Art Exhibit – Maori Art http://maoriart.net/ Mon, 16 May 2022 18:29:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://maoriart.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Art Exhibit – Maori Art http://maoriart.net/ 32 32 Richland Academy of the Arts Presents Spring Exhibition Featuring Work by Students and Teachers in New Gallery Space https://maoriart.net/richland-academy-of-the-arts-presents-spring-exhibition-featuring-work-by-students-and-teachers-in-new-gallery-space/ Mon, 16 May 2022 18:29:34 +0000 https://maoriart.net/richland-academy-of-the-arts-presents-spring-exhibition-featuring-work-by-students-and-teachers-in-new-gallery-space/ Of Crawford County now staff May 16, 2022 2:25 p.m MANSFIELD – Beginning May 21, the Richland Academy of the Arts will present the Spring Student Art Exhibition, an exhibition featuring work by students and teachers from a variety of classes at the Academy. The classes to be presented will be taught by Ryan Failor, […]]]>

Of May 16, 2022 2:25 p.m

MANSFIELD – Beginning May 21, the Richland Academy of the Arts will present the Spring Student Art Exhibition, an exhibition featuring work by students and teachers from a variety of classes at the Academy.

The classes to be presented will be taught by Ryan Failor, Autumn Cadle and Jacy Warrick. Classes include 60+ alternative media, cave art for kids, collage for kids, introduction to handcrafting ceramics, and private art classes. Each artwork demonstrates the creativity of the artist and the skillfully learned technique of their medium.

The exciting range of mediums includes acrylic, alcohol ink, ceramic, charcoal, collage, graphite pencil and oil paint. The themes of the exhibition range from landscape, figure, still life to the completely abstract. This exhibition is the first of many to be curated at the Academy’s newly renovated Snyder Art Gallery on the first floor.

For more information about registering for classes or classes, call Richland Academy at (419) 522-8224 or visit us richlandacademy.com.

Richland Academy…where everyone can discover the artist within, located at the corner of 4th Street and Walnut St., was founded in 1991 and is supported by the Ohio Arts Council.

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Chester Arnold the subject of a career-spanning exhibition https://maoriart.net/chester-arnold-the-subject-of-a-career-spanning-exhibition/ Sat, 14 May 2022 22:08:05 +0000 https://maoriart.net/chester-arnold-the-subject-of-a-career-spanning-exhibition/ Sonoma artist Chester Arnold smiles as he considers his work will be featured at a museum this spring alongside exhibits honoring Andy Warhol and Ansel Adams. “We’re a great combination,” he says of his current exhibition, which runs concurrently with work by these legendary artists at the Fresno Art Museum. But on a more serious […]]]>

Sonoma artist Chester Arnold smiles as he considers his work will be featured at a museum this spring alongside exhibits honoring Andy Warhol and Ansel Adams.

“We’re a great combination,” he says of his current exhibition, which runs concurrently with work by these legendary artists at the Fresno Art Museum.

But on a more serious note, Arnold adds, “Having an exhibition in a museum is a great thing, and the opportunity to do it with artists you admire and respect is an added bonus.”

Arnold’s latest exhibit isn’t just any show. Through June 26 at the Fresno Art Museum, Reports to the Contrary, A Persistent Vision, Paintings 1971 – 2021 is the first career-spanning gallery retrospective of his work, though he has had more than 40 solo shows and has participated in more than 50 Group shows throughout the West Coast in his 50 year career.

While Sonoma fans are encouraged to check out the Fresno show during its run, those unable to make the trek can view the retrospective through Chester Arnold: Reports to the Contrary, an 82-page catalog of the exhibit featuring personally selected images , see and commentary by Arnold, tracing his work and influences decade by decade.

The catalog and exhibition feature 20 large works and about 20 small paintings, says exhibition curator Michele Ellis Pracy. Some pieces have rarely or never been exhibited before. The catalog will be available in May from the museum’s online store at fresnoartmuseum.org and from Readers’ Books in Sonoma.

Arnold, 70, will also host a presentation and autograph catalog on May 18 at 6 p.m. at the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, 551 Broadway, Sonoma.

50 years of art

“I feel like I’m having as much fun today as I did when I started,” says Arnold. “When I go into the studio, I never know what’s going to happen, but something always happens.”

But despite his long career and standing in Bay Area art circles, it’s almost surprising that the Fresno show is only his first career-spanning exhibition. Arnold’s work has long been admired by some of the most respected names in Bay Area art criticism.

“The value of his work, apart from its joys and distractions, is to prove that the images of personal and social catastrophe that time evokes in us are not incurable,” wrote the late San Francisco Chronicle art critic Kenneth Baker , 1994 on Arnold’s work “Arnold’s skill as a painter is a visible testament and warning of the discipline required to work inwardly with such pictures.” (Arnold and Baker became good friends over the years; the catalog “Reports to the contrary” is dedicated to Baker, who died in 2021.)

In a review of a 1987 exhibition at the William Sawyer Gallery in San Francisco, Rebecca Solnit wrote, “Chester Arnold produced a wonderful series of paintings that could be called surrealist if they weren’t in a way down-to-earth that is contemporary surrealism.” Rare.”

Aside from the awards from renowned art writers, Arnold says the time frame presented in Reports to the Contrary dates back to works from his first public exhibition that were discussed in the local press.

“It was March 1972.[Art critic]Ada Garfinkel was reviewing my exhibition at the Mill Valley Public Library gallery in the Marin Independent Journal,” says Arnold. “I thought fame and fortune were surely on the way.”

A Santa Monica native, the seeds of passion were sown as a child growing up in 1950s Munich, where his father worked as a linguist and field agent for a US intelligence unit. It was this post-war atmosphere “that profoundly influenced his conceptions of humanity and the earth-shattering sense of social responsibility rarely expressed in his paintings,” according to the description of the Fresno Art Museum exhibition. “It was the encounter with the great museums in Munich and Vienna that shaped (his) belief in the power of painting to communicate beyond words.”

“It’s a serious attitude to look at people,” says Arnold about starting a life in art. “I thought I could make the world a better place by painting.”

Arnold studied art at the College of Marin in the early 1970s and earned a master’s degree in fine arts from the San Francisco Art Institute in 1988. In addition to his work at the studio, he taught art at the San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco State University, and Sonoma State University, and spent, perhaps most notably, 20 years as a senior member of the Fine Arts faculty at the College of Marin. In 2018 he left the university.

He fully expected to miss classes, but found that contact with alumni and other passionate artists filled the gaps of “intellectual stimulation” that used to be provided by preparing for discussions and talking about people’s work in class had arisen.

Invitation to join

Arnold’s work is lively, dense and detailed. Over time, his perceived style has embraced labels such as realism, surrealism, and the often-used “storytelling.”

“In the mid-’80s, a lot of art was associated with ‘narratives,'” he says. “And it depended on me.”

At some point, he began to refer to his work as “psychorealism,” says Arnold.

But a colleague said, “Artists can’t name their own genres of painting,” so he stuck to other people’s labels. And Arnold agrees with that.

“When the emotional energy is there (for any description of his style), I just went with it,” he says. “As long as people respond with interest.”

And Arnold still believes he can make the world a better place through painting?

“I do,” he says.

“What kind of validated and informed me is the way that teaching can lead people to tell the stories that we’re going to tell.”

Many of his students have left other careers over the years to find what they always wanted to do.

“What painting was,” says Arnold. “Many of these former students are now exhibiting in galleries and making more money than I do from my work.”

He compares art to “spreading the gospel”.

“Music, literature or poetry – it enables us to communicate with our fellow human beings about what occupies us in the world,” says Arnold.

“The world is an extremely interesting place. As citizens living on this planet, art is an invitation to engage with it as much as possible.”

See more of Chester Arnold’s work at chesterarnold.com.

Email Jason Walsh at Jason.walsh@sonomanews.com.

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A Golden Jubilee: Exhibition commemorates the Prince William Art Society | lifestyles https://maoriart.net/a-golden-jubilee-exhibition-commemorates-the-prince-william-art-society-lifestyles/ Fri, 13 May 2022 09:35:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/a-golden-jubilee-exhibition-commemorates-the-prince-william-art-society-lifestyles/ To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Prince William Art Society, ARTfactory in Manassas is hosting a group art exhibition and special reception. The Golden Jubilee: 50 Years of PWAS exhibition opened on May 4th and runs through June 4th at ARTfactory, 9419 Battle St. The reception with the artists will take […]]]>

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Prince William Art Society, ARTfactory in Manassas is hosting a group art exhibition and special reception.

The Golden Jubilee: 50 Years of PWAS exhibition opened on May 4th and runs through June 4th at ARTfactory, 9419 Battle St.

The reception with the artists will take place on Saturday, May 14th from 6pm to 8pm and is open to the public and free of charge.






The Prince William Art Society was formed in 1971 as the Woodbridge Art Guild Inc. and today has 40 members. To mark its golden anniversary, the group art exhibition will feature 44 original artworks by 11 members of the Kunstverein. This exhibition features a variety of media including oil, acrylic, mixed media and photographic art.

The Arts Society is a non-profit organization established with the aim of promoting appreciation for the fine arts and crafts, gaining recognition and publicity for the work of local artists, and offering a variety of arts education programs and art exhibitions to the Prince William community.

The Prince William Art Society hosts spring and fall art exhibitions at the Tall Oaks Community Center in Lake Ridge and participates in the Hylton Performing Arts Center’s Arts Alive event and the Occoquan Art Festival. The art society currently has exhibitions at both the Clearbrook Center of the Arts at Tacket’s Mill in Woodbridge and the Open Space Arts Gallery in Stonebridge.

The society has monthly meetings followed by educational programs conducted by guests from diverse artistic backgrounds. Meetings include refreshments and time to meet other artists and will take place at Tall Oaks Community Center every fourth Monday of the month at 7:30 p.m. with the exception of December and January.

The society also tries to run at least two affordable workshops a year on different mediums or topics, according to its website.

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The Boca Raton Museum of Art Shows “Art Against a Hollywood Backdrop” https://maoriart.net/the-boca-raton-museum-of-art-shows-art-against-a-hollywood-backdrop/ Wed, 11 May 2022 09:15:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/the-boca-raton-museum-of-art-shows-art-against-a-hollywood-backdrop/ In just a few steps, people enter the Boca Raton Art Museum can travel from the colossal Mount Rushmore to the vast cityscapes of ancient Rome. The 22 renders look real, but they were plucked from the basements of MGM – narrowly escaping a junkyard grave. The Art of the Hollywood Backdrop is the newest […]]]>

In just a few steps, people enter the Boca Raton Art Museum can travel from the colossal Mount Rushmore to the vast cityscapes of ancient Rome.

The 22 renders look real, but they were plucked from the basements of MGM – narrowly escaping a junkyard grave.

The Art of the Hollywood Backdrop is the newest exhibition at the Boca Raton Museum of Art. The hand-painted scenes are decades old, dating back to 1938. But the artists responsible have never been named—until now.

Exhibition co-curators Karen Maness and Thomas Walsh spent hours sifting through archives and oral histories to find the artists behind the lifelike canvases. Although they have been able to credit more than a dozen artists for their work, many still remain unnamed.

Ocean Ridge residents Barbara Tuck, left, and Gayle 'Mya' Breman watch a video presentation against a backdrop used in "North for Northwest" (1959) in the new exhibition "Hollywood backdrop art" at the Boca Raton Museum of Art in Boca Raton.

“I got into it for the love of painting,” said Maness, a University of Texas professor and co-author of The Art of the Hollywood Backdrop, a 13-pound tome published in 2016.

“I carry on with the love of painting but also as an advocate for these artists to help them be seen in history. They deserve to be recognized and honored.” Maness said.

The University of Texas at Austin previously hosted the exhibit, which often sold out even at the height of the pandemic. This spring, the university loaned several works to the Boca Raton Museum of Art.

Turn off the fuse "The sound of music" (1965) is exhibited in the "Hollywood backdrop art" exhibit.

The exhibition features 22 iconic backdrops, including the Austrian Alps from The Sound of Music and Mount Rushmore from Alfred Hitchcock’s North By Northwest – a favorite of Emmy Award-winning production designer Walsh.

“It’s like naming your favorite child. You can’t do that,” Walsh said, then turned to face giant Mount Rushmore. “But it is.”

Works like this are often created by four to five artists on a tight schedule—one to four weeks, depending on the project. Hitchcock’s backdrop towers over visitors at 27.5 x 18 m.

What sets this art form apart from what museum-goers are more accustomed to seeing — aside from its sheer size — is that it wasn’t made for the naked eye.

“These are artists who understand the art of illusion,” said Irvin Lippman, the museum’s executive director.

"Night view of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, France" is one of many soundstage and set paintings on display.

To see:The collections on display at the Norton include works from the 15th century to modern times

3 to see:MOSAIC opportunities include Arts Garage, Jupiter Lighthouse, and Resource Depot

They may not look as detailed as classic realism, but they look seamless and tangible in a camera lens.

“It was really interesting and we tried to fit her into the films,” said Linda Toner, a Boca Raton resident and museum member, after completing a factory tour. “We’ve found that if you pull out your camera to take a picture, it looks a lot more realistic.”

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Four art students from Alexandria Technical and Community College will exhibit their work at Fine Line Arts – Alexandria Echo Press https://maoriart.net/four-art-students-from-alexandria-technical-and-community-college-will-exhibit-their-work-at-fine-line-arts-alexandria-echo-press/ Mon, 09 May 2022 16:39:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/four-art-students-from-alexandria-technical-and-community-college-will-exhibit-their-work-at-fine-line-arts-alexandria-echo-press/ ALEXANDRIA – Four graduates of Alexandria Technical and Community College’s Communication Art and Design program will be exhibiting some of their work at Fine Line Arts in Alexandria from May 14 to June 24. Maglothin, 22, is an animal illustrator whose main style is realism. Her favorite mediums are colored pencils and digital art created […]]]>

ALEXANDRIA – Four graduates of Alexandria Technical and Community College’s Communication Art and Design program will be exhibiting some of their work at Fine Line Arts in Alexandria from May 14 to June 24.

Maglothin, 22, is an animal illustrator whose main style is realism. Her favorite mediums are colored pencils and digital art created in Procreate on her iPad. She will graduate from ATCC on May 11th with an Associate’s Degree in Fine Arts. She says she hopes to get a job as a freelancer or illustrator.

“I get inspiration from nature, the world and the animals around me and my pets,” Maglothin said. “I make art to capture the expression and spirit of animals.”

Originally from Morristown, Maglothin has been drawing since she could hold a colored pencil. She says she has always loved art and never tires of it.

“Art is a way to create something cool or pretty and to express your emotions. Sometimes I use them to show how I’m feeling,” she says. “I am proud to have the opportunity to exhibit my art at Fine Lines Art Gallery. I hope to meet new people and socialize.”

Her favorite piece on display is entitled “Scarlett”, a colored pencil drawing of her mother’s horse.

Berglund, 22, of Alexandria, will graduate from ATCC this spring with an associate’s degree in communications art and design. After graduation, she plans to transfer to the University of Wisconsin Stout to pursue her bachelor’s degree in graphic design.

She says she’s a dabbler when it comes to media and styles. But her favorites are pen, ink and oil painting.

“I love the precision of pen and ink and how much you can create just by playing with lines and strokes. I love oil painting because it’s relaxing and allows me to relax and live in the moment,” Berglund said. “As far as styles go, I like to use vibrant colors and a light-hearted, playful tone.”

Berglund says she had a natural inclination towards art since she was young and used it as a means of entertainment.

For a long time she didn’t see art as a realistic career option, says Berglund. But after her life drawing instructor said she had a lot of potential, she was convinced to join the Communication Arts and Design program.

“For me, art is all about creation. There is so much joy in making a piece and watching an idea come to life. It almost feels like magic to see a piece come together,” she said.

One of her favorite works on display is The Anatomy Lesson – a parody oil painting of Rembrandt’s The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolae’s Tulip”.

Pesta, 19, grew up in Royalton and is an illustrator who loves telling stories through her work. Most of her pieces are made digitally in Procreate or Adobe Illustrator in the style of cartoons and fantasy. She also works with traditional mediums such as watercolor and oil paint. She will graduate from ATCC on May 11th.

“I create for the joy of creating… It’s a release from everything else that’s going on in the world, from all the stresses of everyday life,” Pesta said.

Pesta says she has always had a love for art and illustration, and reads children’s books like The Invisible Moose and Go Dogs Go! Had a strong influence on her as a child.

After school, she says, she hopes to land a job in illustration, but currently has side projects lined up for the meantime. She chose art because she enjoys it and is passionate about it.

She said her favorite piece is the lion and the rabbit because it best showcases her illustration skills.

“Having my work on display feels like a great achievement. I had never exhibited a work like this before and it’s a big step for me,” she said.

Mattzon, 20, of Zimmerman, will graduate from ATCC in Individualized Studies this spring. She plans to land a design job, but hopes to one day become a children’s book illustrator.

She said that from a young age she was inspired to create art by her father.

“We had this framed ‘doodle’ he did a long time ago of a horse-drawn carriage in the snow, and every time I looked at it I felt drawn to the subject. From then on, I drew all the time,” Mattson said.

Mattson will be exhibiting a three-part series called Minnesota Waterfowl that will showcase her love for plants, wildlife and Minnesota, and will showcase her two favorite media, watercolor and colored pencil.

“Art for me is an escape from frustration, anger and sadness. It’s something to look forward to after a long day, and it’s something timeless,” she says. “I don’t have to do it all in one sitting. It can take me years to complete a piece without judgment.”

She added that when people see her work in a gallery, it’s a dream come true.

“Artist recognition is something we all aspire to, especially in a profession that’s labeled ‘broke.'”

A drawing of two mallards by Eryn Mattson.

Contributed photo.

These four artists will be exhibiting their work at Fine Line Arts starting Saturday May 14th with an open house gala from 3pm to 6pm and will be on sale until Friday June 24th.

For more information, call 320-433-0923 or visit the store’s website at

www.finelineartsmn.com.

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Art exhibit celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Lincoln Memorial https://maoriart.net/art-exhibit-celebrates-the-100th-anniversary-of-the-lincoln-memorial/ Sat, 07 May 2022 15:42:44 +0000 https://maoriart.net/art-exhibit-celebrates-the-100th-anniversary-of-the-lincoln-memorial/ STOCKBRIDGE, Mass. — An art exhibit featuring multimedia works and artifacts inspired by Washington’s iconic seated Lincoln sculpture opened Saturday at the Norman Rockwell Museum to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the monument. The museum is located in Stockbridge, the same small town in Massachusetts that houses Chesterwood, the studio of Lincoln Memorial sculptor Daniel […]]]>

STOCKBRIDGE, Mass. — An art exhibit featuring multimedia works and artifacts inspired by Washington’s iconic seated Lincoln sculpture opened Saturday at the Norman Rockwell Museum to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the monument.

The museum is located in Stockbridge, the same small town in Massachusetts that houses Chesterwood, the studio of Lincoln Memorial sculptor Daniel Chester French. The museum and studio collaborated on the Lincoln Memorial Illustrated exhibit.

At least eight works by famed American illustrator Norman Rockwell depicted the Civil War-era President. Some of these pieces, including the “Lincoln for the Defense” illustration depicting the former President in his early years as a lawyer, are included in the exhibit.

More than 50 multimedia works, including original paintings, illustrations, photographs and artifacts inspired by the sculpture, inaugurated in May 1922, are on display.

“Norman Rockwell greatly admired President Lincoln,” said Laurie Norton Moffatt, President and CEO of the Norman Rockwell Museum. “He just looked at him as a preeminent American and admired his ability to bring the country together at such a challenging time, and he incorporated him into a number of his paintings.”

The exhibit also includes a print of Rockwell’s 1975 oil painting by famed Civil War photographer Mathew Brady, which captures a portrait of a seated Lincoln. The exhibit is showing a print because the original is in a private collection, Moffatt said.

The exhibition runs until September 5th in Stockbridge before moving on to the Concord Museum from September 22nd until next February 26th. Plans to exhibit them elsewhere are still in the works, Moffatt said.


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The artist explores the African diaspora in a new exhibition https://maoriart.net/the-artist-explores-the-african-diaspora-in-a-new-exhibition/ Thu, 05 May 2022 23:29:41 +0000 https://maoriart.net/the-artist-explores-the-african-diaspora-in-a-new-exhibition/ UO’s Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art is highlighting Lewis Watts’ photography in its new exhibition Likeness or Not: Reflections from the African Diaspora, on view at J Focus West Gallery until September 4th. On Thursday, May 19, at 4 p.m., the artist will present “Faces and Places in the Diaspora‘, a guest artist talk, in […]]]>

UO’s Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art is highlighting Lewis Watts’ photography in its new exhibition Likeness or Not: Reflections from the African Diaspora, on view at J Focus West Gallery until September 4th.

On Thursday, May 19, at 4 p.m., the artist will present “Faces and Places in the Diaspora‘, a guest artist talk, in Room 177, Lawrence Hall. The lecture will also be broadcast live UO Media Services YouTube Channel.

Likeness or Not: Reflections from the African Diaspora is a collection of photographs detailing the culture and history of the African Diaspora. The collection includes portraits of artists, activists, authors, and musicians who are important figures in modern African American culture.

The exhibition, organized by Associate Curator of Photography Thom Sempere, will also feature Watts’ photographs of historical publications.

“For more than 50 years, the focus of my photographic practice and research has been based on my interest in the culture, history and migration of people in the African diaspora,” said Watts. “The work has developed into a multitude of related series, two of which are represented in the exhibition: portraits of people I was drawn to photograph because they do not let external forces dictate how they present themselves to the world and who doing so seems comfortable in their own skin, and historical African American book covers and pages as objects and reflections of the narrative of history and, in some cases, as brief for white supremacy.”

Sempere said the exhibition offers an opportunity to look over the shoulder of a keen observer of both historical and contemporary portrayals of people in the African diaspora.

“His subjects are usually aware of his presence, and his commitment to them is central to the work,” he said. “Contrasting with the inherent celebratory nature of the portraits is his series, which examines the history of depictions of African Americans in print, the motivations of the authors of those depictions, and the narratives they seek to assert. Together, this powerful combination makes an important and thoughtful gift for the JSMA collection.”

Watts is a photographer, archivist, curator, and professor emeritus of art at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His research and artistic work focuses on the “cultural landscape”, mainly in communities in the African diaspora in different parts of the world.

He is co-author of Harlem of the West: The San Francisco Fillmore Jazz Era, New Orleans Suite: Music and Culture in Transition, and Portraits.

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Scenes from the Golden Era star in a new museum exhibit – The Hollywood Reporter https://maoriart.net/scenes-from-the-golden-era-star-in-a-new-museum-exhibit-the-hollywood-reporter/ Sun, 01 May 2022 21:33:05 +0000 https://maoriart.net/scenes-from-the-golden-era-star-in-a-new-museum-exhibit-the-hollywood-reporter/ Production designer Thomas Walsh cites a saying well known to stage artists and designers: “If you really pay attention to the setting, it’s a failed setting.” Mammoth paintings meant to depict everything from Mount Rushmore to an office corridor or an Austrian mountain range may have been created to trick the eye and literally fade […]]]>

Production designer Thomas Walsh cites a saying well known to stage artists and designers: “If you really pay attention to the setting, it’s a failed setting.”

Mammoth paintings meant to depict everything from Mount Rushmore to an office corridor or an Austrian mountain range may have been created to trick the eye and literally fade into the background in a movie, but now they take center stage new museum exhibit just unveiled in South Florida. Art of the Hollywood Set: The Creative Legacy of Cinema opened April 20 at the Boca Raton Museum of Art and features 22 hand-painted sets from classic films, including North for Northwest, sing in the rain and The sound of musicas well as a handful that have yet to be attributed to specific films.

The exhibit is the brainchild of museum director Irvin Lippman, who was watching CBS Sunday morning in February 2020 and caught a story that explores a renewed appreciation for the once forgotten scenes from many films of Hollywood’s golden era. The segment included interviews with Walsh and with Karen Maness, assistant professor of scenic design and figurative painting at the University of Texas at Austin and co-author of a seminal book on the subject, 2016 The art of the Hollywood backdrop. Lippman, a UT Austin graduate, decided that he would try to get in touch with Maness and see if the sets could work as a theme for her own museum display. “When I spoke to Karen it was obvious [that] enough to create an exhibition,” notes Lippman.

Like many objects from classic films, most of the sets in the exhibit were rescued years ago from forgotten nooks and basements in studio buildings, many by JC Backings, a Culver City company that specializes in creating sets for film and television distribution (while they still produce hand-painted backgrounds, many of today’s backgrounds are produced on vinyl or as digital art). The firm was founded in 1962 by John Harold Coakley and John Gary Coakley, a father and son team with deep ties to the industry: several of their endorsements can be seen in the 1965s The sound of musicwhile John Harold’s father, John Coakley, worked as a set designer under the legendary George Gibson, who headed MGM’s scenic design department from 1938 to 1968 (Gibson’s first film for the studio was in 1939 The Wizard of Oz, although its Technicolor-friendly sets are sadly believed to have been lost for this film). Over the years, JC Backings bought discarded sets from MGM, Disney, 20th Century Fox and other studios saving them from dumpster fate in some cases. “I’m not sure many of these would have survived without JC backings,” says Lippman.

Walsh agrees. When John Gary Coakley’s daughter and current company president, Lynne Coakley, knew they would have to edit about 200 backgrounds from their collection when they moved to the new headquarters, she called Walsh in New Mexico, where he was working on Netflix Longmireto ask if he knew who might be interested in acquiring them. That conversation prompted Walsh to start the Art Directors Guild Backdrop Recovery Project, a project in which he, Maness, and Coakley photographed and cataloged the discarded backdrops in hopes of finding new homes for each. “They realized there were 207 sets that they wouldn’t take, pieces from the bottom that weren’t rented,” explains Walsh. He spent about two years scouting around the world for locations for the backings, at various venues ranging from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to UT Austin and the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland in Glasgow, the thankful five Scots by birth accepted backdrops painted by Gibson. The set designer, whose credits also include An American in Paris and brigadedied in 2001.

Fast forward to 2020, when Lippman was able to reach Maness and offer his museum’s space for an exhibition. She immediately invited Walsh to help curate the event. “We knew there was treasure beyond UT Austin’s collection, so we approached JC Backings with a request to borrow 17 of their backing boards, including iconic paintings by Ben-Hur, north by north-westand The sound of music‘ Maness adds, noting that Lynne Coakley’s company was quick to agree — and went one step further. “Amazingly, they advised that they would prefer the loan to be donated to UT Austin’s Texas Performing Arts Hollywood Backdrop Collection as a teaching resource for future generations under my care and guidance.”

Still from the 1938s Marie Antoinette.
Boca Raton Art Museum

Indeed, strolling through the galleries of the Boca Raton Museum feels like touring the Hollywood sound stages, from a trompe l’oeil painted tapestry prominently used in the 1938s Marie Antoinette to a New York City skyline seen in both 1949s The source head and television The Jeffersons and a huge cityscape of ancient Rome originally painted for the 1959s Ben Hur and later rented out for reuse in the 2016 Coen Brothers film Hail, Caesar!

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Karen L. Maness and Thomas A. Walsh in front of a backdrop sing in the rain.
Boca Raton Art Museum

Rope posts prevent visitors from getting too close, but this exhibition is also the first time audiences have been able to see such an extensive collection of hand-painted backdrops in person. “We want people to appreciate these works for the artistry,” says Lippman. “We invite you to take a close look and appreciate the details and brushstrokes.”

Between the scenes are video screens telling behind-the-scenes production design stories, with interviews including Gibson, who was featured in the 1992 Turner Classic Movies documentary MGM: When the lion roars. Alongside a backdrop of a grand sweeping staircase — among the “Unknown Film” pieces sure to make classic film fans’ heads swoon — a wall lists about 100 stage artists who were responsible for the hand-painted sets in Hollywood’s golden era. Not surprisingly, male names dominate the list, although a few female names are scattered throughout. “One of the reasons we wanted to do this was to give recognition to those who have never received recognition for their work,” Lippman said. “Back then, the studios didn’t recognize everyone who worked on a film on screen, but it was talented artists who made a real contribution.”

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Boca Raton Art Museum

According to Lippman, one of the most popular photo backdrops for museum visitors is a scene by the water The sound of music and the depiction of an office hallway featured in Donald O’Connor’s 1952 number Make ‘Em Laugh sing in the rain. A green fringed couch and the rag doll that O’Connor used in the scene were also reproduced for selfie moments. “People like to pretend to lean against the stone railing The sound of music background, or they’re sitting on the couch pretending to be Donald O’Connor,” says Lippman. “It’s been fun watching people enjoy memories of their favorite movies in this way.”

In a late move, Lippman realized that an ideal location existed for one of the largest sets included in the exhibit: a side view of Mount Rushmore, measuring 30 feet high by 91 feet by 9 inches wide North for Northwest and painted by Gibson and his team. “As we were developing the exhibit, we realized that a perfect location for this setting was right in front of us the whole time,” says Lippman, gesturing around the museum’s huge, two-story lobby. “Obviously we had to tuck it in at the sides to fit it here, but it was really a highlight to see it go up.” (A smaller Mount Rushmore setting from a different angle, also from the 1959 Alfred Hitchcock thriller , currently at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles.)

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A backdrop of Mount Rushmore used in North for Northweston view at the Boca Raton Museum of Art.
Boca Raton Art Museum

What is Lippman ultimately hoping for from the exhibition? “A lot of us grew up watching these movies, and those memories can be really strong,” he says. “You see people recognize those moments in their favorite movies, and that impact is very special. I also hope that younger generations will see something that speaks to them, and it might inspire an appreciation for these films in audiences that haven’t experienced them.”

Art of the Hollywood Backdrop: Cinema’s Creative Legacy runs through January 22, 2023; an adjacent exhibition, “Bonnie Lautenberg: Art Meets Hollywood” features the Palm Beach-based artist’s pairings of film stills with iconic artworks released in the same year and runs through August 21, 2022. Visit for more information bocamuseum.org.

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The Hunt Library presents the exhibition “John Frederick Walker: Altered Books”. https://maoriart.net/the-hunt-library-presents-the-exhibition-john-frederick-walker-altered-books/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 04:12:14 +0000 https://maoriart.net/the-hunt-library-presents-the-exhibition-john-frederick-walker-altered-books/ FALLS VILLAGE – The David M. Hunt Library will feature altered book art by John Frederick Walker in its ongoing Art in the Stacks series through September. The Falls Village artist began incorporating book forms into his art in the mid-1990s. “These works come from real books or book fragments that have been radically altered […]]]>

FALLS VILLAGE – The David M. Hunt Library will feature altered book art by John Frederick Walker in its ongoing Art in the Stacks series through September.

The Falls Village artist began incorporating book forms into his art in the mid-1990s.

“These works come from real books or book fragments that have been radically altered and range from tabletop sculptures to large wall reliefs. All show open book pages from which pages have been torn or cut, transforming what remains into graphic meditations on hidden, missing or destroyed information, memories and losses,” read a statement.


Walker’s art has been exhibited nationally in solo and group shows and is represented in a number of private and public collections, including the Yale University Art Gallery, the Brooklyn Museum Library, and the National Gallery of Art in Washington.

He is also the author of A Certain Curve of Horn, an account of his search for an endangered antelope species in war-torn Angola, and a history of the ivory trade, Ivory’s Ghosts.

For more information, call the library at 860-824-7424 or visit huntlibrary.org/art-wall where the entire exhibit can be viewed and artwork can be reserved for purchase. The library is located at 63 Main St., Falls Village.

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BWAC returns for the annual Fall Art Show in Red Hook https://maoriart.net/bwac-returns-for-the-annual-fall-art-show-in-red-hook/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 22:22:37 +0000 https://maoriart.net/bwac-returns-for-the-annual-fall-art-show-in-red-hook/ Sandra Giunta, “Coral Memories-11”; Volume. Photos courtesy of BWAC The Brooklyn Waterfront Artists Coalition (BWAC) has returned with its annual art show for the season at its historic gallery space at 481 Van Brunt St. in Red Hook. The exhibition will open with an opening reception on Saturday 30 April. It runs until Sunday, June […]]]>

Sandra Giunta, “Coral Memories-11”; Volume. Photos courtesy of BWAC

The Brooklyn Waterfront Artists Coalition (BWAC) has returned with its annual art show for the season at its historic gallery space at 481 Van Brunt St. in Red Hook.

The exhibition will open with an opening reception on Saturday 30 April. It runs until Sunday, June 5 from 1pm to 6pm

BWAC is an artist-run gallery with around 150 members.

The gallery will be closed for four months over the winter and the artists are ready to reopen this weekend.

BWAC Co-President Alicia Degener is excited about the return of the annual event.

“We started spring cleaning this past March and April and hung all the shows,” she said. “BWAC has a strong sense of pride and community like an extended family. Everyone is very proud of our beautiful huge space and all the new artwork that has been created over the winter break. We are all super happy to be back together in the gallery and can’t wait to reopen this weekend.”

Nora Aresti, “Ashokan Reservoir, Wo
NYC gets its drinking water”, acrylic on canvas.

BWAC spring exhibitions include drawings, paintings, sculptures, photographs, installations and more.

This year’s exhibitions include The Elements, Sky Earth Sea, Art and Artists for Ukraine, and The Brooklyn Watercolor Society.

The Elements gathers contemporary working artists for a re-evaluation of our relationship to the world. It is an examination of the essence of existence as manifested in its ancient essentials: water, earth, fire, wind and sky.

The jury is Scout Hutchinson, Associate Curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.

Sky Earth Sea is an accompanying exhibition showcasing the work of BWAC members. As the world continues to grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic, artists are expressing their feelings about where we are now in relation to our surroundings.

With Art and Artists for Ukraine, BWAC partners with Gap Inc. to raise funds for Ukrainian refugees with a special exhibition. Proceeds from the sale of the exhibition will go to the United Nations-established UNHCR fund to support refugee families in the USA. Also, Gap Inc. will adjust sales.

Peter Lopez, “Album 6”; Oil on canvas.

The Brooklyn Watercolor Society is a special exhibit featuring a variety of watercolor techniques presented by the Brooklyn Watercolor Society.

Housed in a Civil War-era warehouse on the Red Hook waterfront, BWAC is an artist-led organization founded in 1978 by 16 artists.

Visit bwac.org for more information.

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