Art Exhibit – Maori Art http://maoriart.net/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 18:13:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://maoriart.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Art Exhibit – Maori Art http://maoriart.net/ 32 32 Awakening Flower Exhibit at the Honolulu Museum of Art https://maoriart.net/awakening-flower-exhibit-at-the-honolulu-museum-of-art/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 18:13:32 +0000 https://maoriart.net/awakening-flower-exhibit-at-the-honolulu-museum-of-art/ GImmersed in blossoms – could there be anything more ethereal? Entering the new “Awakening” exhibit at the Honolulu Museum of Art is a dreamy endeavor, with strings of flowers of all types and colors dangling high up from the ceiling as if floating in mid-air. As you stroll down the corridor of dried branches, you […]]]>

GImmersed in blossoms – could there be anything more ethereal? Entering the new “Awakening” exhibit at the Honolulu Museum of Art is a dreamy endeavor, with strings of flowers of all types and colors dangling high up from the ceiling as if floating in mid-air. As you stroll down the corridor of dried branches, you can’t help but feel a sense of calm. Is it the gently shifting botanicals that blend into one another as you move like an ombre of herbs, a strange sort of pantomime of the seasons? Or is it the way they defy gravity, suspended by their strings, a nexus of frozen buds with you at their center. If an explosion of blossoms happened around you and then that moment stopped forever, what would you hear in the silence? what would you see in the silence You’ll want to keep walking through these floral curtains to find out.

The exhibition is the first Hawaiian installation by British artist Rebecca Louise Law, who has continued to create immersive installations across Europe and the United States, utilizing her signature aesthetic of delicately draped and serpentine-strung natural materials. The Honolulu installation uses more than a million flowers. To achieve this massive number, Law drew from her own collection of dried plants, recycled from previous exhibitions around the world, and also incorporated new Hawaiian plants and found materials. In fact, 50,000 flowers were collected or donated by the Hawaiian community, including bougainvillea, bozu, gardenia, kukui, pīkake, puakenikeni, and Spanish moss.

Working with sustainability in mind, Law hopes that these “contemplative” spaces, adorned with blooms so painstakingly and carefully preserved, strung and hung, will provide opportunities for viewers to slow down and reflect on nature’s fragility and ultra-fast pace to think about modern consumer culture. And where better to sing this message than on the islands? Like the flower collectors and lei-makers who pour their time and aloha into each bloom, Law’s floral display — collected and hung with the help of local community groups — is an ode to and a celebration of the power of flowers: the way you can help us to tap into ourselves, to make ourselves feel and to remember the connections that exist between our hearts, our bodies, our minds and the many other brilliant creations in this natural world around us.

Photo: Courtesy of the Honolulu Museum of Art

The details:
● The exhibition is located on the second floor of the museum in galleries 12 and 13 and will be open for one year. Look for elevators with the Awakening image.
● General museum admission is $20. Admission for Hawaii residents is $10 and under 18s are free.
● The museum is open on Thursdays and Sundays from 10 am to 6 pm; 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays; and closed Monday to Wednesday.
● Don’t miss the accompanying exhibition in Gallery 27 (between the Doris Duke Theater entrance and the gift shop) entitled Cross Pollination: Flowers Across the Collection. This curation of pieces from the museum’s permanent collection explores “the emotional, psychological, and spiritual resonance of flowers in art.” On display are Native American beadwork, Japanese screens and art canvases, including the iconic The Lei Maker.

900 S. Beretania St., (808) 532-8700, honolulumuseum.org.


SEE ALSO: Activities


]]>
Robert Pattinson curated an art exhibition, the art community was not amused https://maoriart.net/robert-pattinson-curated-an-art-exhibition-the-art-community-was-not-amused/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 11:06:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/robert-pattinson-curated-an-art-exhibition-the-art-community-was-not-amused/ Robert Pattinson curated an art exhibition, the art community was not amused Robert Pattinson has now taken on the role of art curator while collaborating with Sotheby’s on an exhibition for the Contemporary Curated programme, he reports Artnet. Since 2013, the auction house has hired celebrity guest curators to help organize special sales, including grime […]]]>
Robert Pattinson curated an art exhibition, the art community was not amused

Robert Pattinson has now taken on the role of art curator while collaborating with Sotheby’s on an exhibition for the Contemporary Curated programme, he reports Artnet.

Since 2013, the auction house has hired celebrity guest curators to help organize special sales, including grime musician Skepta, designer Margherita Missoni, media mogul Oprah Winfrey and DJ Steve Aoki.

Pattinson chose six works by artists including Willem de Kooning, Richard Serra and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye. According to Artnet, the estimated values ​​for the works range from $100,000 to $2.5 million. Pattinson, who is described by others as a “passionate art collector”. page six Source, had previously auctioned off one of his own sketches for charity in 2017.

However, not everyone is enthusiastic about this exhibition. The news was not well received by art enthusiasts and supporters. On the official Sotheby’s Instagram post, many wrote their thoughts on Pattinson’s curatorial debut.

One person commented: “Hmm… how about art teachers? Or working artists?”

Another said: “When you’re a star, they let you do everything. You can do everything.”

Meanwhile, an art insider told page six that even Sotheby’s is unlikely to buy its own shtick. “[Pattinson] maybe pick a few [of pieces] off – but that’s about it. No major auction house will trust a non-art specialist to put together an auction,” they said.

However, some users spoke out for the Twilight star: “We need more ‘visible’ people (aka celebs or whatever you want to call them) who are committed to the arts and create intrigue and interest in young people, Viewing art as such is an important means of expression…especially with the looming increase in mental health issues, an escape route and alternative expression is becoming increasingly important…” one user wrote.

Despite the scathing comments from the art community, the publication also noted that Katie Holmes was one of over 15,000 people who actually liked the post.

When page six Asked Sotheby’s about the unenthusiastic response, a representative said: “Fostering new perspectives by collaborating with guest curators is nothing new and we look forward to welcoming you to our exhibition.”

Another source said that the whole point of portraying Pattinson “is that they are people from the art world or cultural figures, [Sotheby’s staff] find them interesting and are collectors. You don’t pretend.”

The reason Pattinson was chosen for this role was because he is a passionate art collector rather than a seasoned curator.

The exhibition curated by the Batman star is currently running September 23-29 at Sotheby’s New York. A live auction will conclude the exhibition on September 30th.

]]>
Get the Pokémon TCG Online Art Exhibition before it’s gone https://maoriart.net/get-the-pokemon-tcg-online-art-exhibition-before-its-gone/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 22:04:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/get-the-pokemon-tcg-online-art-exhibition-before-its-gone/ The Pokémon TCG is hosting a special, limited-time online art exhibition honoring the art and history of the popular series. The art of Pokémon trading card game will be honored with a limited-time online exhibition that will end soon. That Pokemon The exhibition was first announced this summer as an event celebrating the style history […]]]>

The Pokémon TCG is hosting a special, limited-time online art exhibition honoring the art and history of the popular series.


The art of Pokémon trading card game will be honored with a limited-time online exhibition that will end soon. That Pokemon The exhibition was first announced this summer as an event celebrating the style history of the popular game. The exhibition includes several areas that are perfect for fans of the series, but will only be available for a few more weeks.


While much of the appeal of the Pokémon trading card game comes from the actual gameplay, collecting is just as important for many players – for some even more important than the game itself. For many fans, the fascination with Pokemon Card collecting is largely due to the artwork of the cards, as well as the rarity and uniqueness of the designs. Over the years, Pokemon TCG has featured amazing works of art in a large number of releases, much to the delight of collectors.

SCREENRANT VIDEO OF THE DAY

See also: The best Pokémon GO TCG alt-art and full-art cards

The recent Pokémon trading card game Art exhibition will be hosted on the Anique Inc. Website until October 23rd and contains three different sections: Life, History and Artists. Life focuses on the lush environments and on the presentation of Pokémon in their natural habitat,“Story” details the evolution of the cards and their art style since their debut in 1996, and “Artist” is all about the different styles that artists have used over the years to convey each Pokémon and its personality, created by the illustrator Wada Takumi – many of these were shared on the Pokémon trading card game Twitter account – plus artist comments, a special Pikachu room, and more.


The artistic history of Pokémon is remarkable and historical

It’s easy to focus on monetary value Pokémon trading card game Cards – many players consider cards an investment, and even those who don’t are likely to be drawn to stories about extremely valuable cards. However, the artistry and evolution of the game’s cards over time is simply amazing to see and is something many players may not have noticed unless they have been collecting for many years. Even if high-quality cards are often priced this way because of the artwork, the artistic appreciation of the cards can easily fall by the wayside.

Over the years the Pokémon trading card game has seen thousands of different cards come and go, and hundreds of Pokemon Collector’s Editions featuring special cards have been purchased by fans around the world. So many years after the series began, a retrospective on the history of the game and its art is very special. This Pokémon trading card game The art exhibition is so varied in its exhibits that there is undoubtedly something that will interest any fan – but players should hurry as they only have until next month.

Source: Anique Inc., Pokemon TCG/Twitter

]]>
NRW Alumni Art Show Begins September 23 With Opening Reception – The Times of Wayne County https://maoriart.net/nrw-alumni-art-show-begins-september-23-with-opening-reception-the-times-of-wayne-county/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 00:20:21 +0000 https://maoriart.net/nrw-alumni-art-show-begins-september-23-with-opening-reception-the-times-of-wayne-county/ The 11th Annual Alumni Art Exhibition will be on view September 23 – October 28, 2022 at the North Rose-Wolcott Art Gallery. There will be an opening reception on Friday, September 23 from 5pm to 7pm. The NRW Alumni Art Show is back after a two-year break due to the pandemic. The exhibition features work […]]]>

The 11th Annual Alumni Art Exhibition will be on view September 23 – October 28, 2022 at the North Rose-Wolcott Art Gallery. There will be an opening reception on Friday, September 23 from 5pm to 7pm.

The NRW Alumni Art Show is back after a two-year break due to the pandemic. The exhibition features work by artists who have graduated from North Rose-Wolcott. Recent work on the exhibition space includes freshly painted walls and a new hanging system for the 2D pieces.

The current artist roster includes 20 alumni with graduation dates from 1956 to 2009. Several participants graduated from high school before the two schools merged to form North Rose-Wolcott High School. John Crouse, born in 1956, has worked with wood for most of his life. One of his submissions is a beautiful turned wooden plate. It’s a 16 inch cherry meat slab.

Robyn Chapin Bridson, born in 1992, submitted one of the many paintings she has recently created. Titled Amongst the Flowers, this acrylic piece features a cute mouse snuggled under a bouquet of white flowers. Robyn joined the middle school staff this fall as a 7th grade teacher.

Kendra Granger Cagle, born 2005, can present a variety of arts and will be exhibiting a graphic artwork. Her work is a board game she designed including the box, the board and all the pieces.

The show will feature more than 60 artworks. The entry list includes: Chris Trine, Katherine Snyder, Kendra Granger Cagle, Mark Baldridge, Howard Skinner, Roman Perez, John Crouse, Cheyenne Boone, Sabrina Green, Duane Shipley, Kelley Shipley Allen, Michelle Griggs Patterson, Kirby Dunton Carespodi, Robyn Chapin Bridson , Dave Denner, Craig Trine, Mark Williams, Shueston Giuffrida, Mackenzie Gelina, Melissa Francisco Martin and Yvonne Gardner Doyle.

All are welcome to the reception on September 23rd at North Rose-Wolcott High School, 11631 Salter-Colvin Road, Wolcott. Light refreshments will be served. Brandon Doyle, born in 2004, will be providing some of his infamous cookies for the refreshment table.

]]>
SCENE: The Rise of Print exhibition is now open at the Muskegon Museum of Art | Ludington Daily News https://maoriart.net/scene-the-rise-of-print-exhibition-is-now-open-at-the-muskegon-museum-of-art-ludington-daily-news/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/scene-the-rise-of-print-exhibition-is-now-open-at-the-muskegon-museum-of-art-ludington-daily-news/ MUSKEGON – The Muskegon Museum of Art presents The Rise of Print: Rembrandt & Company, an exhibition featuring works by master printmakers from the 14th to the 17th centuries such as Lucas Cranach, Albrecht Dürer, Hans Holbein and Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn. During the 14th to 17th centuries, the Nordic and Italian Renaissance saw a […]]]>

MUSKEGON – The Muskegon Museum of Art presents The Rise of Print: Rembrandt & Company, an exhibition featuring works by master printmakers from the 14th to the 17th centuries such as Lucas Cranach, Albrecht Dürer, Hans Holbein and Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn.

During the 14th to 17th centuries, the Nordic and Italian Renaissance saw a new birth in education, politics and culture in Europe. One of the most notable results was the rise of printing as an art form due to the invention of the printing press by Johannes Gutenberg around 1440.

Artists and craftsmen of the time quickly adapted the new technology to create enduring masterpieces.

The Rise of Print explores a visual record of the growing complexity of skills and concepts in Renaissance printmaking. Works by well-known artists of the time are on display.

All works shown in the exhibition belong to the permanent collection of the Muskegon Museum of Art.

The Rise of Print will be on view at the Muskegon Museum of Art through March 19, 2023.

The exhibition is organized by Shape Corp.

For more information, contact Kristina Broughton at kbrought@muskegonartmuseum.org or by phone at (231) 720-2574.

]]>
3 photographers team up for an impressive monochrome exhibition at the Downtown Art Center https://maoriart.net/3-photographers-team-up-for-an-impressive-monochrome-exhibition-at-the-downtown-art-center/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 03:04:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/3-photographers-team-up-for-an-impressive-monochrome-exhibition-at-the-downtown-art-center/ Three photographers. A show. It is entitled Portraits in Monochrome. Floyd Takeuchi curated the exhibition at Downtown Arts Center. It features black and white images from across the community, taken by three longtime friends. Photojournalist PF Bentley depicts residents of Molokaʻi, an island he calls home. Bentley is a Time Magazine award-winning photographer and was […]]]>

Three photographers. A show. It is entitled Portraits in Monochrome. Floyd Takeuchi curated the exhibition at Downtown Arts Center. It features black and white images from across the community, taken by three longtime friends.

Photojournalist PF Bentley depicts residents of Molokaʻi, an island he calls home. Bentley is a Time Magazine award-winning photographer and was most recently with Honolulu Civil Beat.

Ed Greevy is a veteran photojournalist who has documented the roots of the Hawaiian Renaissance movement. His portraits focus on the struggle for access to the Mākua Valley, which has been under military control for decades.

Finally, Takeuchi’s images focus on the power of a skirt. Takeuchi takes a Micronesian skirt – and flips his image over. He challenges you to leave prejudice behind and see how female leaders in matriarchal society are reclaiming their power.

The Conversation sat down with the artists at the show’s opening to learn more.

The show runs until the end of October. The opening hours of the gallery are Tuesday to Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission is free.

This interview aired on The Conversation on September 13, 2022. The Conversation airs weekdays at 11am on HPR-1.

]]>
Art Center Sarasota Announces 2022-2023 Exhibition Season https://maoriart.net/art-center-sarasota-announces-2022-2023-exhibition-season/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 04:07:30 +0000 https://maoriart.net/art-center-sarasota-announces-2022-2023-exhibition-season/ Art and culture SRQ DAILY MONDAY BUSINESS ISSUE MONDAY 12 SEPTEMBER 2022 | The Art Center Sarasota’s 2022-23 exhibition season includes both the big picture and the small picture. Some of the featured artists explore global issues and seismic shifts in history. Others open the viewer’s gaze to the triumphs and struggles of unique individuals. […]]]>

Art and culture


The Art Center Sarasota’s 2022-23 exhibition season includes both the big picture and the small picture. Some of the featured artists explore global issues and seismic shifts in history. Others open the viewer’s gaze to the triumphs and struggles of unique individuals. In the coming season, the Art Center Sarasota celebrates its full spectrum of artistic vision. These diverse offerings include both solo exhibitions, dedicated to the deeply personal expressions of individual artists, and group exhibitions, curated by jury members of standing in the regional arts landscape. The 2022-2023 season offers exciting works spanning the spectrum of artistic media – from abstract ceramic sculpture to documentary photography. According to Kinsey Robb, executive director of Art Center Sarasota, this tapestry of artistic expression reflects ACS’ overarching mission. “We’re a community arts center,” she says. “The community we serve is amazingly diverse. We honor this diversity with our selection of art and artists.” Robb adds that she’s excited to present a series of artist talks this season – a program that “offers audiences the opportunity to delve deeper into the minds of our artists in an intimate and friendly setting.”

]]>
John Gutierrez’s ‘A Borrowed Distant View’ Art Exhibition Now Opens at South Suburban College – The Southland Journal https://maoriart.net/john-gutierrezs-a-borrowed-distant-view-art-exhibition-now-opens-at-south-suburban-college-the-southland-journal/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 04:36:20 +0000 https://maoriart.net/john-gutierrezs-a-borrowed-distant-view-art-exhibition-now-opens-at-south-suburban-college-the-southland-journal/ The John Gutierrez art exhibition, A Borrowed Distant View, is now open at South Suburban College (South Holland, IL) – The Art & Design Department of South Suburban College (SSC) is pleased to present an exhibition entitled “A Borrowed Distant View” by artist John Gutierrez, which will be on view September 1-30, 2022 at the […]]]>

The John Gutierrez art exhibition, A Borrowed Distant View, is now open at South Suburban College (South Holland, IL) – The Art & Design Department of South Suburban College (SSC) is pleased to present an exhibition entitled “A Borrowed Distant View” by artist John Gutierrez, which will be on view September 1-30, 2022 at the Dorothea Thiel Gallery is on view, with artist reception on Wednesday 28 September 2022 at 1pm

advertisement

Patricia Bonk for State Rep

Gutierrez lives in Las Cruces, New Mexico, where he creates paintings and sculptures in his studio. His work reflects a range of personal interests including ancient civilisations, world history and music. Gutierrez’s exposure to the rich diversity of Western cultures and natural environments has had a significant impact on his work.

Gutierrez believes that an intimate and accurate interpretation of a subject can only be rendered after it has been filtered through the artist’s mind and soul. These feelings and energies then flow from the mind through the artist’s hand to create the sculpture or painting. The result is a reflective impression for the viewer that embraces the feelings and emotions dictated by the artist through his work.

advertisement

Choose David Sheppard

The Dorothea Thiel Gallery is on the fourth floor South Suburban College main site. It is open Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. All SSC galleries are closed on weekends and public holidays. The galleries are partially supported by the SSC Foundation. SSC is located at 15800 South State Street, South Holland, Illinois.

For more information, please email etucker@ssc.edu or call (708) 596-2000 ext. 2300

The John Gutierrez art exhibition, A Borrowed Distant View, is now open at South Suburban College

advertisement

Monica Gordon for Cook County Commissioner
]]>
Painting by a Cameron University professor selected for a juried art exhibition | community news https://maoriart.net/painting-by-a-cameron-university-professor-selected-for-a-juried-art-exhibition-community-news/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://maoriart.net/painting-by-a-cameron-university-professor-selected-for-a-juried-art-exhibition-community-news/ country United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsMinor Outlying Islands of the United StatesCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth of theCuba, RepublicDominican RepublicHaiti, RepublicJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist RepublicAlgeria, People’s Democratic RepublicAmerican SamoaAndorra, PrincipalityAngola, RepublicanguillaAntarctica (the area south of 60° S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, RepublicAzerbaijan, RepublicBahrain, KingdomBangladesh, People’s RepublicBarbadosBelarusBelgium, Kingdom ofBelizeBenin, People’s RepublicBermudasBhutan, KingdomBolivia, RepublicBosnia and […]]]>

]]>
A new exhibition by Wisconsin painter Charles Munch takes up and expands on his natural themes – Isthmus https://maoriart.net/a-new-exhibition-by-wisconsin-painter-charles-munch-takes-up-and-expands-on-his-natural-themes-isthmus/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 13:55:37 +0000 https://maoriart.net/a-new-exhibition-by-wisconsin-painter-charles-munch-takes-up-and-expands-on-his-natural-themes-isthmus/ Simplified, colorful landscapes are populated with often stunned-looking people and animals, often deer. Something is happening here, but it’s not clear what. Wisconsin artist Charles Munch’s symbolic paintings tug at the viewer’s subconscious but defy easy explanation. Both animals and landforms—hills, trees, bodies of water, even fire—are sketched, suggesting styles as diverse as pop art […]]]>

Simplified, colorful landscapes are populated with often stunned-looking people and animals, often deer. Something is happening here, but it’s not clear what. Wisconsin artist Charles Munch’s symbolic paintings tug at the viewer’s subconscious but defy easy explanation.

Both animals and landforms—hills, trees, bodies of water, even fire—are sketched, suggesting styles as diverse as pop art and Australian Aboriginal painting. Munch’s title upcoming exhibition Miracles and Mysteries at the Abel Contemporary Gallery in Stoughton sums up the vaguely unsettling atmosphere of his work.

“One of the reasons I do them is because they allow me to delve into issues I can’t put into words. Sometimes I discover answers through her,” he says.

Munch’s paintings were the subject of a major retrospective at the Museum of Wisconsin Art in 2019; another exhibition followed in spring 2021, “Parallel Worlds”, at the Tory Folliard Gallery in Milwaukee. “Miracles and Mysteries” will feature about 35 paintings, including 18 new works, Munch says, surrounded by many of these new paintings in mid-August, still in his studio on the second floor of his home at the Driftless.

The Wikipedia entry for Munch states that he lives on “a remote hillside near Lone Rock,” but it’s less than an hour from Madison’s west side and the road to his home is dotted with farms; He even shares part of his driveway with a neighbor. However, it’s a long drive from the road to his house. When asked how he plows it in the winter, Munch, 77, says he does the entire length himself with a snow blower, though he admits he may not be able to complete the task for too many more winters.

It’s a down-to-earth attitude that typifies his humble, single-minded approach. His studio has a venetian blind with a pulley system he designed himself, which he uses to regulate the light coming in through the tall south-facing windows. On a table is a stack of pieces of aluminum foil that Munch has formed into color palettes, with his mixed colors matching specific paintings, each in a separate indentation. That’s handy for touch-ups or other corrections – “if I can remember what goes with which painting.”

The wall space is occupied by the paintings directed towards Abel; The rest of the studio houses an archive of his older work, neatly stored in a vertical storage area. Garlic cloves from his garden lie on the ground next to the windows to dry. Elsewhere there are stacks of CDs, tubes of oil paint, brushes, an old lamp, sticks (from trees), crayons, watercolors and antlers.

This exhibition features more recent works, including several created during and in response to the pandemic, including Expulsion from Hell, which was painted fairly early in the shutdown. The pictorial language plays with a standard motif of Renaissance painting, the expulsion from Eden. A man, a woman and a deer standing upright face the viewer, behind them a wall of flames. “The idea is that they’re happy to be evicted and emerge into a new world, changed,” says Munch.

Another work from the pandemic period is called “Hope”. He’s less clear about what this is about, other than that he “was hopeful” when he was working on it. A man and a woman hug in front of a house. “But the clouds are still heavy,” he observes. “It’s not over.”

Munch is sometimes grouped with Upper Midwest artists like Tom Uttech, Randall Berndt, Barry Carlsen, and John Miller as a sort of “Northern mysticism” school of painting, but it’s really nothing so formal and he’s probably the least realistic of the lot them group. “It’s not just Nordic, it’s a certain take on the landscape,” suggests Munch.

Munch begins a work with a sketch made with good old Crayola crayons and watercolors, with the crayons outlining the objects and the watercolors helping him “think about color.” For his actual work, he paints in oil on unstretched canvas, which he staples to the wall. “It allows me to press against the wall,” he says. “I like the resistance.” He begins with large areas of glaze, very thin paint. Details and outlines are added later with a brush. The result is flat and smooth; the viewer can hardly see a brushstroke. He is looking for “clarity and freshness, as if I had done everything at once, even though I didn’t do it”.

He tends to paint the same tableau several times, as in a new painting intended for the Abel show called Deer vs. Wolf, which depicts a deer being chased through a forest by a wolf. “Freezing a moment,” he says, “is how you build suspense.” Considering the scene, he says, “It’s not clear that the deer will escape. I don’t want the picture to tell that story. I intentionally create the mystery.”

He starts with a small painting and then recreates almost the same image on a larger canvas. He painted this again, on an even larger canvas, which is more square than rectangular. Each features the same action but ends with subtle differences in sentiment or mood. “I try it until I’m satisfied,” he says. “With every expansion I have the chance to improve. It gives me great satisfaction to make the painting as I envisioned it.”

Other pieces, like his Mammal Polyptych, are not straight stories, but intended for meditation. “I wanted the human figures and the mammals to clearly confront the viewer,” he says of the four-part work, which shows a man, a bear, and a woman and a deer under a moonlit sky – all standing upright except for the woman, who sits. He likens it to altarpieces in Renaissance Italy, “but made for Wisconsin at the present time.”

There has long been a sense of impending ecological catastrophe in Munch’s work. He’s been labeled an environmentalist – “and I mean, I am, but I never thought of that as part of the paintings,” he says. He concedes that what’s happening is only getting worse, although he’s not sure if that’s affecting his work. “It’s nothing new for me to think about,” he says. “Maybe there was a time when I was more angry. Maybe I’ve softened.”

Looking at his work on the studio walls, Munch sums it up quite optimistically. “The beauty of nature, the growth, the animals – everything that happens seems like a miracle to me.”

Miracles and Mysteries opens September 16 at the Abel Contemporary Gallery in Stoughton with a reception from 5pm to 8pm. Munch will be giving an artist talk on October 1st at 2pm. The exhibition runs until November 6th.

]]>