwin has a T20I economy rating of 7.40 over five games. No Indian bowler could claim to be that stingy in these encounters, which somehow dispels the perception that Ashwin is unfit for an Australian World Cup.

also read – Why India cannot return to Mohammed Shami in T20Is

Chahal is a symbolic figure of what warms the hearts of traditionalists and current commentators serving the format. His tendency to fly the ball up is always raved about from the box, and anything else is criticized by these gentlemen.

And that despite the fact that he is one of the most expensive T20I spinners ever with a career economy of 8.08 after 66 games. Chahal has been going for 8.28+ over 39 T20Is since early 2019. The 32-year-old is considered a wicket-taker when in reality he has averaged over 30 with a strike rate of over 22 for almost three years.

That Chahal had this decrease in his wicket-taking frequency over such a large sample size confirms the cancellation or disapproval of his method in this format. And underscores the greatness of Ashwin, the T20 cricketer, while reinforcing the necessary art of defensive bowling.

At his best, even Chahal pins him away from the arc, forcing batsmen to drag the ball for options against the spinning ball. But he hasn’t been at his best for well over three seasons now and was one of the main reasons India were eliminated early from this Asian Cup.

That should have gotten gentlemen holding the mic to reconsider what they think, know and are telling the viewer about the T20 action. But we’re a long way from getting there until broadcasters mandate certain specific standards for these ex-cricketers to achieve with their commentary.

First, let’s celebrate the triumph of R Ashwin and what it means for the art of defensive bowling.



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Napier expects the cruise industry to bring $30 million and 150,000 people to the region this season https://maoriart.net/napier-expects-the-cruise-industry-to-bring-30-million-and-150000-people-to-the-region-this-season/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 01:08:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/napier-expects-the-cruise-industry-to-bring-30-million-and-150000-people-to-the-region-this-season/ Things Up to 90 cruise ships, the largest of which is almost 350m long, will dock in Napier over the next few months. (file photo) Napier is looking forward to the return of the international cruise industry with up to 90 passenger ships carrying up to 150,000 visitors set to call at the seaside city […]]]>
Up to 90 cruise ships, the largest of which is almost 350m long, will dock in Napier over the next few months.  (file photo)

Things

Up to 90 cruise ships, the largest of which is almost 350m long, will dock in Napier over the next few months. (file photo)

Napier is looking forward to the return of the international cruise industry with up to 90 passenger ships carrying up to 150,000 visitors set to call at the seaside city over the next few months.

It’s estimated that cruise ship visitors will bring in about $30 million to Hawke’s Bay from October to April next year.

The cruise industry, which has been on pause since the pandemic began, is slowly returning as the first cruise ship returned to New Zealand late last month.

This brings new economic opportunities, but also poses other challenges to the ongoing staff shortages in the hospitality and retail sectors and to managing the spread of Covid-19.

CONTINUE READING:
* Welcome aboard, unvaccinated cruise ship passengers
* Cruise giants are dropping vaccination requirements
* “Descent into Hell”: 880 days later, a ship enters the port
* Cheat sheet: The Covid rules for cruise lines have changed. Here’s what you need to know
* Hastings and Napier: Investing in Growth and Vibrancy “Expanding the Narrative”

A presentation attended by more than 80 retailers, hotel owners and managers, as well as council members and other industry leaders in Napier earlier this week generated excitement about the construction of the upcoming cruise ship season.

Pip Thompson, general manager of Napier City Business Inc, said it would help bring a “sense of fun, energy and vibrancy” to the city that was previously lacking. “Without vibrancy, it’s been a tough few years.”

While there have been issues with cruise tourism fatigue in the past, she said there is a renewed enthusiasm for what it has to offer.

“Only six New Zealand cities have the ability to accommodate cruise ships,” she said. “We’re lucky they’re visiting our city, so look forward to the influx of visitors.”

Locals had catered to businesses through the “Buy local love local” campaign, but Thompson said it would be good if international visitors came back to benefit the region as a whole.

The return of up to 150,000 international cruise visitors will bring additional 'liveliness' to Napier, says Pip Thompson, general manager of Napier City Business Inc. (file photo)

Gianina Schwanecke/Stuff

The return of up to 150,000 international cruise visitors will bring additional ‘liveliness’ to Napier, says Pip Thompson, general manager of Napier City Business Inc. (file photo)

Challenges remained related to staff shortages, particularly in the hospitality sector, and she said it was important for businesses to start planning now.

Hamish Saxton, managing director of Hawke’s Bay Tourism, said Napier has always received positive reviews, particularly for its art deco architecture.

He said there had been a lot of planning behind the scenes to “ensure the best possible experience for visitors and local communities alike”.

Napier Port, Napier iSITE and Hawke’s Bay Tourism worked on a Return to Cruise strategy to identify potential concerns. This included creating ship and passenger spend for companies to help them make decisions related to operating hours and staffing.

Todd Dawson, Chief Executive of Napier Port, was equally thrilled to welcome back cruise ships, especially given the port’s recently completed $170 million wharf extension work.

Napier Port Chief Executive Todd Dawson is delighted to welcome back cruise ships.

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Napier Port Chief Executive Todd Dawson is delighted to welcome back cruise ships.

He said there would be a “much needed boost” for local tourism businesses, retail and hospitality.

The new 350 meter quay is capable of berthing the largest cruise ships coming to New Zealand, including the Oasis class liners, as well as container and bulk carriers.

The first cruise scheduled to visit Napier will be the Ovation of the Seas, arriving on October 24. With a length of 347.08 m, she is also the largest ship to dock in the port.

Kevin O’Sullivan, chief executive of the New Zealand Cruise Association, said earlier Things The industry was worth US$565 million to New Zealand in 2019 – a 28% increase from the previous year.

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Why a visit to Marlborough sounds divine https://maoriart.net/why-a-visit-to-marlborough-sounds-divine/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 22:11:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/why-a-visit-to-marlborough-sounds-divine/ If you were tasked with designing the perfect vacation destination, what would it entail? Lots of sunshine, more than 150 wineries, world-famous hiking trails and 4000 km² of coastline that ducks and dives around wonderfully secluded bays? CONTINUE READING:* The new house and garden look right at home in the Lyttelton heritage area* Expansive Taranaki […]]]>

If you were tasked with designing the perfect vacation destination, what would it entail?

Lots of sunshine, more than 150 wineries, world-famous hiking trails and 4000 km² of coastline that ducks and dives around wonderfully secluded bays?

CONTINUE READING:
* The new house and garden look right at home in the Lyttelton heritage area
* Expansive Taranaki Garden filled with color and fun
* The spectacular, art-filled Taranaki house matches its dramatic beachfront location

If you answered yes, then resign because it already exists. Sprawling across the upper right corner of the South Island, Marlborough scores on the holiday bingo map with its pretty tunes.

Here’s what to tick on your next visit to the region.

Cellar door from Cloudy Bay, Marlborough Sounds.

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Cellar door from Cloudy Bay, Marlborough Sounds.

experience

Can you visit Marlborough without stopping by a winery? You could, but why would you want to? This is New Zealand‘s premier wine-growing region, home to around 27,000 hectares of vines, or two-thirds of the country’s total wine-growing area. There are also more than 30 cellar doors where you can meet the winemakers and sample their wares, including Cloudy Bay and Framingham. Sign up with a company that will drive you around so you don’t have to slurp and spit.

drink

Wine grabs all the headlines in Marlborough, but craft beer gets a look at Boom Town Beer Garden, Tap Room & Courtyard in Renwick. In addition to tasting Boom Town Brews and Brew Pub Drops on tap, you guessed it local wines are also available. Here you will also find good food, a playroom for the kids and a roaring fireplace.

Marlborough Restaurants Arbor, left, and Frank's Oyster Bar and Eatery.

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Marlborough Restaurants Arbor, left, and Frank’s Oyster Bar and Eatery.

meal

Local chef Sam Webb borrowed the name of a relative (and his parents’ winery in Marlborough) for his first restaurant, Frank’s Oyster Bar and Eatery. Don’t be fooled by the name though – as well as delicious oysters, Blenheim also offers contemporary dishes for sharing, using some of Marlborough’s finest ingredients. Try the tempura oyster tartare or, if you’re in the carnivore mood, the confit of lamb shoulder with lots of sumac, red onions and pistachios.

At Arbor in Renwick, owners Liz Buttimore and Bradley Hornby source their seasonal, fresh ingredients almost daily and there’s little that comes close to the joy of dining with food you’ve passed down on the way to the restaurant. That means dishes like hāpuka with pickled celery or whipped caramelized yogurt with sorrel. Everything is of course served with a glass of something local.

Is your sweet tooth gnawing on you? Then Makana Confections is definitely worth a stop. This is home to handcrafted Marlborough Pinot Noir truffles, macadamia caramel corn and macadamia butter toffee crunch, which is sugar-sweet in beauty.

Blenheim luxury boutique Thomas's.

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Blenheim luxury boutique Thomas’s.

business

Enjoy some of the area’s best shopping experiences at Blenheim’s luxury boutique Thomas’s. With jewelry by Karen Walker, framed bird prints by Auckland artist Kirsty Nixon and luxurious linens by Aussie-New Zealand brand Baksana, you’re sure to find something to take home.

Talented antipodes can also be seen at No 4 Boutique in Blenheim, which has curated the best of local and Australian fashion designers since 2012. Brands include Kathryn Wilson, Caitlin Crisp and Aureta Studio.

Garden Marlborough Festival.

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Garden Marlborough Festival.

Visit

The region’s newest attraction, the Omaka Observatory, opened its doors on July 1st. This crater observatory in the Omaka Valley is perfectly located to take advantage of the region’s exceptionally clear skies.

The purpose built facility has been designed to minimize light pollution and wind effects, all the better for taking advantage of the southern skies. The choice of telescopes allows visitors to discover planets, galaxies, star clusters and the moon. Don’t miss the special Tātai Arorangi sessions with the Te Reo Māori presenters who uncover the tales and legends of heaven.

Want to see how the green-fingered locals do it? Then plan a visit to the Garden Marlborough Festival from November 3rd to 6th, returning for the first time since 2020. Think workshops and take a tour of some of the region’s best gardens.

Bay of Many Bays, Marlborough Sounds.

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Bay of Many Bays, Marlborough Sounds.

Stay

Want to put your head where Tom Cruise, Harrison Ford and Benedict Cumberbatch have all put it? Then hop on a ferry to the Bay of Many Coves luxury resort. About half an hour’s boat ride from Picton in the Marlborough Sounds, this small five-star establishment is an unabashed celebration of good food, wine and style.

In addition to the stylish rooms and insanely beautiful water views from every room, there are 120 acres of private bush to explore, two restaurants and all the privacy a Hollywood star (or you) could ever ask for.

You don’t have to like golf to stay at The Nineteenth, the sleek black self-catering guest accommodation next to the Marlborough Golf Course – but if you do, you’ll feel like you’re in heaven. The architecturally designed two bedroom cottage will delight you with its stylish simplicity and 50 tones of green views over the golf course, Wither Hills and surrounding farmland.

We hope you enjoyed this story

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